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Computer scientists speed up mine detection

May 5, 2015 8:22 am | by Ioana Patringenaru, Univ. of California, San Diego | News | Comments

Computer scientists at the Univ. of California, San Diego, have combined sophisticated computer vision algorithms and a brain-computer interface to find mines in sonar images of the ocean floor. The study shows that the new method speeds detection up considerably, when compared to existing methods, which mainly consist of visual inspection by a mine detection expert.

Channeling valleytronics in graphene

May 5, 2015 8:05 am | by Lynn Yarris, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

To the list of potential applications of graphene we can now add valleytronics, the coding of data in the wave-like motion of electrons as they speed through a conductor. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers have discovered topologically protected 1-D electron conducting channels at the domain walls of bilayer graphene. These conducting channels are “valley polarized".

Engineering students create real-time 3-D radar system

May 5, 2015 7:44 am | by Jade Boyd, Rice Univ. | Videos | Comments

Spencer Kent stands nervously in front of Team D.R.A.D.I.S.’ booth at Rice Univ.’s annual Engineering Design Showcase. Judging begins in about 10 min, and his teammate Galen Schmidt is frantically typing computer code into a laptop beside the team’s custom-made radar system.

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The random Raman laser: A new light source for microcosmos

May 4, 2015 10:42 am | by The Optical Society | News | Comments

In modern microscope imaging techniques, lasers are used as light sources because they can deliver fast pulsed and extremely high-intensity radiation to a target, allowing for rapid image acquisition. However, traditional lasers come with a significant disadvantage in that they produce images with blurred speckle patterns: a visual artifact that arises because of a property of traditional lasers called "high spatial coherence."

Researchers probe chemistry, topography and mechanics with one instrument

May 4, 2015 7:39 am | by Dawn Levy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

The probe of an atomic force microscope (AFM) scans a surface to reveal details at a resolution 1,000 times greater than that of an optical microscope. That makes AFM the premier tool for analyzing physical features, but it cannot tell scientists anything about chemistry. For that they turn to the mass spectrometer.

Cellular sensing platform supports next-gen bioscience, biotech applications

May 1, 2015 8:25 am | by John Toon, Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a novel cellular sensing platform that promises to expand the use of semiconductor technology in the development of next-generation bioscience and biotech applications. The research proposes and demonstrates the world’s first multi-modality cellular sensor arranged in a standard low-cost CMOS process.

Making robots more human

May 1, 2015 8:18 am | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

Most people are naturally adept at reading facial expressions to tell what others are feeling. Now scientists have developed ultra-sensitive, wearable sensors that can do the same thing. Their technology, reported in the ACS Nano, could help robot developers make their machines more human.

“Fingerprinting” chips to fight counterfeiting

May 1, 2015 7:37 am | by Rob Matheson, MIT News Office | News | Comments

It’s often said that no two human fingerprints are exactly alike. For that reason, police often use them as evidence to link suspects to crime scenes. The same goes for silicon chips: Manufacturing processes cause microscopic variations in chips that are unpredictable, permanent, and effectively impossible to clone.

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Chemists cook up three-atom-thick electronic sheets

April 30, 2015 8:41 am | by Anne Ju, Cornell Univ. | News | Comments

Making thin films out of semiconducting materials is analogous to how ice grows on a windowpane: When the conditions are just right, the semiconductor grows in flat crystals that slowly fuse together, eventually forming a continuous film. This process of film deposition is common for traditional semiconductors like silicon or gallium arsenide, but Cornell Univ. scientists are pushing the limits for how thin they can go.

The trillion-frame-per-second camera

April 30, 2015 8:09 am | by Rebecca B. Andersen, The Optical Society | News | Comments

When a crystal lattice is excited by a laser pulse, waves of jostling atoms can travel through the material at close to one sixth the speed of light, or approximately 28,000 mps. Scientists now have a new tool to take movies of such superfast movement in a single shot. Researchers from Japan have developed a new high-speed camera that can record events at a rate of more than one-trillion-frames-per-second.

Robotically discovering Earth's nearest neighbors

April 29, 2015 11:34 am | by University of Hawaii at Manoa | News | Comments

A team of astronomers using ground-based telescopes in Hawaii, California, and Arizona recently discovered a planetary system orbiting a nearby star that is only 54 light-years away. All three planets orbit their star at a distance closer than Mercury orbits the sun, completing their orbits in just 5, 15, and 24 days.

Enron becomes unlikely data source for computer science researchers

April 29, 2015 11:23 am | by NC State University | News | Comments

Computer science researchers have turned to unlikely sources - including Enron - for assembling huge collections of spreadsheets that can be used to study how people use this software. The goal is for the data to facilitate research to make spreadsheets more useful.

Controversial Telescope's Website Hacked

April 27, 2015 10:19 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

An apparent cyberattack Sunday temporarily disrupted the main website of Thirty Meter Telescope, the organization trying to construct one of the world's largest telescopes near the summit of Mauna Kea on Hawaii's Big Island.

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Power Outages Limit Tech’s Ability to Help People Connect After Quake

April 27, 2015 10:06 am | by Associated Press, Foster Klug | News | Comments

Power outages and communications problems have made life agonizing for the nearly 6 million Nepalese who live abroad— or about 22 percent of the population. They try desperately to reach loved ones through cellphones and global messaging apps, only to be met with silence or fleeting connections. The impoverished country’s communications have been shaken back to a different era.

Why Drafting Standards Play a Vital Role in Engineering Communication?

April 24, 2015 9:10 am | by Gaurang Trivedi, Engineering Consultant, TrueCADD | Articles | Comments

Engineering drawings remain at a core for any manufacturing organization as they communicate ideas that are expected to be transformed into a profitable product. Most companies begin developing engineering drawings using international drafting standards. However, with the course of time, and as the idea begins to shape up, there’s always a deviation from the standards followed.

Researchers use novel polarization to increase data speeds

April 24, 2015 7:53 am | by Jay Mwamba, The City College of New York | News | Comments

As the world’s exponentially growing demand for digital data slows the Internet and cell phone communication, City College of New York researchers may have just figured out a new way to increase its speed.

Breaking Down Barriers: Streamlining Data Management to Boost Knowledge Sharing

April 23, 2015 3:10 pm | by Ian Peirson, Senior Solutions Consultant, IDBS | Articles | Comments

Research in the pharmaceutical and industrial science industries has become increasingly global, multidisciplinary and data-intensive. This is made clear by the evolution in patent approvals, which can also be considered a reliable measure of innovation in these industries. Innovation itself is a cumulative effect, which requires access to multiple fragments of knowledge from disparate sources and exchange of technology and ideas.

Gamers feel the glove

April 23, 2015 7:51 am | by Mike Williams, Rice Univ. | Videos | Comments

Rice Univ. engineering students are working to make virtual reality a little more real with their invention of a glove that allows a user to feel what they’re touching while gaming. The Hands Omni glove developed at Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen will provide a way for gamers and others to feel the environments they inhabit through the likes of 3-D heads-ups displays.

Google wireless phone service challenges major carriers

April 22, 2015 6:03 pm | by Michael Liedtke, AP Technology Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

Google is trying to shake up the wireless phone industry with a low-priced service designed to pressure major carriers into making it more affordable for people to get online and use Google's services. The service, called "Project Fi," debuted Wednesday, about two months after Google revealed its plans to expand its ever-growing empire into providing wireless connections for smartphones.

Putting a new spin on computing memory

April 22, 2015 11:23 am | by Britt Faulstick, Drexel Univ. | News | Comments

Ever since computers have been small enough to be fixtures on desks and laps, their central processing has functioned something like an atomic Etch A Sketch, with electromagnetic fields pushing data bits into place to encode data. Unfortunately, the same drawbacks and perils of the mechanical sketch board have been just as pervasive in computing.

Testing brain activity to identify cybersecurity threats

April 22, 2015 10:37 am | by Angie Hunt, Iowa State Univ. | News | Comments

The old adage that a chain is only as strong as its weakest link certainly applies to the risk organizations face in defending against cybersecurity threats. Employees pose a danger that can be just as damaging as a hacker. Iowa State Univ. researchers are working to better understand these internal threats by getting inside the minds of employees who put their company at risk.

Researchers inform development of Ebola vaccine trials

April 21, 2015 11:58 am | by Faith Singer-Villalobos, Univ. of Texas at Austin | News | Comments

As the current Ebola outbreak wanes, scientists have to make the most of every opportunity to prepare for future outbreaks. One such opportunity involves the identification of a safe and effective Ebola vaccine. Texas supercomputers have aided researchers in modeling which types of clinical trials will provide the best information.

Innovation boosts Wi-Fi bandwidth ten-fold

April 21, 2015 8:39 am | by Rachel Robertson, Oregon State Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers at Oregon State Univ. have invented a new technology that can increase the bandwidth of Wi-Fi systems by 10 times, using LED lights to transmit information. The technology could be integrated with existing Wi-Fi systems to reduce bandwidth problems in crowded locations, such as airport terminals or coffee shops, and in homes where several people have multiple Wi-Fi devices.

Better battery imaging paves way for renewable energy future

April 21, 2015 8:04 am | by Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

In a move that could improve the energy storage of everything from portable electronics to electric microgrids, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison and Brookhaven National Laboratory researchers have developed a novel x-ray imaging technique to visualize and study the electrochemical reactions in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries containing a new type of material, iron fluoride.

Electronic device performance enhanced with new transistor encasing method

April 21, 2015 7:50 am | by Austin Keating, News Bureau Intern, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign | News | Comments

A more effective method for closing gaps in atomically small wires has been developed by Univ. of Illinois researchers, further opening the doors to a new transistor technology. Silicon-based transistors have been the foundation of modern electronics for more than half a century. A new transistor technology, carbon nanotube wires, shows promise in replacing silicon because it can operate ten times as fast and is more flexible.

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