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A stretchable highway for light

February 20, 2014 2:53 am | News | Comments

A team of Belgian researchers have made what may be the first optical circuit that uses interconnections that are not only bendable, but also stretchable. These new interconnections, made of a rubbery transparent material called PDMS, guide light along their path even when stretched up to 30% and when bent around an object the diameter of a human finger.

Whole genome analysis, stat

February 19, 2014 11:19 pm | News | Comments

The time and cost of sequencing an entire human genome has plummeted, but analyzing three billion base pairs from a single genome can take many months. However, a Univ. of Chicago-based team working with Beagle, one of the world's fastest supercomputers devoted to life sciences, reports that genome analysis can be radically accelerated. The Argonne National Laboratory computer is able to analyze 240 full genomes in about two days.

Team develops multi-scale simulation software for chemistry research

February 19, 2014 11:00 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at the San Diego Supercomputer Center have developed software that greatly expands the types of multi-scale QM/MM (mixed quantum and molecular mechanical) simulations of complex chemical systems that scientists can use to design new drugs, better chemicals or improved enzymes for biofuels production.

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Using holograms to improve electronic devices

February 19, 2014 3:02 pm | by Sean Nealon, Univ. of California, Riverside | News | Comments

A team of researchers has demonstrated a new type of holographic memory device that could provide unprecedented data storage capacity and data processing capabilities in electronic devices. The new type of memory device uses spin waves, a collective oscillation of spins in magnetic materials, instead of the optical beams.

Silicon-germanium chip sets new speed record

February 19, 2014 2:42 pm | by Rick Robinson, Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

A research collaboration consisting of IHP-Innovations for High Performance Microelectronics in Germany and the Georgia Institute of Technology has demonstrated the world's fastest silicon-based device to date. The investigators operated a silicon-germanium (SiGe) transistor at 798 GHz fMAX, exceeding the previous speed record for silicon-germanium chips by about 200 GHz.

Single chip devices to provide real-time 3-D imaging from inside heart

February 19, 2014 11:17 am | by John Toon, Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Researchers have developed the technology for a catheter-based device that would provide forward-looking, real-time, 3-D imaging from inside the heart, coronary arteries and peripheral blood vessels. With its volumetric imaging, the new device could better guide surgeons working in the heart, and potentially allow more of patients’ clogged arteries to be cleared without major surgery.

Report: Federal support enabled 22 major technology advances

February 19, 2014 9:52 am | by Information Technology and Innovation Foundation | News | Comments

A new report examines 22 cases of successful U.S. innovation in which the development of key foundational technologies stemmed at least in part from federal investment in research and development (R&D). The cases cover technologies developed across a wide range of fields over the past half century, from information and communications technology, energy and health care to transportation, agriculture and mathematics.

Controlling magnetism with an electric field

February 19, 2014 8:16 am | by Marie Guma-Diaz and Annette Gallagher UM News | News | Comments

There is a big effort in industry to produce electrical devices with more and faster memory and logic. Magnetic memory elements, such as in a hard drive, and in the future in what is called MRAM (magnetic random access memory), use electrical currents to encode information. However, the heat which is generated is a significant problem, since it limits the density of devices and hence the performance of computer chips.

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CASL, Westinghouse simulate neutron behavior in AP1000 reactor core

February 19, 2014 8:06 am | News | Comments

Scientists and engineers developing more accurate approaches to analyzing nuclear power reactors have successfully tested a new suite of computer codes that closely model neutronics, the behavior of neutrons in a reactor core. A team from Westinghouse used the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications core simulator (VERA-CS) to analyze its AP1000 advanced pressurized water reactor (PWR).

Smarter caching

February 19, 2014 7:32 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Computer chips keep getting faster because transistors keep getting smaller. But the chips themselves are as big as ever, so data moving around the chip, and between chips and main memory, has to travel just as far. As transistors get faster, the cost of moving data becomes, proportionally, a more severe limitation. So far, chip designers have circumvented that limitation through the use of “caches”.

Rife with hype, exoplanet study needs patience and refinement

February 19, 2014 7:30 am | by Morgan Kelly, Princeton Univ. | News | Comments

The dominant methods for studying exoplanet atmospheres are not intended for objects as distant, dim and complex as planets trillions of miles from Earth. Few “hard facts” about exoplanet atmospheres have been collected since the first planet was detected in 1992, and most of the data is of “marginal utility.” An exoplanet expert is now calling for initiatives that will help scientists develop tools to detect and analyze exoplanet spectra.

Scientists successfully test code that models neutrons in reactor core

February 19, 2014 7:15 am | News | Comments

Technical staff at Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, supported by a light water reactor research team at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, have used a new core simulator to analyze its AP1000 advanced pressurized water reactor. The testing focused on modeling the startup conditions and its “neutronics”: the behavior of neutrons in a reactor core.

Engineers in Korea develop head-mounted display with augmented reality chip

February 18, 2014 11:15 am | News | Comments

Researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have made a low-powered, high-speed, head-mounted display device they are calling K-Glass. This wearable electronic display has an augmented reality processor that enables users to do things like browse the menu, food and available tables of a restaurant simply by walking up to it and looking at its name.

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Computer whizzes brainstorm for cash at hackathons

February 18, 2014 10:42 am | by Martha Mendoza, AP National Writer | News | Comments

Computer programming competitions known as "hackathons" have spread like viruses in recent years as ways for geeks, nerds and designers to get together to eat pizza, lose sleep and create something new. The marathon brainstorming sessions are focused on everything from developing apps to using computer code to solve the world's problems. This year a record 1,500 hackathons are planned around the globe, up from just a handful in 2010.

Researchers build world’s most powerful terahertz laser chip

February 18, 2014 10:08 am | News | Comments

One of the main challenges for engineers trying to make practical terahertz wave devices is making the lasers powerful and compact enough to be useful. Engineers in the U.K. have reported their new quantum cascade terahertz laser exceeds 1 W output power. The new record more than doubles landmarks set by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and subsequently by a team from Vienna last year.

Study: Arctic getting darker, making Earth warmer

February 18, 2014 8:39 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The Arctic isn't nearly as bright and white as it used to be because of more ice melting in the ocean, and that's turning out to be a global problem, a new study says. With more dark, open water in the summer, less of the sun's heat is reflected back into space. So the entire Earth is absorbing much more heat than expected.

Why Big Data Isn’t the Big Problem for Genomic Medicine

February 14, 2014 12:07 pm | by Michael Groner, VP of engineering and chief architect, and Trevor Heritage, VP of corporate development and strategy, Appistry Inc. | Articles | Comments

Buzzwords, like a virus, spread inexorably from discipline to discipline. Take “big data,” which originated in supercomputing and now has infected finance, logistics, intelligence and defense and life science. Is there some rule requiring every presentation on genomics to include a slide comparing sequencing costs to Moore’s Law, followed by slides lamenting how much data we are producing and the resources required to act on it?

NJIT visualizes impact of electrical engineering on society

February 14, 2014 11:37 am | News | Comments

For aspiring electrical engineers, New Jersey Institute of Technology has pulled together in one “tall” infographic a brief history of the breakthroughs and impact of electrical engineering advances since the 1830s, when the telegraph marked the first time that electric currents were used to transmit messages. Since then, electrical devices have a dramatic effect on our daily lives.

Robotic construction crew needs no foreman

February 14, 2014 8:42 am | by Caroline Perry, Harvard Univ. | News | Comments

Inspired by the termites’ resilience and collective intelligence, a team of computer scientists and engineers at Harvard Univ. has created an autonomous robotic construction crew. The system needs no supervisor, no eye in the sky and no communication. Exhibiting a swarm-like intelligence, these robots, in any number, can cooperate simply by modifying their environment.

The physics of curly hair

February 14, 2014 8:23 am | by Denise Brehm, Civil and Environmental Engineering | News | Comments

The heroes and villains in animated films tend to be on opposite ends of the moral spectrum. But they’re often similar in their hair, which is usually extremely rigid or straight and swings to and fro. It’s rare to see an animated character with bouncy, curly hair, since computer animators don’t have a simple mathematical means for describing it. That is, until now.

Superbright and fast x-rays image single layer of proteins

February 13, 2014 1:50 pm | News | Comments

Researchers who use x-rays to take snapshots of proteins need a billion copies of the same protein stacked and packed into a neat crystal. Now, scientists using exceptionally bright and fast x-rays supplied by free-electron lasers can take a picture that rivals conventional methods with a sheet of proteins just one protein molecule thick. This broadens the number and type of proteins that can be studied.

Researchers develop first single-molecule LED

February 13, 2014 9:42 am | News | Comments

A team in France has greatly miniaturized the light-emitting diode (LED) by creating one from a single polythiophene wire placed between the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and a gold surface. This nanowire, which is made of the same hydrogen, carbon and sulfur components found in much larger LEDs, emits light only when the current passes in a certain direction.

Satellite video shows movement of major U.S. winter storm

February 12, 2014 5:28 pm | by Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

A new NASA video shows three days of movement, beginning Feb. 10, of a massive winter storm that stretches from the southern U.S. to the northeast. Compiled using NOAA's GOES satellite imagery, the sequence shows snow cover and cloud movements over a true-color image of land and ocean created by data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard NASA’s Aqua and Terra satellites.

Nokia touts video recording in new Lumia phone

February 12, 2014 5:10 pm | by Anick Jesdanun - AP Technology Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Nokia is selling a new Windows phone that promises enhanced video-recording capabilities. The new Lumia Icon sports four microphones, compared with the one or two typically found in smartphones. The two on the front are activated when making phone calls, while the two on the rear are used when taking video.

Stirring-up atomtronics in a quantum circuit

February 12, 2014 5:02 pm | by E. Edwards, JQI | News | Comments

Modern electronics relies on utilizing the charge properties of the electron. The emerging field of atomtronics, however, uses ensembles of atoms to build analogs to electronic circuit elements. Physicists have built a superfluid atomtronic circuit that have allowed them to demonstrate a tool that is critical to electronics: hysteresis. It is the first time that hysteresis has been observed in an ultracold atomic gas.

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