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Researchers address economic dangers of “peak oil”

October 16, 2013 3:08 pm | News | Comments

Experts from the Univ. of Maryland and a leading university in Spain demonstrate in a new study which sectors could put the entire U.S. economy at risk when global oil production peaks. This multi-disciplinary team recommends immediate action by government, private and commercial sectors to reduce the vulnerability of these sectors.

Study: Methane leaks from gas drilling not huge

September 17, 2013 1:02 pm | by Kevin Begos and Seth Borenstein, Associated Press | News | Comments

According to research published this week drilling and fracking for natural gas don't seem to spew immense amounts of the greenhouse gas methane into the air, as has been feared. The study, mostly funded by energy interests,  doesn't address other fracking concerns about potential air and water pollution, but does generally with government estimates.

Data: a resource more valuable than gold?

September 13, 2013 11:54 am | News | Comments

From Sept. 16 to 18, 2013, top leaders from the White House and U.S. science agencies and their international colleagues will gather for three days in Washington, D.C., for a major meeting of the Research Data Alliance (RDA). More than 850 researchers and data experts belong to the RDA, which focuses on the development and adoption of common tools, harmonized standards and infrastructure needed for data sharing by researchers.

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Hydroelectric power makes big comeback at U.S. dams

September 12, 2013 9:20 am | by David Pitt, Associated Press | News | Comments

In the 1980s and 1990s, hydroelectric development stagnated as environmental groups lobbied against it and a long regulatory process required years of environmental study. But for the first time in decades, power companies are proposing new projects to take advantage of government financial incentives, policies that promote renewable energy over fossil fuels and efforts to streamline the permit process.

New agreement strengthens U.S., U.K. research collaboration

September 6, 2013 10:23 am | News | Comments

The U.S. National Science Foundation and U.K. Research Councils have entered into a new agreement designed to help support international research partnerships between the two nations. This new, two-way, lead-agency agreement enables a simplified and flexible process for researchers wishing to apply for U.S.-U.K. collaborative research funding, using the same systems and processes within the respective funding agencies.

Sharing the risks and costs of biomass crops

September 4, 2013 4:09 pm | News | Comments

Farmers who grow corn and soybeans can take advantage of government price support programs and crop insurance, but similar programs are not available for those who grow biomass crops. A new study recommends a framework for contracts between growers and biorefineries to help spell out expectations and designate who will assume the risks and costs.

Study suggests robotic surgery complications are underreported

September 4, 2013 7:44 am | News | Comments

Despite widespread adoption by hospitals of surgical robot technology over the past decade, a “slapdash” system of reporting complications paints an unclear picture of its safety, according to Johns Hopkins researchers. When an adverse event or device malfunction occurs, hospitals are required to report these incidents. But this doesn’t always happen, the researchers say.

Time for tech transfer law to change?

August 29, 2013 2:56 pm | News | Comments

The law that has helped medical discoveries make the leap from university labs to the marketplace for more than 30 years needs revising, according to Univ. of Michigan doctor has taken another look at the history of Bayh-Dole. He says that the Supreme Court ruling on gene patenting, and modern risks raised by industry/academic interaction, signal a need for change.

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California vies for new space industry

August 28, 2013 7:52 am | by Mihir Zaveri, Associated Press | News | Comments

As several new private ventures to take people on trips to space come closer to becoming reality, California lawmakers are racing other states to woo the new space companies with cushy incentives. They are debating a bill now in Sacramento that would insulate manufacturers of spaceships and parts suppliers from liability should travelers get injured or killed on a voyage, except in cases such as gross negligence or intentional wrongdoing.

NIST makes new recommendations for system patches, malware avoidance

August 22, 2013 8:43 am | News | Comments

Vulnerabilities in software and firmware are the easiest ways to attack a system, and two revised publications from NIST approach the problem by providing new guidance for software patching and warding off malware. The new computer security guides to help computer system managers protect their systems.

U.K. bars trash cans from tracking people with Wi-Fi

August 14, 2013 11:38 am | by Raphael Satter, Associated Press | News | Comments

Officials demanded Monday that an advertising firm stop using a network of high-tech trash cans to track people walking through London's financial district. The Renew ad firm has been using technology embedded in the hulking receptacles to measure the Wi-Fi signals emitted by smartphones, and suggested that it would apply the concept of "cookies"—tracking files that follow Internet users across the Web—to the physical world.

Faster, more powerful mobile devices

August 12, 2013 8:12 am | News | Comments

The next generation of smartphones could be capable of storing 250 hours of high-definition video and carrying a charge for a week, thanks to an advanced data storage technology from a Univ. of Michigan startup that could upend the memory market. Crossbar Inc., which licensed the technology from U-M in 2010, recently announced it has developed a working resistive random access memory prototype in a commercial fabrication facility.

SRI, NEDO collaborate to accelerate innovation

August 6, 2013 11:01 am | News | Comments

SRI International and the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO), Japan's largest public R&D management organization, are establishing a collaborative program to identify and nurture promising research projects to result in building successful startup companies in Japan.

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LANL announces Express Licensing program

August 6, 2013 9:41 am | News | Comments

With the launch of a new “Express Licensing” program, access to innovative technology invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has gotten easier. The new licensing alternative was announced by David Pesiri, Dir. of LANL’s Technology Transfer Div.

Ready-to-sign license speeds up tech transfer

July 31, 2013 8:15 am | News | Comments

Sandia National Laboratories is building a portfolio of intellectual property (IP) that can be licensed by businesses in as little as an hour. Sandia’s goal is to get more of the national laboratories’ innovations into the hands of small businesses and entrepreneurs. Sandia has about 1,300 patents available for licensing.

EU, U.S. to extend cooperation on measurements, standards

July 25, 2013 8:08 am | News | Comments

The European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the U.S. Dept. of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) this week agreed to expand their current scientific cooperation to include new areas of research, such as energy, health care and clinical measurements, and food safety and nutrition.

China's online population rises to 519 million

July 17, 2013 10:04 am | News | Comments

China's population of Internet users has grown to 591 million, driven by a 20% rise over the past year in the number of people who surf the Web from smartphones and other wireless devices, an industry group reported Wednesday. The rise of Web use has driven the growth of new Chinese industries from online shopping and microblogs to online video.

Experts say U.S. spy alliance will survive Snowden

July 16, 2013 9:34 am | by Nick Perry and Paisley Dodds, Associated Press | News | Comments

American information is so valuable, experts say, that no amount of global outrage over secret U.S. surveillance powers would cause Britain, Canada, Australia and New Zealand to ditch their collaborative spying arrangement: the Five Eyes. Revelations from NSA leaker Edward Snowden, they say, are unlikely to stop or even slow the global growth of secret-hunting—an increasingly critical factor in the security and prosperity of nations.

PayPal looks to conquer space (payments)

June 28, 2013 9:42 am | by Barbara Ortutay, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

eBay Inc.'s payments business, PayPal, says it is launching an initiative called PayPal Galactic with the help of the nonprofit SETI Institute and the Space Tourism Society, an industry group focused on space travel. Its goal, PayPal says, is to work out how commerce will work in space. In addition to regulatory and technical issues, even the currency that is to be used is up for debate.

NIST to create center for advanced materials research

June 27, 2013 8:17 am | News | Comments

The National Institute of Standards and Technology this week announced that it plans to establish a new Advanced Materials Center of Excellence to facilitate collaborations between NIST and researchers from academia and industry on advanced materials development. Fund at about $25 million over five years, the center will emphasize innovations in measurement technology, modeling, simulation, and data and informatics tools

Power plant limits at center of president's climate plan

June 25, 2013 6:50 am | by Johs Lederman and Matthew Daly, Associated Press | News | Comments

In a speech Tuesday at Georgetown University, Barack Obama is expected to announce he's issuing a presidential memorandum to launch the first-ever federal regulations on carbon dioxide emitted by existing power plants, moving to curb the gases blamed for global warming despite adamant opposition from Republicans and some energy producers.

FAA moving toward easing electronic device use

June 24, 2013 9:09 am | by Joan Lowy and Scott Mayerowitz, Associated Press | News | Comments

Relief may be on the way for airline passengers who can't bear to be separated even briefly from their personal electronic devices. The government is moving toward allowing gate-to-gate use of music players, tablets, laptops, smartphones and other gadgets. Howeveer, restrictions on cellphone calls and Internet use and transmission are not expected to be changed.

Rice Alliance named top global university business incubator

June 7, 2013 3:42 pm | News | Comments

Rice Univ.’s Rice Alliance for Technology and Entrepreneurship has been named the top global university business incubator of 2013, according to the first in-depth study by the University Business Incubator (UBI) Index, based in Sweden. The UBI Index reviewed 550 university incubators around the world and performed a study of 150 university business incubators in 22 countries.

Report: R&D funding for businesses was virtually unchanged 2009-2010

June 6, 2013 1:36 pm | News | Comments

The National Science Foundation (NSF) this week released a report detailing the amount companies spent on U.S. research and development (R&D) during 2010. The numbers show this total was essentially unchanged from the amount spent in 2009, which was $282 billion. Of the $279 billion spent in 2010, the U.S. federal government provided $34 billion.

Cyber experts say calling out China may be working

June 5, 2013 5:51 pm | by Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press | News | Comments

After years of quiet and largely unsuccessful diplomacy, the U.S. has brought its persistent computer-hacking problems with China into the open, delivering a steady drumbeat of reports accusing Beijing's government and military of computer-based attacks against America. Officials say the new strategy may be having some impact.

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