Advertisement
Information Technologies
Subscribe to Information Technologies
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Power Outages Limit Tech’s Ability to Help People Connect After Quake

April 27, 2015 10:06 am | by Associated Press, Foster Klug | News | Comments

Power outages and communications problems have made life agonizing for the nearly 6 million Nepalese who live abroad— or about 22 percent of the population. They try desperately to reach loved ones through cellphones and global messaging apps, only to be met with silence or fleeting connections. The impoverished country’s communications have been shaken back to a different era.

Why Drafting Standards Play a Vital Role in Engineering Communication?

April 24, 2015 9:10 am | by Gaurang Trivedi, Engineering Consultant, TrueCADD | Articles | Comments

Engineering drawings remain at a core for any manufacturing organization as they communicate ideas that are expected to be transformed into a profitable product. Most companies begin developing engineering drawings using international drafting standards. However, with the course of time, and as the idea begins to shape up, there’s always a deviation from the standards followed.

Researchers use novel polarization to increase data speeds

April 24, 2015 7:53 am | by Jay Mwamba, The City College of New York | News | Comments

As the world’s exponentially growing demand for digital data slows the Internet and cell phone communication, City College of New York researchers may have just figured out a new way to increase its speed.

Advertisement

Breaking Down Barriers: Streamlining Data Management to Boost Knowledge Sharing

April 23, 2015 3:10 pm | by Ian Peirson, Senior Solutions Consultant, IDBS | Articles | Comments

Research in the pharmaceutical and industrial science industries has become increasingly global, multidisciplinary and data-intensive. This is made clear by the evolution in patent approvals, which can also be considered a reliable measure of innovation in these industries. Innovation itself is a cumulative effect, which requires access to multiple fragments of knowledge from disparate sources and exchange of technology and ideas.

Gamers feel the glove

April 23, 2015 7:51 am | by Mike Williams, Rice Univ. | Videos | Comments

Rice Univ. engineering students are working to make virtual reality a little more real with their invention of a glove that allows a user to feel what they’re touching while gaming. The Hands Omni glove developed at Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen will provide a way for gamers and others to feel the environments they inhabit through the likes of 3-D heads-ups displays.

Google wireless phone service challenges major carriers

April 22, 2015 6:03 pm | by Michael Liedtke, AP Technology Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

Google is trying to shake up the wireless phone industry with a low-priced service designed to pressure major carriers into making it more affordable for people to get online and use Google's services. The service, called "Project Fi," debuted Wednesday, about two months after Google revealed its plans to expand its ever-growing empire into providing wireless connections for smartphones.

Putting a new spin on computing memory

April 22, 2015 11:23 am | by Britt Faulstick, Drexel Univ. | News | Comments

Ever since computers have been small enough to be fixtures on desks and laps, their central processing has functioned something like an atomic Etch A Sketch, with electromagnetic fields pushing data bits into place to encode data. Unfortunately, the same drawbacks and perils of the mechanical sketch board have been just as pervasive in computing.

Testing brain activity to identify cybersecurity threats

April 22, 2015 10:37 am | by Angie Hunt, Iowa State Univ. | News | Comments

The old adage that a chain is only as strong as its weakest link certainly applies to the risk organizations face in defending against cybersecurity threats. Employees pose a danger that can be just as damaging as a hacker. Iowa State Univ. researchers are working to better understand these internal threats by getting inside the minds of employees who put their company at risk.

Advertisement

Researchers inform development of Ebola vaccine trials

April 21, 2015 11:58 am | by Faith Singer-Villalobos, Univ. of Texas at Austin | News | Comments

As the current Ebola outbreak wanes, scientists have to make the most of every opportunity to prepare for future outbreaks. One such opportunity involves the identification of a safe and effective Ebola vaccine. Texas supercomputers have aided researchers in modeling which types of clinical trials will provide the best information.

Innovation boosts Wi-Fi bandwidth ten-fold

April 21, 2015 8:39 am | by Rachel Robertson, Oregon State Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers at Oregon State Univ. have invented a new technology that can increase the bandwidth of Wi-Fi systems by 10 times, using LED lights to transmit information. The technology could be integrated with existing Wi-Fi systems to reduce bandwidth problems in crowded locations, such as airport terminals or coffee shops, and in homes where several people have multiple Wi-Fi devices.

Better battery imaging paves way for renewable energy future

April 21, 2015 8:04 am | by Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

In a move that could improve the energy storage of everything from portable electronics to electric microgrids, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison and Brookhaven National Laboratory researchers have developed a novel x-ray imaging technique to visualize and study the electrochemical reactions in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries containing a new type of material, iron fluoride.

Electronic device performance enhanced with new transistor encasing method

April 21, 2015 7:50 am | by Austin Keating, News Bureau Intern, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign | News | Comments

A more effective method for closing gaps in atomically small wires has been developed by Univ. of Illinois researchers, further opening the doors to a new transistor technology. Silicon-based transistors have been the foundation of modern electronics for more than half a century. A new transistor technology, carbon nanotube wires, shows promise in replacing silicon because it can operate ten times as fast and is more flexible.

Deadline Extended for 2015 R&D 100 Award Entries

April 20, 2015 1:53 pm | by Lindsay Hock, Editor | News | Comments

The editors of R&D Magazine have announced a deadline extension for the 2015 R&D 100 Awards entry process until May 18, 2015. The R&D 100 Awards have a 50 plus year history of awarding the 100 most technologically significant products of the year.

Advertisement

Chinese Awards Part 2

April 20, 2015 12:34 pm | by Tim Studt | Blogs | Comments

Tim Studt here again, and mostly recovered from my day-long travel on Friday. Hot and humid here in Taipei, about 25 F warmer than in Chicago. Today's judging at the Taiwan Excellence Awards covered healthcare-based tablet computers, electronic memory modules, top-end gaming computers, electric scooters, racing bicycles and even off-road mountain racing bike tires.

New tactic targets brain tumors

April 20, 2015 11:41 am | by Mike Williams, Rice Univ. | Videos | Comments

Drugs that target insulin pathways to slow or stop the growth of brain tumors are going in the right direction, but appear to be on the wrong track, according to new research. Through detailed computer models and experiments on two distinct glioblastoma cell types, the researchers have found reason to believe therapies that attack the insulin signaling pathway thought to influence tumor development have had mixed results in trials.

Advances in molecular electronics

April 20, 2015 10:27 am | by Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf | News | Comments

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and the Univ. of Konstanz are working on storing and processing information on the level of single molecules to create the smallest possible components that will combine autonomously to form a circuit. As recently reported in Advanced Science, the researchers can switch on the current flow through a single molecule for the first time with the help of light.

Chinese Awards

April 20, 2015 9:56 am | by Tim Studt | Blogs | Comments

Tim Studt here in Taipei judging the 23rd annual Taiwan Excellence Awards with seven other judges from Germany, Japan and Taiwan academia. Sponsored by the Taiwan Ministry of Economic Affairs, these awards were developed to encourage Taiwan companies to incorporate innovation and value into their products. Selection of winners are based on R&D, design, quality and marketing/branding.

Technology can transfer human emotions to your palm through air

April 20, 2015 8:03 am | by Univ. of Sussex | Videos | Comments

Human emotion can be transferred by technology that stimulates different parts of the hand without making physical contact with your body, a Univ. of Sussex-led study has shown. Sussex scientist Dr. Marianna Obrist has pinpointed how next-generation technologies can stimulate different areas of the hand to convey feelings of, for example, happiness, sadness, excitement or fear.

Researcher studies the hacker mind

April 20, 2015 7:46 am | by Case Western Reserve Univ. | News | Comments

Timothy Summers is providing a better understanding about how hackers think through his research and newly formed startup, Summers & Co. LLC, designed to improve cybersecurity. Located in Silver Spring, Md., Summers & Co. assists businesses, governments and other organizations to protect data.

Thumbnail track pad

April 17, 2015 7:36 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT News Office | Videos | Comments

Researchers are developing a new wearable device that turns the user’s thumbnail into a miniature wireless track pad. They envision that the technology could let users control wireless devices when their hands are full: answering the phone while cooking, for instance. It could also augment other interfaces, allowing someone texting on a cellphone, say, to toggle between symbol sets without interrupting his or her typing.

Solidifying Image Acquisition

April 16, 2015 2:53 pm | by Lindsay Hock, Editor | Articles | Comments

Image analysis is of growing importance in science, and trends are observed for different layers of image acquisition. Quantifiable and reproducible data is a prerequisite for scientific publications. And, today, it isn’t sufficient to just acquire aesthetically pleasing images with a microscope. To get powerful scientific results, scientists must get as much information as they can from an image.

A camera that powers itself

April 15, 2015 10:03 am | by Holy Evarts, Columbia Univ. School of Engineering and Applied Science | News | Comments

A Columbia Engineering research team has invented a prototype video camera that is the first to be fully self-powered: It can produce an image each second, indefinitely, of a well-lit indoor scene. They designed a pixel that can not only measure incident light but also convert the incident light into electric power.

Quantum cryptography at the speed of light

April 15, 2015 8:11 am | by Marit Mitchell, Senior Communications Office, Univ. of Toronto | News | Comments

Imagine having your MRI results sent directly to your phone, with no concern over the security of your private health data. Or knowing your financial information was safe on a server halfway around the world. Or sending highly sensitive business correspondence, without worrying that it would fall into the wrong hands.

Spitzer, OGLE spot planet deep within our galaxy

April 15, 2015 7:44 am | by Christine Pulliam, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics | News | Comments

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has teamed up with a telescope on the ground to find a remote gas planet about 13,000 light-years away, making it one of the most distant planets known. The discovery demonstrates that Spitzer can be used to help solve the puzzle of how planets are distributed throughout our flat, spiral-shaped Milky Way galaxy. Are they concentrated heavily in its central hub, or more evenly spread throughout its suburbs?

On the road to spin-orbitronics

April 14, 2015 7:55 am | by Lynn Yarris, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Few among us may know what magnetic domains are, but we make use of them daily when we email files, post images or download music or video to our personal devices. Now a team of researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has found a new way of manipulating the walls that define these magnetic domains and the results could one day revolutionize the electronics industry.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading