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The FDA has cautioned against using a specific type of CVS nasal spray, due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that can cause disease in humans. The FDA notes that those who use the product and suffer from cystic fibrosis or immuno-compromised are at particular risk, although the agency also states that they have not yet received any reports of adverse events from the spray.

There has been a voluntary recall of Lot# 173089J of CVS Health 12 Hour Sinus Relief Nasal Mist, a clear, colorless liquid used as a nasal decongestant. Consumers are encouraged to stop using the product and either bring it back to CVS or throw it away.

The CDC has also issued a warning that  Pseudomonas aeruginosa can sicken otherwise healthy people after exposure to water. Children are at particular risk for ear infections after being in inadequately chlorinated swimming pools, and more generalized skin rashes can occur in people who are exposed to both inadequately chlorinated swimming pools and hot tubs.

People who use extended-wear contact lenses may also be at risk for eye infections due to the bacteria. Patients in hospitals — particularly those on breathing machines, using devices such as catheters, and with wounds from surgery or burns — are also at partially risk for serious, potentially life-threatening infections.

Proper hand hygiene and environmental cleaning is crucial to prevent the spread of disease resulting from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as is avoiding improperly maintained pools and hot tubs. P. aeruginosa infections are typically treated with antibiotics, though increasing antibiotic-resistance of course poses a problem.

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