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Science Connect: GMOs Could be Nutritionally Valuable, If Not for Intense Regulations

June 23, 2015 7:47 am | by Michelle Taylor, Editor-in-Chief, Laboratory Equipment and Jon Dipierro, Multimedia Production | Videos | Comments

In this one-minute video, hear from Nina Fedoroff, the former Science and Technology advisor to U.S. Secretaries of State Condoleezza Rice and Hillary Clinton, on why she blames intense regulatory demands for the lack of nutritionally valuable GMOs.

U.N. says China to make pledge for climate treaty this month

June 5, 2015 12:03 am | by Cara Anna, Associated Press | News | Comments

China is expected this month to formally submit its pledge for a global climate treaty that...

To fight bee decline, Obama proposes more land to feed bees

May 19, 2015 2:04 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

A new federal plan aims to reverse America's declining honeybee and monarch butterfly...

How Academic Institutions Partner with Private Industry

April 20, 2015 9:41 am | by Janet Corzo, AIA, Associate, Perkins Eastman | Articles | Comments

Partnerships between universities and businesses are nothing new, but these partnerships have...

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Specialty, generic drug costs drive Medicaid costs up

April 11, 2015 2:04 pm | by Marie French, Associated Press | News | Comments

The high cost of a drug used to treat Medicaid patients with hepatitis C drew scrutiny from lawmakers earlier this year, but other drugs are also driving up the state's costs and likely will continue to do so for several years, government data reveals. From fiscal year 2010 through 2014, drug costs for Missouri's Medicaid program rose 33%, to $1.16 billion.

U.S. pledges to cut emissions in global treaty

April 1, 2015 8:32 am | by Josh Lederman, Associated Press | News | Comments

The U.S. pledged to cut its greenhouse gas emissions up to 28% as part of a global treaty aimed at preventing the worst effects of climate change, the White House said. The Obama administration's contribution to the treaty, which world leaders expect to finalize in December, codifies a commitment President Barack Obama first made late last year in Beijing.

Do biofuel policies seek to cut emissions by cutting food?

March 30, 2015 7:36 am | by Catherine Zandonella, Princeton Univ. | News | Comments

A study found government biofuel policies rely on reductions in food consumption to generate greenhouse gas savings. Shrinking the amount of food that people and livestock eat decreases the amount of carbon dioxide that they breathe out or excrete as waste. The reduction in food available for consumption, rather than any inherent fuel efficiency, drives the decline in carbon dioxide emissions in government models, the researchers found.

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Do government technology investments pay off?

March 27, 2015 8:08 am | by Greta Guest, Univ. of Michigan | News | Comments

Studies confirm that IT investments in companies improve productivity and efficiency. Univ. of Michigan professor M.S. Krishnan wondered if the same was true for government. After all, IT spending could either lead to efficiency or create bureaucratic bloat.

FDA approves genetically engineered potatoes, apples

March 20, 2015 2:06 pm | by Mary Clare Jalonick And Keith Ridler, Associated Press | News | Comments

Potatoes that won't bruise and apples that won't brown are a step closer to U.S. grocery store aisles. The federal Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved the genetically engineered foods, saying they are "as safe and nutritious as their conventional counterparts."

U.S. climate change envoy: China, U.S. working closer on deal

March 20, 2015 6:04 am | by Jack Chang, Associated Press | News | Comments

A U.S. envoy for climate change said Friday that China and the U.S. are working more closely than ever ahead of a conference this year in Paris that raises hopes for a global plan to cut greenhouse emissions. Special Envoy Todd Stern told reporters in Beijing that he still expects hard negotiations between many countries in advance of the U.N. summit.

Prices of cancer drugs have soared since 1995

March 18, 2015 7:37 am | by Peter Dizikes, MIT News Office | News | Comments

The prices of leading cancer drugs have risen at rates far outstripping inflation over the last two decades, according to a new study co-authored by an Massachusetts Institute of Technology economist. But the exact reasons for the cost increases are unclear. Since 1995, a group of 58 leading cancer drugs has increased in price by 10% annually, even when adjusted for inflation and incremental health benefits, the study finds.

Study calls heart imaging into question for mild chest pain

March 14, 2015 2:05 pm | by Marilynn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

A big federal study finds that people who see a doctor for chest pain have no less risk of suffering a heart attack, dying or being hospitalized later if they are checked with a fancy newer type of CT scan rather than a simple treadmill test or other older exam. CT scans, a type of x-ray that gives a very detailed look at heart arteries, have been used for about a decade without evidence they are better or worse than older tests.

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Specialty drugs drive prescription spending jump

March 10, 2015 1:43 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Prescription drugs spending jumped 13 percent last year, the biggest annual increase since 2003, according to the nation's largest pharmacy benefits manager.                 

Apple Watch anticipation: features, functions unveiled

March 9, 2015 11:35 am | by Anick Jesdanun, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

CEO Tim Cook is expected to unveil the company's newest device and make the case for why it's a must-have gadget at a San Francisco event later Monday.                  

Heart-on-a-chip Aids Drug Screening

March 9, 2015 8:00 am | by UC Berkeley | News | Comments

Bioengineers are presenting a network of pulsating cardiac muscle cells housed in an inch-long silicone device that effectively models human heart tissue. They have demonstrated the viability of this system as a drug-screening tool by testing it with cardiovascular medications.  

N. Korea bars tourists from marathon over Ebola concerns

February 22, 2015 11:06 pm | by Eric Talmadge, Associated Press | News | Comments

North Korean authorities are barring foreigners from this year's Pyongyang marathon, a popular tourist event, amid ongoing Ebola travel restrictions, the head of a travel agency that specializes in the country said Monday. Nick Bonner, co-founder of Beijing-based Koryo Tours, said more than 400 foreign runners had signed up with his agency alone for the event, which is to be held April 12.

HTTP Gets an Update

February 19, 2015 2:00 pm | by The Conversation, Peter Maynard | News | Comments

Hypertext Transfer Protocol, HTTP, is a key component of the World Wide Web. It is the communications layer through which web browsers request web pages from web servers and with which web servers respond with the contents of the page. Like much of the internet it’s been around for decades, but a recent announcement reveals that HTTP/2, the first major update in 15 years, is about to arrive.  

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Washington state panel mulls bill to trim vaccine exemptions

February 17, 2015 4:28 pm | by Rachel La Corte,Associated Press | News | Comments

Personal or philosophical opposition to vaccines would not be an authorized exemption for the parents of school-age children under a measure that received a public hearing before a House committee on Tuesday, drawing at least two dozen opponents to the proposed change.

Vaccine opposition has ebbed and flowed over centuries

February 14, 2015 3:49 am | by Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

They're considered one of mankind's greatest medical achievements, yet people have balked at vaccines almost since the time of the first vaccination—in 1796, when an English country doctor named Edward Jenner inoculated an 8-year-old boy against smallpox. In the mid-1800s, people protested in the streets of Victorian England after the British government began requiring citizens to get the vaccination.

Are You a Security Risk for Your Company?

February 13, 2015 7:00 am | News | Comments

Phishing emails are more and more common as entry points for hackers— unwittingly clicking on a link in a scam email could unleash malware into a network or provide other access to cyberthieves. A growing number of companies, including Twitter Inc., are giving their workers' a pop quiz, testing security savvy by sending spoof phishing emails to see who bites.

New Agency to Fight Cyberthreats

February 12, 2015 7:00 am | by Associated Press, Ken Dilanian | News | Comments

The White House is setting up a new agency designed to coordinate cyberthreat intelligence that currently is spread across the federal government. The agency will be modeled after the National Counter Terrorism Center, which was established after 9/11 to coordinate terrorism intelligence.

Debate over vaccine requirements forges strange alliance

February 6, 2015 1:13 pm | by Nicholas Riccardi, Associated Press | News | Comments

The debate over whether parents should be required to get their children vaccinated against measles has created strange alliances, putting some liberal parents on the same side as Republican conservatives. While the two parties are not cleanly divided on the issue in the nation's state legislatures, it is increasingly the GOP that resists efforts to stiffen requirements on vaccinating kids.

U.S. to destroy its largest remaining chemical weapons cache

February 4, 2015 3:17 am | by Dan Elliott, Associated Press | News | Comments

The United States is about to begin destroying its largest remaining stockpile of chemical-laden artillery shells, marking a milestone in the global campaign to eradicate a debilitating weapon that still creeps into modern wars. The Pueblo Chemical Depot in southern Colorado plans to start neutralizing 2,600 tons of aging mustard agent in March as the U.S. moves toward complying with a 1997 treaty banning all chemical weapons.

Federal health officials face tough questions on flu vaccine

February 3, 2015 1:20 pm | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

Federal health officials are facing questioning about why this year's flu vaccine isn't giving good protection against the winter menace. This is a particularly bad flu season, and one reason is that the most common flu strain isn't a good match to this year's vaccine. Lawmakers on Tuesday asked why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention didn't act months ago when concerns first arose to create a better-matched vaccine.

Top 10 challenges facing global pharmaceutical supply chains

February 3, 2015 8:25 am | by Robert Polner, New York Univ. | News | Comments

Ten years after the 2005 Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness reported on the need for better coordination in the global fight against disease, global pharmaceutical supply chains remain fragmented and lack coordination, facing at least 10 fundamental challenges, according to a newly published paper.

State drilling panel weighs disclosure of fracking chemicals

February 2, 2015 7:19 pm | by Dan Elliott, Associated Press | News | Comments

Gov. John Hickenlooper's task force on oil and gas discussed proposals Monday that would force energy companies to disclose all the chemicals they use in hydraulic fracturing and give local governments more of a say on where wells can be drilled. The task force is winnowing down a list of 56 suggestions from members before making its recommendations to Hickenlooper on ways to resolve disputes over local control and landowner rights.

Obama proposes "precision medicine" to end one-size-fits-all

January 30, 2015 6:18 am | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

President Barack Obama is calling for an investment to move away from one-size-fits-all-medicine, toward an approach that tailors treatment to your genes. The White House said Friday that Obama will ask Congress for $215 million for what he's calling a precision medicine initiative. The ambitious goal: Scientists will assemble databases of about a million volunteers to study their genetics to learn how to individualize care.

Detecting chemical weapons with a color-changing film

January 29, 2015 8:39 am | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

In today’s world, in which the threat of terrorism looms, there is an urgent need for fast, reliable tools to detect the release of deadly chemical warfare agents (CWAs). In ACS Macro Letters, scientists are reporting new progress toward thin-film materials that could rapidly change colors in the presence of CWAs.

After oil spill, company says new line will be safer

January 23, 2015 2:17 pm | by Matthew Brown, Associated Press | News | Comments

A Wyoming company said Friday it will replace a pipeline that spilled almost 40,000 gallons of oil into a river in Montana with a new line buried more deeply to protect against future accidents. The Jan. 17 spill into the Yellowstone River contaminated the water supply for 6,000 residents of Glendive in eastern Montana.

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