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Schematic of the device The idea was to take a Cooper pair—a pair of electrons that allows electricity to flow freely in superconductors—and get them, while tunneling—a quantum phenomenon—across a junction between two superconductor leads, to pass through

Quantum teleportation? Producing spin-entangled electrons

July 2, 2015 11:11 am | by RIKEN | News | Comments

Researchers have successfully produced pairs of spin-entangled electrons and demonstrated that they remain entangled even when they are separated from one another on a chip. This research could contribute to creation of futuristic quantum networks operating using quantum teleportation, which could allow information contained in qubits to be shared between many elements on chip, a key requirement to scale up quantum computer power.

Controlling liquids at micro and nano scales

July 2, 2015 10:47 am | by Northumbria University | News | Comments

From targeted drug delivery to the self-assembly of nano robots, new research is using super-...

World first: Carbon capture and storage safety investigated

July 2, 2015 10:39 am | by National Oceanography Centre | News | Comments

A significant step has been made for potential Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) deployment, with...

Engineering the world’s smallest nanocrystal

July 2, 2015 10:24 am | by RIKEN | News | Comments

In the natural world, proteins use the process of biomineralization to incorporate metallic...

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Magnetic skyrmions

Evidence for stable room-temperature skyrmions found

July 2, 2015 10:17 am | by RIKEN | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a class of materials that displays clear evidence for stable skyrmions at room temperature and above, paving the way for the development of useful spintronics devices. Magnetic skyrmions are tiny, nanometer-sized magnetic-spin vortices that emerge in magnetic materials. Because they are so small, they could potentially be used as extremely dense memory devices.

Study: Targeted LEDs could provide efficient lighting for plants grown in space

July 2, 2015 8:54 am | by Purdue University | News | Comments

A Purdue University study shows that targeting plants with red and blue LEDs provides energy-efficient lighting in contained environments, a finding that could advance the development of crop-growth modules for space exploration.

Improving insulation materials, down to wetting crossed fibres

July 2, 2015 8:52 am | by Springer | News | Comments

Sandcastles are a prime example of how adding a small amount of liquid to a granular material changes its characteristics. But understanding the effect of a liquid wetting randomly oriented fibers in a fibrous medium remains a mystery. Now, scientists have demonstrated that the spreading of the liquid is controlled by three key parameters: the amount of liquid on the fibers, the fibres’ orientation and the minimum distance between them. 

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Implantable 'artificial pancreas' could help diabetes patients control their blood sugar

July 2, 2015 8:48 am | by ACS | News | Comments

Scientists are reporting the development of an implantable "artificial pancreas" that continuously measures a person's blood sugar, or glucose, level and can automatically release insulin as needed.

Ultra-stable JILA microscopy technique tracks tiny objects for hours

July 2, 2015 8:44 am | by NIST | News | Comments

​JILA researchers have designed a microscope instrument so stable that it can accurately measure the 3D movement of individual molecules over many hours--hundreds of times longer than the current limit measured in seconds.

Team develops new storage cell for solar energy storage, nighttime conversion

July 2, 2015 8:41 am | by UT Arlington | News | Comments

A University of Texas at Arlington materials science and engineering team has developed a new energy cell that can store large-scale solar energy even when it's dark. The innovation is an advancement over the most common solar energy systems that rely on using sunlight immediately as a power source. 

We're not alone, but the universe may be less crowded than we think

July 2, 2015 8:38 am | by Michigan State University | News | Comments

Over the years, the Hubble Space Telescope has allowed astronomers to look deep into the universe. There may be far fewer galaxies further out in the universe then might be expected, according to a new study led by Michigan State University.

Technologists John Kelton and Daniel Ray perform inspection of the Falling Particle Receiver during a cloud delay atop the National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. Courtesy of Randy Montoya

Testing heats up at Sandia’s Solar Tower with high temperature falling particle receiver

July 1, 2015 1:56 pm | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories are working to lower the cost of solar energy systems and improve efficiencies in a big way, thanks to a system of small particles. This month, engineers lifted Sandia’s continuously recirculating falling particle receiver to the top of the tower at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility, marking the start of first-of-its-kind testing that will continue through 2015.

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Muon tomography images of a valve allowed researchers to differentiate between an open and closed valve. Courtesy of Matt Durham, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Using muons from cosmic rays to find fraying infrastructure

July 1, 2015 12:58 pm | by Laurel Hamers, American Institute of Physics | News | Comments

In the United States, electricity comes with the flip of a switch and heat arrives with the push of a button. Behind such convenience lies a massive infrastructure network that produces and distributes energy. And just like roads wear down and need to be repaved occasionally, this energy infrastructure degrades over time. Pipes can corrode and concrete can wear thin. Failure can be catastrophic...

Smaller is more stable. Smaller Mg nanoparticles display better mechanical performance that is good for structural stability during cycling and also hydrogen storage kinetics. Courtesy of Qian Yu/Zhejiang University

Physical study may give boost to hydrogen cars

July 1, 2015 12:21 pm | by Jason Bardi, American Institute of Physics | News | Comments

A team of researchers describes the physics of magnesium hydride, one type of material that potentially could be used to store hydrogen fuel in future automobiles and other applications. Using a technique known as in situ transmission electron microscopy, the team tested different sized nanoparticles of magnesium hydride to gauge their mechanical properties and discovered how one might engineer the nanoparticles to make them better.

This is a branch of Dracaena marginata. Courtesy of Linnea Hesse

The inside story: MRI imaging shows how plants can inspire new engineering materials

July 1, 2015 10:39 am | by Society for Experimental Biology | News | Comments

3-D imaging of plant branching structures is allowing researchers to see how exactly their internal tissues respond under stress, giving new insights into the design of potential new engineering materials, such as those used in aircraft. Researchers have developed a new method to visualize the junction between branches and stems. The method uses MRI to study how vascular tissue within the ramifications deforms under stress and strain.

A fresh CNF based microwave silicon transistor chip. After 3 weeks of putting it in a woodpile, the chip was partially degraded with the help of fungi. Courtesy of Jung-Hun Seo, Shaoqin Gong and Zhenqiang Ma/University of Wisconsin-Madison

Biodegradable, flexible silicon transistors developed

July 1, 2015 10:26 am | by Zhengzheng Zhang, American Institute of Physics | News | Comments

Researchers have come up with a new solution to alleviate the environmental burden of discarded electronics. They have demonstrated the feasibility of making microwave biodegradable thin-film transistors from a transparent, flexible biodegradable substrate made from inexpensive wood, called cellulose nanofibrillated fiber (CNF). This work opens the door for green, low-cost, portable electronic devices in future.

Subterranean objects influence the tick rate of local clocks that are located above the Earth’s surface. New lava filling a magma chamber beneath a volcano makes a clock located above that volcano tick more slowly than a clock that is located further away

Monitoring volcanoes with ground-based atomic clocks

July 1, 2015 10:07 am | by University of Zurich | News | Comments

An international team led by scientists from the University of Zurich finds that high-precision atomic clocks can be used to monitor volcanoes and potentially improve predictions of future eruptions. In addition, a ground-based network of atomic clocks could monitor the reaction of the Earth’s crust to solid Earth tides.

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New method can make cheaper solar energy storage

July 1, 2015 7:46 am | by EPFL | News | Comments

Storing solar energy as hydrogen is a promising way for developing comprehensive renewable energy systems. EPFL scientists have now developed a simple, unconventional method to fabricate high-quality, efficient solar panels for direct solar hydrogen production with low cost.

Scientists propose new model of mysterious barrier to fusion known as the 'density limit'

July 1, 2015 7:00 am | by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have developed a detailed model of the source of a puzzling limitation on fusion reactions. The findings complete and confirm previous PPPL research and could lead to steps to overcome the barrier if the model proves consistent with experimental data. 

NASA missions monitor a waking black hole

July 1, 2015 7:00 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA's Swift satellite detected a rising tide of high-energy X-rays from the constellation Cygnus on June 15, just before 2:32 p.m. EDT. The outburst came from V404 Cygni, a binary system located about 8,000 light-years away that contains a black hole. Every couple of decades the black hole fires up in an outburst of high-energy light, becoming an X-ray nova. Until the Swift detection, it had been slumbering since 1989.

New model of cosmic stickiness favors 'Big Rip' demise of universe

July 1, 2015 7:00 am | by Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

The universe can be a very sticky place, but just how sticky is a matter of debate. That is because for decades cosmologists have had trouble reconciling the classic notion of viscosity based on the laws of thermodynamics with Einstein's general theory of relativity. However, a team from Vanderbilt University has come up with a fundamentally new mathematical formulation of the problem that appears to bridge this long-standing gap.

Does radiation from X-rays and CT scans really cause cancer?

July 1, 2015 12:00 am | by Loyola University Health System | News | Comments

In recent years, there has been widespread media coverage of studies purporting to show that radiation from X-rays, CT scans and other medical imaging causes cancer. But such studies have serious flaws, including their reliance on an unproven statistical model.

Growing cell membranes are seen in this time lapse sequence (numbers correspond to minutes of duration). Courtesy of Michael Hardy, UC San Diego

Scientists create synthetic membranes that grow like living cells

June 30, 2015 11:34 am | by UC San Diego | News | Comments

Chemists and biologists have succeeded in designing and synthesizing an artificial cell membrane capable of sustaining continual growth, just like a living cell. Their achievement will allow scientists to more accurately replicate the behavior of living cell membranes, which until now have been modeled only by synthetic cell membranes without the ability to add new phospholipids.

Congenital heart experts from Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital have successfully integrated two common imaging techniques to produce a three-dimensional anatomic model of a patient’s heart. The 3-D model printing of patients’ hearts has bec

First 3-D heart printed using multiple imaging techniques

June 30, 2015 11:18 am | by Spectrum Health | News | Comments

Congenital heart experts have successfully integrated two common imaging techniques to produce a three-dimensional anatomic model of a patient’s heart. This is the first time the integration of computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (3DTEE) has successfully been used for printing a hybrid 3-D model of a patient’s heart.

 A new technique pioneered at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory reveals atomic-scale changes during catalytic reactions in real time and under real operating conditions. A team of scientists used a newly developed reaction cha

X-Rays and electrons join forces to map catalytic reactions in real-time

June 30, 2015 11:03 am | by Brookhaven National Laboratory | News | Comments

A new technique reveals atomic-scale changes during catalytic reactions in real time and under real operating conditions. Scientists used a newly developed reaction chamber to combine x-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron microscopy for an unprecedented portrait of a common chemical reaction. The results demonstrate a powerful operando technique that may revolutionize research on catalysts, batteries, fuel cells...

By focusing lasers onto silicon buried under a clear layer of silicon dioxide, the group has perfected a way to reliably blast tiny cavities in the solid silicon. This creates extremely high pressure around the explosion site and forms the new phases.

Making new materials with micro-explosions

June 30, 2015 10:49 am | by Australian National University | News | Comments

Scientists have made exotic new materials by creating laser-induced micro-explosions in silicon, the common computer chip material. The new technique could lead to the simple creation and manufacture of superconductors or high-efficiency solar cells and light sensors. By focusing lasers onto silicon buried under a clear layer of silicon dioxide, the group has perfected a way to reliably blast tiny cavities in the solid silicon.

Computer simulations are layered over a picture of a time trial rider. Riders can save around six seconds if the team car maintains a gap of five meters, instead of the 10 meters laid down by the regulations. Courtesy of Eindhoven University of Technology

Aerodynamic effects can save tens of seconds in cycling time trials

June 30, 2015 10:35 am | by Eindhoven University of Technology | News | Comments

Will next Saturday’s Tour de France prologue get the winner it deserves? New aerodynamic research shows that riders in a time trial can save vital seconds by riding closer to the following team car. Over a short distance like the prologue of the Tour de France, that can save as much as six seconds: enough to make the difference between winning and losing. On longer events like world championships, the effect can add up to tens of seconds.

Rice University has installed microscopes that will allow researchers to peer deeper than ever into the fabric of the universe. The Titan Themis scanning/transmission electron microscope, one of the most powerful in the United States, will enable scientis

New electron microscopes will capture images at subnanometer resolution

June 30, 2015 10:15 am | by Rice University | News | Comments

Rice University has installed microscopes that will allow researchers to peer deeper than ever into the fabric of the universe. The Titan Themis scanning/transmission electron microscope, one of the most powerful in the United States, will enable scientists from Rice as well as academic and industrial partners to view and analyze materials smaller than a nanometer — a billionth of a meter — with startling clarity.

New method of quantum entanglement vastly increases how much information can be carried in a photon

June 30, 2015 8:51 am | by UCLA | News | Comments

A team of researchers led by UCLA electrical engineers has demonstrated a new way to harness light particles, or photons, that are connected to each other and act in unison no matter how far apart they are  — a phenomenon known as quantum entanglement.

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