Advertisement
Science Policy
Subscribe to Science Policy

The Lead

Geography matters: Model predicts how local “shocks” influence U.S. economy

August 7, 2014 8:57 am | by B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs | News | Comments

A team of economists including Esteban Rossi-Hansberg of Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs have developed a model that can measure the widespread effects of local industry fluctuations such as sudden closing of a major airline hub. Gauging the power of these fluctuations, or shocks, could be a useful tool when it comes to designing policies to manage past and future shocks.

Study shows how to power California with wind, water and sun

July 25, 2014 6:49 am | by Rob Jordan, Stanford Univ. | News | Comments

New Stanford Univ. research outlines the path to a...

NSF, NIH collaborate to accelerate advance of biomedical innovations

June 19, 2014 8:39 am | News | Comments

A new collaboration between the National Science...

Reports: Advances in microbial forensics needed to respond to outbreaks

June 10, 2014 9:53 am | News | Comments

Much as human DNA can be used as evidence in...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Report: NASA should maintain long-term focus on Mars as “horizon goal”

June 4, 2014 2:45 pm | News | Comments

A new congressionally mandated report from the National Research Council concludes that the expense of human spaceflight and the dangers to the astronauts involved can be justified only by the goal of putting humans on other worlds. The authors recommend a disciplined “pathway” approach that eventually leads to the “horizon goal” of putting humans on Mars.

New data say foreign graduate enrollment in S&E continues to rise

May 27, 2014 9:39 am | News | Comments

The number of citizens and permanent residents enrolled in S&E graduate programs in the United States declined in 2012, while the number of foreign students studying on temporary visas increased, according to new data from the National Science Foundation.

Physics panel to feds: Beam us up some neutrinos

May 23, 2014 8:11 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

A committee of experts told the federal government Thursday that the U.S. should build a billion-dollar project to beam ghostlike subatomic particles 800 miles underground from Chicago to South Dakota. The proposed invisible neutrino beam, which would shed light on the behavior of these particles, would be the biggest U.S. particle physics projects in many years, but still much smaller than Europe's Large Hadron Collider.

Advertisement

Britain launches $17 million science prize

May 20, 2014 9:33 am | News | Comments

Britain is offering 10 million pounds (almost $17 million) to whoever can solve one of humanity's biggest scientific challenges. What’s the challenge? Organizers said Monday the public would vote on which of six challenges the prize should tackle, ranging from reversal of paralysis to making air travel environmentally friendly.

New data show how states are doing in science

May 16, 2014 8:08 am | News | Comments

A newly updated, online, interactive state data tool published by the National Science Board is enabling policymakers, educators, and other users to discern trends in education, science and research in each of the 50 states. The tool features 59 state indicators of state performance in education, the scientific workforce, R&D investments and activities, and high-tech business.

Synthetic biology still in uncharted waters of public opinion

May 15, 2014 12:36 pm | News | Comments

The Synthetic Biology Project at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is releasing the results of a new set of focus groups, which find continued low awareness of synthetic biology among the general public. The focus group results support the findings of a 2013 national poll that found just 23% of respondents reported they had heard a lot (6%) or some (17%) about synthetic biology.

Wyoming is first state to reject science standards

May 8, 2014 7:03 pm | by Bob Moen, Associated Press | News | Comments

Wyoming, the nation's top coal-producing state, is the first to reject new K-12 science standards proposed by national education groups mainly because of global warming components. The Wyoming Board of Education decided recently that the Next Generation Science Standards need more review after questions were raised about the treatment of man-made global warming.

Study: Creativity and innovation need to talk more

April 9, 2014 9:32 am | by Jeff Falk, Rice Univ. | News | Comments

Creativity and innovation are not sufficiently integrated in either the business world or academic research, according to a new study from several universities. The study proposes 60 specific research questions for future studies as well as 11 themes that warrant greater attention from researchers. They include the roles of customers, the Internet and social media and leadership style in the creativity-innovation cycle.

Advertisement

NIH opens new research facility dedicated to study of the brain

April 1, 2014 3:44 pm | News | Comments

The National Institutes of Health held a scientific symposium and a dedication ceremony March 31 to April 1, 2014, to celebrate the completion of the John Edward Porter Neuroscience Research Center. This state of the art facility brings together neuroscientists from 10 institutes and centers across the NIH in an effort to spur new advances in our understanding of the nervous system in health and disease.

Conference to assess China’s international science, technology relations

March 31, 2014 3:08 pm | News | Comments

A first-of-its kind conference examining the role of China’s evolving international science and technology relationships will take place April 3-4 at Arizona State Univ.’s Tempe campus. The conference, called “The Evolving Role of Science and Technology in China’s International Relations,” hopes to enable a more thorough understanding of the multiple dimensions of China’s external science and technology collaborations.

NSF creates industry electrochemical research center at Ohio Univ.

March 24, 2014 1:57 pm | News | Comments

The Center for Electrochemical Engineering at Ohio Univ. has received a National Science Foundation (NSF) award to establish a new industry university cooperative research center in Athens, Ohio, with partner site Washington Univ.-St. Louis. The new center will focus on electrochemical alternatives to conventional chemical and biological processes, with the goal of enhancing advanced production capabilities.

Study: Industry-sponsored academic inventions spur increased innovation

March 20, 2014 7:57 am | by Bobbie Mixon, NSF | News | Comments

Industry-sponsored academic research leads to innovative patents and licenses, says a new analysis led by Brian Wright, Univ. of California, Berkeley prof. of agricultural and resource economics. The finding calls into question assumptions that corporate support skews science toward inventions that are less accessible and less useful to others than those funded by the government or non-profit organizations.

Report compiles quantitative information on S&E

February 12, 2014 12:00 pm | by National Science Foundation | News | Comments

Science and Engineering Indicators (SEI) is first and foremost a volume of record comprising the major high-quality quantitative data on the U.S. and international science and engineering enterprise. SEI is factual and policy neutral. It doesn’t offer policy options, and it doesn’t make policy recommendations.

Advertisement

What your company can learn from NASA's tragedies

January 31, 2014 8:59 am | News | Comments

Since the 2003 Columbia shuttle disaster, business professor Peter Madsen at Brigham Young Univ. has examined how NASA recognizes “near-misses”, where narrowly averted failures result in successful outcomes. A new study of NASA’s safety climate finds that recognition of those near-misses goes up when the significance of a project is emphasized, and when organizational leaders emphasize safety relative to other goals, such as efficiency.

Merck joins companies ending chimpanzee research

January 31, 2014 8:38 am | News | Comments

Drugmaker Merck & Co. is joining two dozen other pharmaceutical companies and contract laboratories in committing to not use chimpanzees for research. The growing trend could mean roughly 1,000 chimps in the U.S. used for research or warehoused for many years in laboratory cages could be "retired" to sanctuaries by around 2020.

Study: Biological donors should have access to own biobank data

January 24, 2014 11:54 am | News | Comments

Databanks containing information and biological materials from individuals are a crucial resource for research, but they are currently accessible only to researchers. In a recent paper published in Science, experts say that donors should have unrestricted access to data derived from their own material and that advanced technology means allowing such access is today a question of will rather than feasibility.

Senate passes spending bill with increases for NASA, DOE

January 17, 2014 9:07 am | by Andrew Taylor, Associated Press | News | Comments

Congress sent President Barack Obama a $1.1 trillion government-wide spending bill Thursday, The huge bill funds every agency of government, pairing increases for NASA, the Dept. of Energy and the National Institutes of Health with cuts to the Internal Revenue Service and foreign aid. Among the things, the budget increase at NASA will allow the International Space Station to operate to at least 2024.

Study: Copycats pave the way to problem-solving success

January 15, 2014 9:07 am | News | Comments

It is often better to be surrounded by copycats than innovators, according to a new Indiana Univ. study that created a virtual problem landscape to explore the advantages and disadvantages of “social learning”. The researchers thought at first it would be better to have innovators around, but in their experiments imitators offered the greater benefit.

Researchers propose alternative way to allocate science funding

January 8, 2014 2:15 pm | News | Comments

According Indiana Univ.’s Johan Bollen, lead author of study that propose a new way to distributes grant money, the peer review process for grant proposals requires a significant burden of time, energy and effort in writing and reviewing. Bollen’s new method depends on a collective distribution of funding by the scientific community and requires only a fraction of the costs associated with the traditional approach.

NSF study details recent R&D growth

January 6, 2014 8:20 am | News | Comments

New data collected by the National Science Foundation have resulted in an upward revision in the previously published 2011 U.S. R&D performance total, and further expansion of U.S. R&D performance is indicated for 2012. These new data put U.S. R&D expenditures at $428.2 billion in 2011, an increase of $20.5 billion over 2010. The preliminary estimate of the 2012 U.S. total for R&D is $452.6 billion.

UNOS to oversee hand, face transplants like organs

December 27, 2013 10:39 am | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The government is preparing to regulate the new field of hand and face transplants like it does standard organ transplants, giving more Americans who are disabled or disfigured by injury, illness or combat a chance at this radical kind of reconstruction. The United Network for Organ Sharing, or UNOS, will develop the new policies over the next few months.

A Strategic Balance

December 10, 2013 4:45 pm | by Paul Livingstone | Thermo Fisher Scientific | Articles | Comments

As part of its R&D 100 Awards program, the editors of R&D Magazine hold an annual roundtable discussion that addresses outstanding trends and issues in research and development. This year, the Industry Executives’ Roundtable, held Nov. 7, 2013, in Orlando, Fla., focused on industrial research, featuring executives from several organizations that invest heavily in R&D efforts. These organizations all won 2013 R&D 100 Awards.

Friendly information signs reduce vandalism on scientific equipment

November 27, 2013 6:12 am | News | Comments

Damage to or theft of technical equipment represents a dramatic financial and scientific loss to researchers. Scientists in Germany decided to find out whether the information content and tone of labels attached to the equipment could reduce the incidence of vandalism. They found that a friendly, personal label reduced the interaction of people with the equipment in comparison with neutral or threatening labels.

Study: Research funding has become prone to bubble formation

November 22, 2013 11:12 am | News | Comments

According to a recent study, fashions in research funding, reward structures in universities and streamlining of scientific agendas undermine traditional academic norms and may result in science bubbles. New research shows how the mechanisms that set off the financial crisis might be replicating in the field of science.

Researchers address economic dangers of “peak oil”

October 16, 2013 3:08 pm | News | Comments

Experts from the Univ. of Maryland and a leading university in Spain demonstrate in a new study which sectors could put the entire U.S. economy at risk when global oil production peaks. This multi-disciplinary team recommends immediate action by government, private and commercial sectors to reduce the vulnerability of these sectors.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading