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Wyoming is first state to reject science standards

May 8, 2014 7:03 pm | by Bob Moen, Associated Press | News | Comments

Wyoming, the nation's top coal-producing state, is the first to reject new K-12 science standards proposed by national education groups mainly because of global warming components. The Wyoming Board of Education decided recently that the Next Generation Science Standards need more review after questions were raised about the treatment of man-made global warming.

Obama admin drives ahead with new cleaner gas rule

March 3, 2014 2:22 pm | by Josh Lederman - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The Obama administration is driving ahead with a dramatic reduction in sulfur in gasoline and...

Smartphones may get kill switch

February 10, 2014 12:07 pm | by Terry Collins, Associated Press | News | Comments

Legislation unveiled in California would require smartphones and other mobile devices to have a...

A Strategic Balance

December 10, 2013 4:45 pm | by Paul Livingstone | Articles | Comments

As part of its R&D 100 Awards program, the editors of R&D Magazine hold an...

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Colorado's proposed emissions rules get a hearing

November 21, 2013 6:58 pm | by KRISTEN WYATT - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Colorado's proposal to curb air pollutants from oil and gas operations got praise from industry representatives and environmental activists Thursday at its first hearing. But both sides warned the Colorado Air Quality Control Commission that there will still be haggling over the particulars of three rule changes introduced this week.

Study: Better police surveillance technologies come with a cost

November 11, 2013 2:07 pm | by Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor, Univ. of Illinois | News | Comments

The widespread use of advanced surveillance technologies by state and local police departments will improve the efficiency of criminal investigations. But a lack of oversight and regulation poses significant privacy concerns, warns Stephen Rushin, a professor of law at the Univ. of Illinois.

Clean Air Act has improved water quality in the Chesapeake Bay watershed

November 7, 2013 7:00 am | News | Comments

A new study shows that the reduction of pollution emissions from power plants in the mid-Atlantic is making an impact on the quality of the water that ends up in the Chesapeake Bay. The study confirms a decreased amount of emissions of nitrogen oxide from coal-fired power plants.

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Study: Hefty soda tax would reduce U.K. obesity

October 31, 2013 7:31 pm | by MARIA CHENG - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Slapping a 20% tax on soda in Britain could cut the number of obese adults by about 180,000, according to a new study. Though the number works out to a modest drop of 1.3% in obesity, scientists say that reduction would still be worthwhile in the U.K., which has a population of about 63 million and is the fattest country in Western Europe. About one in four Britons is obese.

Obama moves to limit power-plant carbon pollution

September 20, 2013 3:40 pm | by DINA CAPPIELLO - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Linking global warming to public health, disease and extreme weather, the Obama administration pressed ahead Friday with tough requirements to limit carbon pollution from new power plants, despite protests from industry and Republicans that it would dim coal's future. The proposal, which would set the first national limits on heat-trapping pollution from future power plants, is intended to help reshape where Americans get electricity.

California vies for new space industry

August 28, 2013 7:52 am | by Mihir Zaveri, Associated Press | News | Comments

As several new private ventures to take people on trips to space come closer to becoming reality, California lawmakers are racing other states to woo the new space companies with cushy incentives. They are debating a bill now in Sacramento that would insulate manufacturers of spaceships and parts suppliers from liability should travelers get injured or killed on a voyage, except in cases such as gross negligence or intentional wrongdoing.

Miss. nuclear waste plan sparks early opposition

August 26, 2013 9:19 pm | by JEFF AMY - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The Mississippi Energy Institute is pushing for more exploration of storing and reprocessing used nuclear fuel in the state at the same time that one of the its congressmen is coming out against it. Leaders of the institute, which promotes energy development, pitched ideas to the state Senate Economic Development Committee.

Miss. regulators approve energy-efficiency rules

July 12, 2013 9:41 am | by JEFF AMY - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Mississippi electric and natural gas utilities will soon be paying for their customers to cut energy use. The state Public Service Commission voted unanimously Thursday to adopt energy efficiency rules requiring all gas and electric companies with more than 25,000 customers to begin offering programs within six months.

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Activists warn trade pact will keep out generics

July 3, 2013 4:42 am | by EILEEN NG - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A free trade pact being negotiated by the U.S. and 11 Asia-Pacific nations will impose aggressive intellectual property rules that will restrict access to affordable medicines in developing nations, health activists warned Wednesday. The 12 countries will start an 18th round of talks in Malaysia on July 15 and hope to complete negotiations by October.

NIH to retire most chimps from medical research

June 26, 2013 1:49 pm | by LAURAN NEERGAARD - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

It's official: The National Institutes of Health plans to end most use of chimpanzees in government medical research, saying humans' closest relatives "deserve special respect." The NIH announced Wednesday that it will retire about 310 government-owned chimpanzees from research over the next few years, and keep only 50 others essentially on retainer.

Power plant limits at center of president's climate plan

June 25, 2013 6:50 am | by Johs Lederman and Matthew Daly, Associated Press | News | Comments

In a speech Tuesday at Georgetown University, Barack Obama is expected to announce he's issuing a presidential memorandum to launch the first-ever federal regulations on carbon dioxide emitted by existing power plants, moving to curb the gases blamed for global warming despite adamant opposition from Republicans and some energy producers.

U.S. court says human genes cannot be patented

June 13, 2013 11:53 am | by JESSE J. HOLLAND - Associated Press Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that companies cannot patent parts of naturally-occurring human genes, a decision with the potential to profoundly affect the emerging and lucrative medical and biotechnology industries. The high court's unanimous judgment reverses three decades of patent awards by government officials.

U.S. to remove controversial X-ray scanners

January 18, 2013 2:53 pm | by JOSHUA FREED - AP Business Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Those airport scanners with their all-too revealing body images will soon be going away. The Transportation Security Administration says the X-ray scanners will be gone by June because the company that makes them can't fix the privacy issues. The other airport body scanners, which produce a generic outline instead of a naked image, are staying.

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Doubling down on energy efficiency

January 18, 2013 11:15 am | by Allan Chen, Berkeley Lab | News | Comments

Recent research at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory finds utility customer-funded energy efficiency programs expanding across the United States. Spending on these programs, which are funded by mandatory charges on utility bills, will double to nearly $10 billion per year by 2025. Drivers for this growth include energy efficiency resource standards required of utilities.

Report says warming is changing U.S. daily life

January 13, 2013 7:01 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

A special panel of scientists convened by the government issued Friday a 1,146-page draft report that details in dozens of ways how climate change is already disrupting the health, homes and other facets of daily American life. The blunt report takes a global environmental issue and explains what it means for different U.S. regions, for various sectors of the economy and for future generations.

Science and engineering students petition Congress to stop sequestration

December 7, 2012 9:33 am | News | Comments

Mandatory cuts to federal funding as outlined in the Budget Control Act, known as sequestration, will take place in early January, unless Congress takes action. More than 6,000 science and engineering students have hand-delivered a petition to the local offices of U.S. senators and House leaders, requesting that sequestration be halted because it would harm their future as innovators and hurt economic growth in the United States.

How biotech will benefit from new patent laws

May 1, 2012 5:48 pm | News | Comments

Industrial biotechnology companies rely heavily on patents to attract investment to fund R&D. The recent America Invents Act stands to have a significant impact on technology innovators such as biotech firms, and two recently published papers from patent law experts help explain the extent of these shifts.

Study: Clean energy scale-up needs reality check

May 1, 2012 5:30 pm | by Mark Golden, Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford University | News | Comments

In a post-Solyndra, budget-constrained world, the transition to a decarbonized energy system faces great hurdles. Overcoming these hurdles will require smarter and more focused policies. Two Stanford writers outline their visions in a pair of analyses.

A divided Congress confronts a rising cyberthreat

April 23, 2012 8:44 am | by Donna Cassata and Richard Lardner, Associated Press | News | Comments

As cyber attacks worsen and the tactics employed by hackers grow more nefarious, Congress is being asked to consider legislation to improve defenses for government, municipal, and corporate networks. However, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and other business groups are applying pressure from the other side, saying the rules would cost money without improving risk.

Feds, five states to push for Great Lakes wind farms

April 1, 2012 3:18 pm | by John Flesher, AP Environmental Writer | News | Comments

The Great Lakes currently have no offshore wind turbines, but several plans to install them are in the works. Both federal and state governments are about to announce an agreement to speed up approval of the farms, which have been delayed by cost concerns and public opposition.

Protest exposes Silicon Valley-Hollywood rivalry

January 18, 2012 1:42 pm | News | Comments

Internet users quickly learned about the standoff between technology companies and Hollywood on Wednesday. Google blacked out its name, Reddit shut down for 12 hours, and Wikipedia blacked out its main site for the full day. At issue are two congressional proposals intended to limit online piracy of movies and TV programs.

Economy, Energy, and Entrepreneurship

December 15, 2011 4:13 am | by R&D Editors | Articles | Comments

Federally funded research can be a solution to some of the nation's top challenges, say government laboratory executives.

Economy, Energy, and Entrepreneurship: Argonne National Laboratory

December 15, 2011 3:57 am | by R&D Editors | Articles | Comments

Argonne National Laboratory's Deborah Clayton speaks on topics including funding, peer review, entrepreneurship, nanotechnology research, and communicating research missions in a social networking environment.

Economy, Energy, and Entrepreneurship: Los Alamos National Laboratory

December 15, 2011 3:54 am | by R&D Editors | Articles | Comments

Los Alamos National Laboratory's David Pesiri speaks on topics including funding, peer review, entrepreneurship, nanotechnology research, and communicating research missions in a social networking environment.

Economy, Energy, and Entrepreneurship: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

December 15, 2011 3:49 am | by R&D Editors | Articles | Comments

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Erik Stenehjem speaks on topics including funding, peer review, entrepreneurship, nanotechnology research, and communicating research missions in a social networking environment.

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