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Better tissue healing with disappearing hydrogels

June 9, 2014 8:06 am | by Peter Iglinski, Univ. of Rochester | News | Comments

When stem cells are used to regenerate bone tissue, many wind up migrating away from the repair site, which disrupts the healing process. But a technique employed by a Univ. of Rochester research team keeps the stem cells in place, resulting in faster and better tissue regeneration. The keyis encasing the stem cells in polymers that attract water and disappear when their work is done.

Evolution of a bimetallic nanocatalyst

June 9, 2014 7:58 am | by Lynn Yarris, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Atomic-scale snapshots of a bimetallic nanoparticle catalyst in action have provided insights that could help improve the industrial process by which fuels and chemicals are synthesized from natural gas, coal or plant biomass. A multinational laboratory collaboration has taken the most detailed look ever at the evolution of platinum/cobalt bimetallic nanoparticles during reactions in oxygen and hydrogen gases.

Seeing how a lithium-ion battery works

June 9, 2014 7:44 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT News Office | News | Comments

New observations by researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology have revealed the inner workings of a type of electrode widely used in lithium-ion batteries. The new findings explain the unexpectedly high power and long cycle life of such batteries, the researchers say.

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Short nanotubes target pancreatic cancer

June 6, 2014 10:45 am | by Mike Williams, Rice Univ. | News | Comments

Short, customized carbon nanotubes have the potential to deliver drugs to pancreatic cancer cells and destroy them from within, according to researchers at Rice Univ. and the Univ. of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Pristine nanotubes produced through a new process developed at Rice can be modified to carry drugs to tumors through gaps in blood-vessel walls that larger particles cannot fit through.

Ionic liquid boosts efficiency of carbon dioxide reduction catalyst

June 6, 2014 7:50 am | by Karen McNulty Walsh, Brookhaven National Laboratory | News | Comments

Wouldn’t it be nice to use solar- or wind-generated electricity to turn excess carbon dioxide into fuels and other useful chemicals? The process would store up the intermittent solar or wind energy in a form that could be used when and where it was needed, including in transportation applications, all while getting rid of some greenhouse gas.

Engineers develop mobile DNA test for HIV

June 6, 2014 7:31 am | by Mike Williams, Rice Univ. | News | Comments

Rice Univ. bioengineers are developing a simple, highly accurate test to detect signs of HIV and its progress in patients in resource-poor settings. The current gold standard to diagnose HIV in infants and to monitor viral load depends on laboratory equipment and technical expertise generally available only in clinics. The new research features a nucleic acid-based test that can be performed at the site of care.

Sustainable Laboratory Design and Construction

June 5, 2014 1:31 pm | by Tim Studt | Siemens Industry, Inc. | Articles | Comments

Over the past decade, it has become readily apparent that the global environment is increasingly sensitive to human activity. The effects of global warming, increasing energy costs, dramatic climate changes and shortages of raw materials, potable water and food strain the global community.

Sustainable Laboratory Design and Construction: Sustainability Basics and Design

June 5, 2014 1:13 pm | by Tim Studt | Siemens Industry, Inc. | Articles | Comments

Over the past decade, it has become readily apparent that the global environment is increasingly sensitive to human activity. The effects of global warming, increasing energy costs, dramatic climate changes and shortages of raw materials, potable water and food strain the global community.

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Sustainable Laboratory Design and Construction: LEED

June 5, 2014 12:12 pm | by Tim Studt | Siemens Industry, Inc. | Articles | Comments

LEED is a sustainability certification rating system developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). The USGBC is a private, membership-based non-profit organization that promotes sustainability in how buildings are designed, built and operated. The USGBC partners with the Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI), offering a suite of LEED professional credentials that identify expertise in the field of green building.

A battery revolution on the cheap?

June 5, 2014 11:14 am | by Michael Baum, NIST | News | Comments

Whip together an industrial waste product and a bit of plastic and you might have the recipe for the next revolution in battery technology. Scientists have combined common ingredients to make an inexpensive, high-capacity lithium-sulfur battery that can be cycled hundreds of times without losing function.

Sustainable Laboratory Design and Construction: Green Construction

June 5, 2014 10:47 am | by Tim Studt | Siemens Industry, Inc. | Articles | Comments

Building Information Modeling (BIM) software systems are utilized across a wide range of new construction facilities, including research labs, to coordinate the implementation of sustainable designs. BIM systems incorporate information from various sources into a single integrated database that is available to all participants in the design and construction process.

Sustainable Laboratory Design and Construction: Control and Monitoring

June 5, 2014 9:53 am | by Tim Studt | Siemens Industry, Inc. | Articles | Comments

Taking a cue from basic management practices, the adage that you can’t control or manage what you don’t measure or monitor is just as true in sustainability applications as it is in human relations. All the design efforts created by the architects and engineers for a sustainable research lab structure can be wasted if monitoring and control systems aren’t put in place.

Sustainable Laboratory Design and Construction: Changes and Trends

June 5, 2014 9:18 am | by Tim Studt | Siemens Industry, Inc. | Articles | Comments

The latest update seen in LEED v4 provides a small glimpse of the expected changes in where sustainability efforts will be focused over the next several years. While some of the LEED certification changes are a little bit more of the same, just reworded and retitled, changes such as the holistic approach to materials analyses, lifecycle considerations and multiple metering (monitoring) requirements establish new challenges for submitters.

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Surprisingly strong magnetic fields challenge black holes’ pull

June 5, 2014 8:13 am | by Kate Greene, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

A new study of supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies has found magnetic fields play an impressive role in the systems’ dynamics. In fact, in dozens of black holes surveyed, the magnetic field strength matched the force produced by the black holes’ powerful gravitational pull, says a team of scientists.

Drones give farmers eyes in the sky to check on crop progress

June 5, 2014 8:03 am | by Sharita Forrest, News Editor, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign | News | Comments

This growing season, crop researchers at the Univ. of Illinois are experimenting with the use of drones—unmanned aerial vehicles—on the university’s South Farms. Dennis Bowman, a crop sciences educator with U. of I. Extension, is using two drones to take aerial pictures of crops growing in research plots on the farms.

Silicon alternatives key to future computers, consumer electronics

June 5, 2014 7:54 am | by Emil Venere, Purdue Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers are reporting key milestones in developing new semiconductors to potentially replace silicon in future computer chips and for applications in flexible electronics.  Findings are detailed in three technical papers, including one focusing on a collaboration of researchers from Purdue Univ., Intel Corp. and SEMATECH. The team has demonstrated the potential promise of a 2-D semiconductor called molybdenum disulfide.

Quantum criticality observed in new class of materials

June 5, 2014 7:45 am | News | Comments

Quantum criticality, the strange electronic state that may be intimately related to high-temperature superconductivity, is notoriously difficult to study. But a new discovery of “quantum critical points” could allow physicists to develop a classification scheme for quantum criticality—the first step toward a broader explanation.

Cleaning the air with roof tiles

June 5, 2014 7:32 am | by Sean Nealon, Univ. of California, Riverside | News | Comments

A team of Univ. of California, Riverside’s Bourns College of Engineering students created a roof tile coating that when applied to an average-sized residential roof breaks down the same amount of smog-causing nitrogen oxides per year as a car driven 11,000 miles. They calculated 21 tons of nitrogen oxides would be eliminated daily if tiles on one million roofs were coated with their titanium dioxide mixture.

Sustianable Laboratory Design and Construction: Resources

June 4, 2014 4:06 pm | by Tim Studt | Siemens Industry, Inc. | Articles | Comments

Over the past decade, it has become readily apparent that the global environment is increasingly sensitive to human activity. The effects of global warming, increasing energy costs, dramatic climate changes and shortages of raw materials, potable water and food strain the global community. Here are some sustainable design resources.

Integration Realized

June 4, 2014 3:43 pm | by Paul Livingstone | Articles | Comments

Today’s smartphone is a complicated power device, using a small lithium-ion battery of about 1,400-mAh capacity to power a variety of electronic systems, including a touchscreen display, a central processing unit, antennas, speakers and a microphone. All of its components, including the materials used to build it, are optimized to perform as efficiently as possible to extend battery life.

New “Views” on Biocontainment Facility

June 4, 2014 3:35 pm | by Lindsay Hock, Managing Editor | Articles | Comments

The genesis of the Eva J. Pell Laboratory was driven by the need for high-containment lab space which, in 2006, was not available at Pennsylvania State Univ. (PSU). Numerous researchers were considering leaving the university as their research needs required a BSL-3 facility; and PSU’s leadership was determined not only to retain PIs who required these facilities, but also to emerge as a regional leader in infectious disease research.

A Shining Example for Veterinary Science

June 4, 2014 3:27 pm | by Lindsay Hock, Managing Editor | Articles | Comments

The Veterinary Biomedical and Research Building (VBRB) at Washington State Univ. (WSU) celebrates the significant achievements and contributions that hundreds of small, often unknown academic institutions make in the field of global research. Located in a rural community of less than 6,000 residents, WSU attracts world-class research faculty.

A Platinum Solution for Ocean Sciences

June 4, 2014 3:13 pm | by Lindsay Hock, Managing Editor | Articles | Comments

Researchers at leading institutions, including Scripps and Wood’s Hole, are working to understand the key processes that are driving evolution and change in world’s ocean ecosystem. The recently completed Bigelow lab is one of these places, and it reflects the latest thinking about how to conduct effective ocean research and unravel the complexities of ocean health and climate change.

2014 Laboratory of the Year Vital Stats

June 4, 2014 3:05 pm | by Lindsay Hock, Managing Editor | Articles | Comments

In its 48th year, the Laboratory of the Year Awards continue to recognize excellence in research laboratory design, planning and construction. Judging for this year’s competition took place on Thursday, February 20th and was conducted by a blue-ribbon panel of laboratory architects, engineers, equipment manufacturers, researchers and the editors of R&D Magazine and Laboratory Design Newsletter.

2014 Laboratory of the Year Judges

June 4, 2014 2:52 pm | by Lindsay Hock, Managing Editor | Articles | Comments

R&D Magazine would like to thank the judges of the 48th Laboratory of the Year competition. In its 48th year, the Laboratory of the Year Awards continue to recognize excellence in research laboratory design, planning and construction. Judging for this year’s competition took place on Thursday, February 20th and was conducted by a blue-ribbon panel lab design experts.

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