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Researcher charged in major HIV vaccine fraud case

June 24, 2014 5:22 pm | by Ryan J. Foley - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Responding to a major case of research misconduct, federal prosecutors are taking a rare step by charging a scientist with fraud after he admitted falsifying data while researching an HIV vaccine. Authorities say former Iowa State Univ. laboratory manager Dong-Pyou Han has confessed to manipulating data that helped his team get millions in grants and increased hopes of a major breakthrough in AIDS research.

U.S. safety board faults key device in BP oil spill

June 5, 2014 1:16 pm | by Seth Borenstein - AP Science Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A U.S. board's investigation into the 2010 BP oil spill concludes that a last-ditch safety...

Google, Apple settle high-tech workers' lawsuit

April 24, 2014 7:22 pm | by Michael Liedtke - AP Technology Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Google, Apple, Intel and Adobe Systems have settled a class-action lawsuit alleging they...

Samsung: Patents developed by Google engineers

April 2, 2014 6:24 am | by Martha Mendoza, AP National Writer | News | Comments

Samsung fired back at Apple's accusations of...

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3-D printing creates murky product liability issues

December 13, 2013 8:47 am | Videos | Comments

While 3-D printing empowers people to create amazing objects once unimagined, it also raises red flags on the legal concept of strict product liability, according to a Stanford Univ. law professor. Nora Freeman Engstrom published her research exploring how 3-D printing is poised to challenge the American litigation landscape. 3-D printers can produce elaborate 3-D products of almost any shape, working from designs on a computer screen.

S. Korea court: Apple didn't violate Samsung patents

December 12, 2013 5:03 pm | by Youkyung Lee, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

A Seoul court rejected Samsung's claim that iPhone and iPad models violated three of its patents, another setback for the South Korean electronics giant in a global battle with Apple over rights to technologies that power smartphones and tablets.

Suit challenging Google's digital library dropped

November 14, 2013 3:51 pm | by Tom Hays, Associated Press | News | Comments

A federal judge on Thursday tossed out a class-action lawsuit brought by authors against Google Inc., clearing the way for the Internet giant to create the world's largest digital library. Google already has scanned more than 20 million books for the project. The Authors Guild, which brought the suit, was seeking $750 for each copyrighted book that was copied.

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Governments mining Google for more personal data

November 14, 2013 2:50 pm | News | Comments

Google has become less likely to comply with government demands for its users' online communications and other activities as authorities in the U.S. and other countries become more aggressive about mining the Internet for personal data. Legal requests from governments for people’s data have risen 21% from the last half of last year.

Second Apple-Samsung trial in U.S. gets underway

November 12, 2013 6:36 pm | by Paul Elias, Associated Press | News | Comments

A federal judge and lawyers for the world's two biggest smartphone makers began picking a jury Tuesday to determine how much Samsung Electronics owes Apple for copying vital iPhone and iPad features. A previous jury had awarded Apple $1.05 billion, but a judge found the jury miscalculated the amount and ordered a new trial to determine how much Samsung should pay.

Study: Better police surveillance technologies come with a cost

November 11, 2013 2:07 pm | by Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor, Univ. of Illinois | News | Comments

The widespread use of advanced surveillance technologies by state and local police departments will improve the efficiency of criminal investigations. But a lack of oversight and regulation poses significant privacy concerns, warns Stephen Rushin, a professor of law at the Univ. of Illinois.

Appeals court to review approval of BP settlement

November 3, 2013 10:02 am | by MICHAEL KUNZELMAN - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A year ago, lawyers for BP and Gulf Coast residents and businesses took turns urging a federal judge to approve their settlement for compensating victims of the company's massive 2010 oil spill. However, the one-time allies will be at odds when an appeals court hears objections to the multibillion-dollar deal.

Federal trial over Gulf oil spill to resume

September 30, 2013 3:05 am | by MICHAEL KUNZELMAN - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The trial resumes Monday for the federal litigation spawned by BP's massive 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the company's response to the deadly disaster. At the start of the trial's second phase, U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier is expected to hear two hours of opening statements from lawyers for BP and for Gulf Coast residents and businesses who claim the spill cost them money.

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Court asked to uphold BP settlement approval

September 4, 2013 11:08 am | by MICHAEL KUNZELMAN - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Plaintiffs' attorneys who brokered a multibillion-dollar settlement with BP following the company's 2010 Gulf oil spill have asked a federal appeals court to uphold a judge's approval of the deal. Only a "paltry few objectors" have raised the "narrowest of concerns" about the settlement that U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier approved in December 2012, private lawyers said in a filing Tuesday with the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

California vies for new space industry

August 28, 2013 7:52 am | by Mihir Zaveri, Associated Press | News | Comments

As several new private ventures to take people on trips to space come closer to becoming reality, California lawmakers are racing other states to woo the new space companies with cushy incentives. They are debating a bill now in Sacramento that would insulate manufacturers of spaceships and parts suppliers from liability should travelers get injured or killed on a voyage, except in cases such as gross negligence or intentional wrongdoing.

U.K. bars trash cans from tracking people with Wi-Fi

August 14, 2013 11:38 am | by Raphael Satter, Associated Press | News | Comments

Officials demanded Monday that an advertising firm stop using a network of high-tech trash cans to track people walking through London's financial district. The Renew ad firm has been using technology embedded in the hulking receptacles to measure the Wi-Fi signals emitted by smartphones, and suggested that it would apply the concept of "cookies"—tracking files that follow Internet users across the Web—to the physical world.

Feds, family reach deal on use of DNA information

August 9, 2013 8:13 am | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Some 60 years ago, a doctor in Baltimore removed cancer cells from a poor black patient named Henrietta Lacks without her knowledge or consent. Those cells eventually helped lead to a multitude of medical treatments and lay the groundwork for the multibillion-dollar biotech industry. Now, for the first time, the Lacks family has been given a say over at least some research involving her cells.

Chinese inaction gives technology thieves a shield

August 8, 2013 6:01 am | by JOE McDONALD - AP Business Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

American prosecutors say Pangang Group aimed high. The Chinese state-owned company wanted a better process to make titanium dioxide, a white pigment used in paint, toothpaste and Oreo cookie filling. So it paid spies to steal it from industry giant DuPont.

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Experts say U.S. spy alliance will survive Snowden

July 16, 2013 9:34 am | by Nick Perry and Paisley Dodds, Associated Press | News | Comments

American information is so valuable, experts say, that no amount of global outrage over secret U.S. surveillance powers would cause Britain, Canada, Australia and New Zealand to ditch their collaborative spying arrangement: the Five Eyes. Revelations from NSA leaker Edward Snowden, they say, are unlikely to stop or even slow the global growth of secret-hunting—an increasingly critical factor in the security and prosperity of nations.

United Technologies merger settlement approved

May 29, 2013 4:49 pm | by FREDERIC J. FROMMER - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A federal judge has approved a settlement in which United Technologies Corp. will sell some of its assets as part of its $18.4 billion purchase of aerospace-parts maker Goodrich Corp., the largest merger in aircraft industry history. The settlement between Hartford, Connecticut-based United Technologies and the Justice Department was approved Wednesday by U.S. District Court Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson.

GlaxoSmithKline buys vaccine developer Okairos

May 29, 2013 4:10 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

British drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline PLC said Wednesday that it will buy Okairos AG for about $323 million, gaining the Swiss vaccine developer's products. GlaxoSmithKline said Okairos is studying vaccine technology that could be used in shots that can both prevent and cure infections or diseases.

Dow Chemical gets $2.2B Kuwait dispute payment

May 7, 2013 4:56 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Dow Chemical Co. said Tuesday it received a $2.2 billion payment from Petrochemical Industries Company of Kuwait, settling a dispute over a scrapped joint venture. A year ago, an international arbitration court awarded Dow $2.2 billion in damages stemming from Kuwait's move to withdraw from the joint venture.

Report: Blackstone drops out of race to buy Dell

April 18, 2013 11:18 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

There appears to be one less bidder pursuing an acquisition of slumping personal computer maker Dell. The Wall Street Journal reports that the Blackstone Group has retreated from its plans to submit an offer to buy most of Dell Inc.'s outstanding stock for $14.25 per share.

FDA approves first-of-its-kind diabetes drug from J&J

March 29, 2013 3:38 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved a first-of-its-kind diabetes drug from Johnson & Johnson that uses a new method to lower blood sugar—flushing it out in patients' urine. The agency cleared J&J's Invokana tablets for adults with Type 2 diabetes, which affects an estimated 26 million Americans. The once-a-day medication works by blocking the kidneys from reabsorbing sugar, which occurs at higher levels in patients with diabetes than in healthy patients.

3M and Avery Dennison resolve patent lawsuits

March 29, 2013 9:01 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Office products makers 3M Co. and Avery Dennison Corp. said Friday that they have resolved patent infringement lawsuits filed against each other related to certain reflective sheeting products used on traffic signs, pavement markings and other traffic control products.

DuPont drops Kevlar lawsuit against Easton-Bell

March 28, 2013 1:45 pm | by RANDALL CHASE - AP Business Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

DuPont Co. has dropped a federal lawsuit accusing sports equipment maker Easton-Bell Sports of misusing the Kevlar trademark in packaging for bicycle tires and locks. But the fight may not be over. DuPont's filing Thursday dismissing the lawsuit comes two days after a federal judge in California refused to dismiss or transfer to Delaware a lawsuit filed by Easton-Bell.

EPA settles with Goodrich over Calif. plant water

March 26, 2013 10:23 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Tuesday that it has reached a settlement worth at least $21.5 million with aerospace supplier Goodrich Corp. that will require the company to clean up a Southern California industrial site where chemicals contaminated the water supply.

Monsanto, DuPont Pioneer in licensing deals

March 26, 2013 9:38 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Agricultural products giant Monsanto and DuPont on Tuesday said they reached a deal to dismiss pending patent lawsuits against one another and entered a series of multi-million dollar licensing agreements. The lawsuits included antitrust and first-generation Roundup Ready soybean patent lawsuits pending in U.S. federal court in St. Louis. The licensing deals include a multi-year, royalty-bearing license for Monsanto Co.'s next-generation soybean technologies in the U.S. and Canada.

Dell board considers 2 new buyout offers

March 25, 2013 7:36 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Dell plans to negotiate with Blackstone Group and investor Carl Icahn over new acquisition bids for the computer maker that rival an offer of more than $24 billion from investors led by founder Michael Dell. Dell Inc. says a special committee of board members has determined the bids from buyout specialist Blackstone and Icahn could be superior to a proposal from Dell and Silver Lake Partners to buy the Texas company for $13.65 per share.

Ohio-based group buys BAE Systems division

February 25, 2013 7:03 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A Cincinnati-based security and defense products company says it has completed the purchase of the commercial armored vehicle division of BAE Systems for about $10 million. The CEO of the O'Gara Group Inc. and BAE Systems PLC said Monday that the O'Gara group completed the purchase of the West Chester-based BAE division.

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