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Samsung: Patents developed by Google engineers

April 2, 2014 6:24 am | by Martha Mendoza, AP National Writer | News | Comments

Samsung fired back at Apple's accusations of patent theft Tuesday, saying the South Korean tech giant didn't write any of the Android software on its smartphones and tablets, Google did. The finger-pointing took place in U.S. District Court in San Jose, where Apple Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co. are accusing each other of stealing ideas from each other. At stake: more than $2 billion if Samsung loses, about $6 million if Apple loses.

Toilet tech fair tackles global sanitation woes

March 24, 2014 9:10 am | by Katy Daigle, AP Environment Writer | News | Comments

Scientists who accepted the Bill & Melinda...

Study: Industry-sponsored academic inventions spur increased innovation

March 20, 2014 7:57 am | by Bobbie Mixon, NSF | News | Comments

Industry-sponsored academic research leads to innovative patents and licenses, says a new...

Obama unleashing power of data on climate change

March 19, 2014 8:47 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The White House on Wednesday announced an...

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California pushes to finish driverless car rules

March 12, 2014 1:44 pm | by Justin Pritchard, Associated Press | News | Comments

Once the stuff of science fiction, driverless cars could be commercially available by decade's end. Under a California law passed in 2012, the DMV must decide by the end of this year how to integrate the autonomous vehicles onto public roads. That means the regulation's writers will post draft language regulations around June, then alter the rules in response to public comment by fall in order to get them finalized by the end of 2014.

Inventor of Web calls for digital bill of rights

March 12, 2014 8:50 am | Videos | Comments

The World Wide Web marks its 25th anniversary this year. On Wednesday, its inventor, Tim Berners-Lee, commented about the state of the Internet and about the need to defend principles that have made the Web successful. Named an R&D Scientist of the Year in 1996, Berners-Lee has been a long-time proponent of openness and neutrality on the Web.

South By Southwest: Secrets, spying, chef Watson

March 11, 2014 11:49 am | by Barbara Ortutay, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

FOMO—or the fear of missing out—is a common complaint at the South By Southwest Interactive festival in Austin, Texas each year. It's here, after all, that "Girls" creator Lena Dunham spoke on Monday at the same time that NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden gave a teleconferenced talk. All the while, IBM showed off the capabilities of cognitive computing in a language anyone could understand: food.

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U.S. network to scan workers with secret clearances

March 10, 2014 9:49 am | by Stephen Braun, Associated Press | News | Comments

Intelligence officials are planning a sweeping system of electronic monitoring that would tap into government, financial and other databases to scan the behavior of many of the 5 million federal employees with secret clearances. The system is intended to identify rogue agents, corrupt officials and leakers, in part to prevent cases similar to former National Security Agency analyst Edward Snowden.

Nuclear dump leak raises questions about cleanup

February 28, 2014 2:56 pm | by Jeri Clausing, Associated Press | News | Comments

For 15 years trucks have been hauling decades worth of plutonium-contaminated waste to what is supposed to be a safe and final resting place a half mile underground in the salt beds of the Permian Basin in New Mexico. But back-to-back accidents and an above-ground radiation release shuttered the government's only deep underground nuclear waste dump and raised questions about the $5-billion-a-year program for cleaning up legacy waste.

Report: Federal support enabled 22 major technology advances

February 19, 2014 9:52 am | by Information Technology and Innovation Foundation | News | Comments

A new report examines 22 cases of successful U.S. innovation in which the development of key foundational technologies stemmed at least in part from federal investment in research and development (R&D). The cases cover technologies developed across a wide range of fields over the past half century, from information and communications technology, energy and health care to transportation, agriculture and mathematics.

Report: Offshoring, outsourcing a mixed bag for American jobs, wages

February 19, 2014 9:41 am | by Kathleen Maclay, Media Relations, Univ. of California, Berkeley | News | Comments

A new study by Univ. of California, Berkeley and Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers finds that the practices of outsourcing and offshoring jobs appear to have both positive and negative effects on American jobs and wages. The pilot study provides the first representative and internationally comparable evidence of the domestic and international sourcing practices of U.S. private and public sector organizations.

Report compiles quantitative information on S&E

February 12, 2014 12:00 pm | by National Science Foundation | News | Comments

Science and Engineering Indicators (SEI) is first and foremost a volume of record comprising the major high-quality quantitative data on the U.S. and international science and engineering enterprise. SEI is factual and policy neutral. It doesn’t offer policy options, and it doesn’t make policy recommendations.

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Study suggests ways to improve common furniture fire test

February 11, 2014 8:19 am | News | Comments

NIST and American Univ. researchers report in a new study that the bench-scale test widely used to evaluate whether a burning cigarette will ignite upholstered furniture may underestimate the tendency of component materials to smolder when these materials are used in sofas and chairs supported by springs or cloth. The study comes as regulations and methods for evaluating ignition in furniture are undergoing scrutiny.

Car-to-car talk offers warning on collisions

February 4, 2014 1:33 pm | by Joan Lowy, Associated Press | News | Comments

Your car might see a deadly crash coming even if you don't, the government says, indicating it will require automakers to equip new vehicles with technology that lets cars warn each other if they're plunging toward peril. The action, still some years off, has "game-changing potential" to cut collisions, deaths and injuries, federal transportation officials said at a news conference Monday.

What your company can learn from NASA's tragedies

January 31, 2014 8:59 am | News | Comments

Since the 2003 Columbia shuttle disaster, business professor Peter Madsen at Brigham Young Univ. has examined how NASA recognizes “near-misses”, where narrowly averted failures result in successful outcomes. A new study of NASA’s safety climate finds that recognition of those near-misses goes up when the significance of a project is emphasized, and when organizational leaders emphasize safety relative to other goals, such as efficiency.

Modeling buildings by the millions: Building codes in China tested for energy savings

January 31, 2014 8:50 am | News | Comments

According to a study by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, China can build its way to a more energy efficient future by improving the rules regulating these structures like houses, apartments and retail stores. The scientists created a unique model that projects how much energy can be saved with changes to China's building energy codes, and those savings were significant.

Study: Active power control of wind turbines can improve power grid reliability

January 28, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

Wind energy experts have completed a comprehensive study to understand how wind power technology can assist the power grid by controlling the active power output being placed onto the system. They find that wind power can do this by adjusting its power output to enhance system reliability, using forms of active power control such as synthetic inertial control, primary frequency control and automatic generation control regulation.

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Samsung, Google sign patent agreement

January 27, 2014 9:50 am | by Youkyung Lee, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Samsung Electronics Co. has signed an agreement with Google Inc. to cross-license their patents, reducing the risk of costly legal disputes over intellectual property and likely fostering greater collaborate between the two tech giants. Seoul-based Samsung said Monday that the deal covers patents to be filed over the next 10 years as well as existing patents.

Senate passes spending bill with increases for NASA, DOE

January 17, 2014 9:07 am | by Andrew Taylor, Associated Press | News | Comments

Congress sent President Barack Obama a $1.1 trillion government-wide spending bill Thursday, The huge bill funds every agency of government, pairing increases for NASA, the Dept. of Energy and the National Institutes of Health with cuts to the Internal Revenue Service and foreign aid. Among the things, the budget increase at NASA will allow the International Space Station to operate to at least 2024.

Study: Copycats pave the way to problem-solving success

January 15, 2014 9:07 am | News | Comments

It is often better to be surrounded by copycats than innovators, according to a new Indiana Univ. study that created a virtual problem landscape to explore the advantages and disadvantages of “social learning”. The researchers thought at first it would be better to have innovators around, but in their experiments imitators offered the greater benefit.

Report: NSA maps pathway into computers

January 15, 2014 8:44 am | News | Comments

According to a report from The New York Times, the National Security Agency has implanted software in nearly 100,000 computers around the world that allows the U.S. to conduct surveillance on those machines. The technology, which is not used in the U.S., relies on radio waves that can be transmitted from tiny circuit boards and USB cards inserted covertly into the computers.  

Self-driving vehicles offer potential benefits, challenges for lawmakers

January 6, 2014 8:38 am | News | Comments

New research finds that the social benefits of autonomous vehicles will outweigh the likely disadvantages. Decreased crashes, increased mobility, and increases in fuel economy will drive the technology forward, says RAND Corp. researchers, despite privacy concerns and need for updates in insurance regulations.

NSF study details recent R&D growth

January 6, 2014 8:20 am | News | Comments

New data collected by the National Science Foundation have resulted in an upward revision in the previously published 2011 U.S. R&D performance total, and further expansion of U.S. R&D performance is indicated for 2012. These new data put U.S. R&D expenditures at $428.2 billion in 2011, an increase of $20.5 billion over 2010. The preliminary estimate of the 2012 U.S. total for R&D is $452.6 billion.

Report: NSA intercepts computer deliveries

December 30, 2013 9:37 am | by Raphael Satter, Associated Press | News | Comments

A German magazine lifted the lid on the operations of the National Security Agency's hacking unit Sunday, reporting that American spies intercept computer deliveries, exploit hardware vulnerabilities, and even hijack Microsoft's internal reporting system to spy on their targets.

To clean up coal, Obama pushes more oil production

December 23, 2013 10:31 am | by Dina Cappiello, Associated Press | News | Comments

America's newest, most expensive coal-fired power plant is hailed as one of the cleanest on the planet, thanks to government-backed technology that removes carbon dioxide and keeps it out of the atmosphere. But once the carbon is stripped away, it will be used to do something that is not so green at all. It will extract oil.

A Strategic Balance

December 10, 2013 4:45 pm | by Paul Livingstone | Thermo Fisher Scientific | Articles | Comments

As part of its R&D 100 Awards program, the editors of R&D Magazine hold an annual roundtable discussion that addresses outstanding trends and issues in research and development. This year, the Industry Executives’ Roundtable, held Nov. 7, 2013, in Orlando, Fla., focused on industrial research, featuring executives from several organizations that invest heavily in R&D efforts. These organizations all won 2013 R&D 100 Awards.

Tech firms vie to protect personal data, profits

December 10, 2013 8:39 am | by Marcy Gordon and Michael Liedtke, AP Business Writers | News | Comments

Even as Silicon Valley speaks out against the U.S. government's surveillance methods, technology companies are turning a handsome profit by mining personal data. Tarnished by revelations that the National Security Agency trolls deep into the everyday lives of Web surfers, companies like Apple, Facebook, Google, and Microsoft are aggressively battling any perception that they voluntarily give the government access to users' information.

China claims victory in scrubbing Internet clean

December 2, 2013 1:39 pm | by Didi Tang, Associated Press | News | Comments

The Chinese government has declared victory in cleaning up what it considers rumors, negativity and unruliness from online discourse, while critics say the moves have suppressed criticism of the government and ruling Communist Party. Beijing launched the campaign this summer, arresting dozens of people for spreading rumors and creating new penalties for people who post libelous information.

Study: Research funding has become prone to bubble formation

November 22, 2013 11:12 am | News | Comments

According to a recent study, fashions in research funding, reward structures in universities and streamlining of scientific agendas undermine traditional academic norms and may result in science bubbles. New research shows how the mechanisms that set off the financial crisis might be replicating in the field of science.

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