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How to Form an Engineering Simulation Plan

June 4, 2014 1:42 pm | by Nicholas M. Veikos, President, CAE Associates Inc., Middlebury, Conn. | Articles | Comments

Upon introducing engineering simulation into an organization, it’s important to formulate an implementation plan. Simply telling the engineering team to “have at it” doesn’t generally lead to positive results. Every plan will be different, but all can benefit from some basic considerations.

Optimizing Graphene Characterization

June 4, 2014 12:41 pm | by Lishan Weng, Applications Engineer, Keithley Instruments Inc. | Articles | Comments

Before 2004, when Geim and Novoselov demonstrated the existence of graphene, a single-atomic-layer-thick crystal of carbon, physicists didn’t believe such a substance could exist. Since then, graphene has attracted tremendous research interest because of its exceptional physical and electrical properties.

App paired with sensor measures stress and delivers advice to cope in real time

June 4, 2014 12:21 pm | News | Comments

Computer scientists at Microsoft Research and the University of California, San Diego have developed a system, called ParentGuardian, that combines a mobile application and sensor to detect stress in parents. The system, initially tested on parents of children with ADHD, delivers research-based strategies to help decrease stress during emotionally charged interactions with children.

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Leaving Paper Behind

June 4, 2014 12:15 pm | by Trish Meek, Director of Product Strategy, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Philadelphia, Pa. | Thermo Fisher Scientific | Articles | Comments

After another year of flat spending in 2013, global investment in R&D is forecast to grow by 3.8% to $1.6 trillion in 2014, according the annual R&D Magazine Global Funding Forecast. In the U.S., federal spending is forecast to increase modestly (1.5%), another promising sign, but it’s fair to say the pressure is still on to do more with less, particularly in Big Pharma where recent R&D cuts have been the most dramatic.

Increasing Productivity and Efficiency in the Lab

June 4, 2014 11:58 am | by Daniela Jansen, PhD, Product Marketing Manager, Dassault Systèmes BIOVIA (formerly Accelrys) | Articles | Comments

Pharmaceutical companies are constantly seeking ways to improve efficiency in order to increase productivity, all while speeding up innovation and protecting intellectual property (IP). The use of mobile applications (apps) in the laboratory has been investigated as a means to achieve these goals. By allowing scientists to move freely around the laboratory, mobile apps add value to suboptimal processes requiring non-value-added steps.

Safety Is Key When Planning for U.S. High-speed Rail Lines

June 4, 2014 11:46 am | by Xavier Fornari, Product Marketing Manager, ANSYS, Elancourt, France | Articles | Comments

High-speed rail is a frequently discussed topic, but one that has yet to become a reality in the U.S. A number of states and regions in the U.S. including Texas, California, the Pacific Northwest and Minnesota, to name a few, have planned projects to bring high-speed rail to fruition.

Retaining Knowledge After an Engineer Leaves

June 4, 2014 11:31 am | by Paul Goossens, VP of Engineering Solutions, Maplesoft | Articles | Comments

If a senior engineer left an organization suddenly, how many hours would it take for the engineering team to take over his projects, confident that they understand not only the designs, but why those designs are the way they are? The typical answer is “far too many”. Widespread use of CAE and data management tools have made this task much easier than before, but these tools do little to record the thinking behind the results.

Proactive approach to detect malicious software in networked computers and data

June 4, 2014 10:12 am | News | Comments

Highlighting the impact of malicious software, Target suffered the largest retail hack in U.S. history during the Christmas shopping season of 2013. To help combat this worsening trend, Virginia Tech computer scientists have used causal relations to determine whether or not network activities have justifiable and legitimate causes to occur. The work effectively isolates infected computer hosts and detects in advance stealthy malware.

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NASA snaps cosmic color portrait “and then some”

June 4, 2014 9:56 am | News | Comments

A new NASA panorama looking deep and far into the universe for the first time includes ultraviolet light, which is normally not visible to the human eye. It shows up in the photo as bright baby blue with spinning galaxies, which are about 5 to 10 billion years old. The photo is a composite of more than 800 photos taken by Hubble and shows about 10,000 multi-colored galaxies.

New prototype transistor consumes little power

June 4, 2014 7:37 am | News | Comments

The basic element of modern electronics, namely the transistor, suffers from significant current leakage. By enveloping a transistor with a shell of piezoelectric material, which distorts when voltage is applied, researchers in the Netherlands were able to reduce this leakage by a factor of five compared to a transistor without this material.

Controlling thermal conductivities can improve energy storage

June 4, 2014 7:30 am | by Rick Kubetz, Univ. of Illinois | News | Comments

Materials that control heat flow are available with both high and low conductivities, but materials with variable and reversible thermal conductivities are rare. For the first time, researchers at the Univ. of Illinois have experimentally shown that the thermal conductivity of lithium cobalt oxide, an important material for electrochemical energy storage, can be reversibly electrochemically modulated over a considerable range.

Physicists take quantum leap toward ultra-precise measurement

June 3, 2014 11:20 am | News | Comments

For the first time, physicists in Canada have been able to conduct measurements using photons at a resolution unattainable according to classical physics. Their work used quantum entangled photons to increase photon throughput in interferometers to increase measurement resolution. The effort depended on a new way to employ multiple detectors in order to measure photons in entangled states.

Lasers and night-vision technology help improve imaging of hidden lymphatic system

June 3, 2014 11:14 am | News | Comments

The human lymphatic system is a poorly understood circulatory system consisting of tiny vessels spread throughout the body. These vessels are filled with lymph, a clear liquid that lacks the natural contrast needed to show up on CT scanners or MRIs. A new technology developed in Texas can non-invasively image the human lymphatic system using a fluorescent dye, commercial laser dioded, and military-grade night vision devices.

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Researchers predict the electrical response of metals to extreme pressures

June 3, 2014 10:50 am | News | Comments

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute scientists have developed a method that can predict how subjecting metals to severe pressure can lower their electrical resistance. The finding which involved theoretical predictions, use of a supercomputer, and equipment capable of exerting pressures up to 40,000 atmospheres, could have applications in computer chips and other materials that could benefit from specific electrical resistance.

Computer scientists develop tool to make the Internet of Things safer

June 3, 2014 9:40 am | by Ioana Patringenaru, Jacobs School of Engineering | News | Comments

Computer scientists at the Univ. of California, San Diego have developed a tool that allows hardware designers and system builders to test security—a first for the field. There is a big push to create the so-called Internet of Things, where all devices are connected and communicate with one another. As a result, embedded systems—small computer systems built around microcontrollers—are becoming more common.

Discovery sheds light on how to control self-assembly process

June 3, 2014 8:35 am | News | Comments

Imagine a tower that builds itself into the desired structure only by choosing the appropriate bricks. Absurd, but in the nano world self-assembly is now a common practice for forming structures. Researchers in Austria have been investigating how they can control the ordering of self-assembling structures and discovered how to switch the assembly process on and off.

Apple expands into health, home with new software

June 3, 2014 8:20 am | by Michael Liedtke, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

New tools for tracking health and controlling household appliances are part of updated operating systems that Apple unveiled Monday in San Francisco at its 25th annual conference for application developers. The company is expanding into home and health management as the company tries to turn its iPhones, iPads and Mac computers into an interchangeable network of devices that serve as a hub of people's increasingly digital lives.

Simple sewing machine has high-tech role in future “soft” machines

June 3, 2014 7:50 am | by Emil Venere, Purdue Univ. | News | Comments

The humble sewing machine could play a key role in creating "soft" robotics, wearable electronics and implantable medical systems made of elastic materials that are capable of extreme stretching. New stretchable technologies could lead to innovations including robots that have human-like sensory skin and synthetic muscles and flexible garments that people might wear to interact with computers or for therapeutic purposes.

A fuel cell for the home

June 3, 2014 6:58 am | News | Comments

Researchers in Europe have designed a new type of fuel cell that is much simpler and can be mounted on a wall and used in a home. Designed with heater manufacturer Vaillant, the compact and safe system is based on solid fuel cell technology and generates electricity and heat from natural gas. With an output of 1 kW, it provides the average current consumption for a four-person household.

Solar Impulse 2 makes maiden flight

June 2, 2014 9:20 am | Videos | Comments

A Swiss-made solar-powered aircraft has made a successful inaugural flight as its makers prepare for what they hope will be the first round-the-world solar flight. The aircraft spent 2 hours and 17 minutes in the air above western Switzerland early Monday. The Solar Impulse 2 is a bigger and better version of a single-seat prototype that first took flight five years ago and can theoretically stay airborne indefinitely.

Observing the random diffusion of missing atoms in graphene

May 30, 2014 10:58 am | News | Comments

Imperfections in the regular atomic arrangements in crystals determine many of the properties of a material, and their diffusion is behind many microstructural changes in solids. However, imaging non-repeating atomic arrangements is difficult in conventional materials. Now, researchers in Austria have directly imaged the diffusion of a butterfly-shaped atomic defect in graphene.

Rush a light wave and you’ll break its data

May 30, 2014 10:44 am | News | Comments

Scientists at NIST and the Joint Quantum Institute have shown how attempts to "push" part of a light beam past the speed of light results in the loss of the quantum data the light carries. The results could clarify how noise might limit the transfer of information in quantum computers.

Think fast, robot

May 30, 2014 9:01 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT News Office | News | Comments

One of the reasons we don’t yet have self-driving cars and miniature helicopters delivering online purchases is that autonomous vehicles tend not to perform well under pressure. A system that can flawlessly parallel park at 5 mph may have trouble avoiding obstacles at 35 mph. Part of the problem is the time it takes to produce and interpret camera data.

SpaceX finishes qualification testing for 3-D printed rocket engine

May 30, 2014 8:58 am | Videos | Comments

The SuperDraco thruster, an engine that will power SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft to orbit, has completed a test regimen held over the last month at SpaceX’s Rocket Development Facility in Texas. This qualification test involves a variety of conditions conditions including multiple starts, extended firing durations and extreme off-nominal propellant flow and temperatures.

Zeroing in on the proton's magnetic moment

May 30, 2014 8:32 am | News | Comments

As part of a series of experiments designed to resolve one of the deepest mysteries of physics today, researchers have made the most precise ever direct measurement of the magnetic moment of a proton. The measurement, based on spectroscopy of a single particle in a Penning trap, was completed at a fractional precision of 3 parts per billion, improving the 42-year-old "fundamental constant" by a factor of three.

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