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Fast-growing fish may never wind up on your plate

December 5, 2012 10:45 am | by Matthew Perrone, AP Health Writer | News | Comments

After weathering concerns about everything from the safety of humans eating the salmon to their impact on the environment, Aquabounty was in a position to become the world's first company to sell fish whose DNA has been altered to speed up growth. But after positive feedback from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2010, the agency still has not approved the fish and the company could soon run out of money.

Judge backs NASA lab in work discrimination case

November 5, 2012 10:32 am | News | Comments

A California judge has tentatively ruled in favor of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in a wrongful termination lawsuit brought by a former computer specialist who alleged he was singled out in part because of his belief in intelligent design.

Bioethics panel urges more gene privacy protection

October 11, 2012 5:53 pm | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

A presidential commission found that it is legally possible in about half of U.S. states to decode a person’s DNA from a sample without their knowledge. Such information could be used to predict what diseases lurk in the person’s future. Although such whole genome sequencing is too costly now to permit abuse, the collision of privacy and genetics is prompting calls for action.

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Article: New technology being stymied by copyright law

September 17, 2012 5:08 am | News | Comments

From Napster to iTunes to Pandora, the methods by which the public can obtain and share music have rapidly progressed. Future groundbreaking innovations may need to wait, though, as the next generation of technology is being stymied by the very copyright laws that seek to protect the industry, says Rutgers-Camden University professor Michael Carrier in a new article for a law journal..

EPA releases nanomaterial case study regarding nanoscale silver

August 6, 2012 6:05 am | News | Comments

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has completed and published a comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) framework study of engineered nanoscale silver, specifically with regard to its behavior in disinfectant sprays. Though not a formal assessment, many factors such as product life cycle, environmental transport and fate, exposure-dose in receptors, and potential impacts in these receptors are covered in the report.

Gas drilling research suffers from lack of funding

August 2, 2012 10:28 am | by Kevin Begos, Associated Press | News | Comments

Is gas drilling ruining the air, polluting water and making people sick? The evidence is sketchy and inconclusive, but a lack of serious funding is delaying efforts to resolve those pressing questions and creating a vacuum that could lead to a crush of lawsuits, some experts say.

23andMe seeks FDA approval for personal DNA test

August 1, 2012 3:24 am | by Matthew Perrone, AP Health Writer | News | Comments

For years, the Silicon Valley company has resisted government regulation, arguing that it simply provides consumers with information, not a medical service. Genetic test maker 23andMe, however, is now asking the Food and Drug Administration to approve its personalized DNA test in a move that, if successful, could boost acceptance of technology that is viewed skeptically by leading scientists who question its usefulness.

New carbon accounting method to reduce nitrogen fertilizer use

July 18, 2012 7:27 pm | News | Comments

In 2011, corn was planted on more than 92 million acres in the U.S. Because corn is a nitrogen-loving plant, farmers must use synthetic nitrogen fertilizer to their fields every year to achieve their crop target. However, nitrogen is hard to contain and can negatively affect the environment. Researchers have come up with a solution, however, and it’s tied to the relationship between nitrates and nitrous oxide emissions.

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FDA advisers recommend approving weight loss drug

May 11, 2012 9:35 am | by Linda A. Johnson, AP Business Writer | News | Comments

Advisers to government health regulators late Thursday recommended that they approve sales of what would be the first new prescription weight-loss drug in the U.S. in more than a decade, despite concerns over cardiac risks.

ICANN offers refunds to domain name applicants

May 9, 2012 6:03 am | News | Comments

The organization behind a major expansion of Internet address suffixes is offering full refunds to companies and organizations affected by a weeks-long delay in taking proposals.

FDA review favors first drug for HIV prevention

May 9, 2012 5:32 am | by Matthew Perrone, AP Health Writer | News | Comments

A pill that has long been used to treat HIV has moved one step closer to becoming the first drug approved to prevent healthy people from becoming infected with the virus that causes AIDS. The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday that Gilead Sciences' Truvada appears to be safe and effective for HIV prevention.

First of two papers on lab-made bird flu published

May 3, 2012 5:09 am | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Four months ago the U.S. government sought to block publication of two studies about how scientists created an easily spread form of bird flu. Now a revised version of one paper is seeing the light of day with the government's blessing. The second paper, which is more controversial because it involves what appears to be a more dangerous virus, is expected to be published later.

Hubbub over content rights greets Google Drive

April 26, 2012 1:55 pm | by Michael Liedtke, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Shortly after Tuesday's release of the long-awaited Google Drive service, technology blogs and Twitter users were picking apart a legal clause that made it sound as if all the users' content stored in Google Drive automatically would become the intellectual property of Google Inc. As it turns out, the worries are probably unfounded.

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FDA issues draft guidance on nanotechnology

April 22, 2012 1:41 pm | News | Comments

The U.S. government has issued its initial draft guidelines on the use of nanotechnology, particularly nanoparticles, in food and cosmetic products. These recommendations, intended to help guarantee consumer safety within these two industries, do not extend to the other products that fall under Food and Drug Administration oversights, such as drugs and medical devices.

China sets up rare earths industry group

April 9, 2012 8:39 am | by Elaine Kurtenbach, AP Business Writer | News | Comments

With about a third of the world's rare earth reserves and supplying 90% of what is consumed, China has come under fire for imposing limits on rare earths production and exports. In response, the country has begun an industry association designed fend off these complaints and administer greater regulation of the sector.

FDA rejects call to ban BPA from food packaging

April 3, 2012 10:27 am | by Matthew Perrone, AP Health Writer | News | Comments

Despite concern from some scientists who believe exposure to BPA can harm the reproductive and nervous systems of humans, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has turned down a petition from environmentalists that would have banned the plastic-hardening chemical bisphenol-A from all food and drink packaging, including plastic bottles and canned food.

Panel backs sharing studies of lab-made bird flu

April 2, 2012 5:24 am | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

On Friday, the U.S. government's biosecurity advisers said they support publishing research studies showing how scientists made new easy-to-spread forms of bird flu because the studies, now revised, don't reveal details bioterrorists could use. The announcement could end debate sparked by the government’s request last December that scientists refrain from publishing all the details of their work.

Japan, U.S., EU discuss rare earth supply security

March 29, 2012 4:10 am | by Elaine Kurtenbach, AP Business Writer | News | Comments

China holds about a third of the world's rare earth reserves but supplies about 90% of what is consumed. In the past two years it has imposed limits on its exports, citing a need to impose order on an unruly domestic market and to reduce environmental damage. Officials from the U.S. the European Union, and Japan met recently to propose ways to ensure secure supplies of strategically vital rare earths and other critical materials.

High court throws out human gene patents

March 27, 2012 12:07 pm | News | Comments

The Supreme Court this week threw out a lower court ruling allowing human genes to be patented. The court overturned patents belonging to Myriad Genetics Inc. of Salt Lake City on two genes linked to increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer.

U.S. announces deal to ensure medical isotope supply

March 26, 2012 9:54 am | News | Comments

Medical isotopes are used to treat cancer and heart disease worldwide, but have been typically been made using highly enriched uranium. This material can also be used to create nuclear bombs, which has prompted a recent agreement between several countries to ensure its future supply while improving security.

Report examines what U.S. can learn from EU chemicals law

February 29, 2012 9:21 am | News | Comments

U.S. industry and environmental groups agree that the Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976 needs to be modernized to better protect public health and the environment. However, there is no consensus on what the reform should look like. A new report from Indiana University supplies a close examination of the European Union's reformed chemicals law REACH, which went into effect in 2006.

Eight national labs streamline partnership agreements

February 27, 2012 5:43 pm | News | Comments

Intended to help cut red tape for business and startups wanting to do business with the U.S. Dept. of Energy’s research laboratories, the new Agreements for Commercializing Technology (ACT) program was recently launched as a third alternative to the two preceding options: signing a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) or a Work For Others (WFO) Agreement.

Litigator publishes guide to nanotech health law

January 30, 2012 3:49 am | News | Comments

John Delaney, an attorney with experience in toxic and environmental torts and a founding member of the law firm Delany & O’Brien in Philadelphia, has recently published guide to the legal implications of nanotechnology. He pays particular attention to carbon nanotubes and nanometal oxides, and notably argues for tort reform in anticipation of potential legal actions.

Protest exposes Silicon Valley-Hollywood rivalry

January 18, 2012 1:42 pm | News | Comments

Internet users quickly learned about the standoff between technology companies and Hollywood on Wednesday. Google blacked out its name, Reddit shut down for 12 hours, and Wikipedia blacked out its main site for the full day. At issue are two congressional proposals intended to limit online piracy of movies and TV programs.

Economy, Energy, and Entrepreneurship

December 15, 2011 4:13 am | by R&D Editors | Articles | Comments

Federally funded research can be a solution to some of the nation's top challenges, say government laboratory executives.

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