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How to kick-start new energy technologies

January 3, 2012 3:05 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT News Office | News | Comments

The world desperately needs innovation in energy technologies—but those innovations are unlikely to happen by themselves. A three-year study by a team of researchers based at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has now identified a suite of policy and investment strategies that could accelerate innovation in the United States.

2012 Global R & D Funding Forecast Resources

December 15, 2011 6:27 am | by Martin Grueber, Research Leader, Battelle and Tim Studt, Editor-in-Chief, Advantage Business Media | Articles | Comments

The following Websites are good sources of information related to the global R&D enterprise. Much of the information in the 2012 Global R&D Funding Forecast was derived from these sources, which are certainly not all-inclusive.

Economy, Energy, and Entrepreneurship: Argonne National Laboratory

December 15, 2011 3:57 am | by R&D Editors | Articles | Comments

Argonne National Laboratory's Deborah Clayton speaks on topics including funding, peer review, entrepreneurship, nanotechnology research, and communicating research missions in a social networking environment.

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Economy, Energy, and Entrepreneurship: Los Alamos National Laboratory

December 15, 2011 3:54 am | by R&D Editors | Articles | Comments

Los Alamos National Laboratory's David Pesiri speaks on topics including funding, peer review, entrepreneurship, nanotechnology research, and communicating research missions in a social networking environment.

Economy, Energy, and Entrepreneurship: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

December 15, 2011 3:49 am | by R&D Editors | Articles | Comments

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Erik Stenehjem speaks on topics including funding, peer review, entrepreneurship, nanotechnology research, and communicating research missions in a social networking environment.

Economy, Energy, and Entrepreneurship: NASA Glenn Research Center

December 15, 2011 3:44 am | by R&D Editors | Articles | Comments

NASA Glenn Research Center's Ramon (Ray) Lugo III speaks on topics including funding, peer review, entrepreneurship, nanotechnology research, and communicating research missions in a social networking environment.

Economy, Energy, and Entrepreneurship: National Energy Technology Laboratory

December 15, 2011 3:39 am | by R&D Editors | Articles | Comments

National Energy Technology Laboratory's Paul E. King speaks on topics including funding, peer review, entrepreneurship, nanotechnology research, and communicating research missions in a social networking environment.

Economy, Energy, and Entrepreneurship: National Renewable Energy Laboratory

December 15, 2011 3:35 am | by R&D Editors | Articles | Comments

National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Bob Hawsey speaks on topics including funding, peer review, entrepreneurship, nanotechnology research, and communicating research missions in a social networking environment.

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Congress reaches deal on SBIR reauthorization

December 13, 2011 7:14 am | News | Comments

The Small Business Innovation Research and the Small Business Technology Transfer programs were both set to expire on Dec. 16, 2011. But on Monday evening, Congress successfully negotiated a long-term reauthorization.

Climate conference approves landmark deal

December 12, 2011 8:10 am | by Arthur Max, Associated Press | News | Comments

A U.N. climate conference reached a hard-fought agreement Sunday on a complex and far-reaching program meant to set a new course for the global fight against climate change for the coming decades. The United States was a reluctant supporter, concerned about agreeing to join an international climate system that likely would find much opposition in the U.S. Congress.

DOE to remove commercialization barriers between industry, labs

December 9, 2011 12:38 pm | News | Comments

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has announced that it intends to begin a new pilot initiative, called the Agreements for Commercializing Technology, to reduce some of the hurdles that prevent innovative companies from working with the DOE’s national laboratories.

Fuels expert: put practicality before policy

December 8, 2011 6:35 pm | News | Comments

A transportation fuels expert from Sandia National Laboratories says policy makers should consider such practical issues as the number of gas stations selling ethanol and how long it takes to get new transportation technologies to market as they introduce aggressive federal and state energy policies.

Carbon capture? Go for the source

December 6, 2011 3:34 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Since most of the world's governments have not yet enacted regulations to curb emissions of greenhouse gases, some experts have advocated the development of technologies to remove carbon dioxide directly from the air. But a new Massachusetts Institute of Technology study shows that, at least for the foreseeable future, such proposals are not realistic because their costs would vastly exceed those of blocking emissions right at the source, such as at the powerplants that burn fossil fuels.

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With changes, the grid can take it

December 5, 2011 7:52 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Over the next two decades, the United States electric grid will face unprecedented technological challenges stemming from the growth of distributed and intermittent new energy sources such as solar and wind power, as well as an expected influx of electric and hybrid vehicles that require frequent recharging. But a new Massachusetts Institute of Technology study concludes that the grid is most likely up to the challenge.

Report: geoengineering could save or destroy Earth

December 2, 2011 11:41 am | News | Comments

A report released late Thursday in London and discussed Friday at the U.N. climate conference in South Africa said that—in theory—reflecting a small amount of sunlight back into space before it strikes the Earth's surface would have an immediate and dramatic effect. But no one knows what the side effects would be.

U.K. spy agency asks hackers to crack code

December 2, 2011 3:56 am | by Cassandra Vinograd, Associated Press | News | Comments

Britain's electronic listening agency, GCHQ, quietly launched a cryptic Website last month featuring a box of code made up of numbers and letters. There is no branding on the site, only the phrase "Can you crack it?" and a box to type in an answer.

Efficiency metrics for energy storage devices need standardization

November 30, 2011 8:58 am | News | Comments

Solving the mystery of prematurely dead cell phone and laptop batteries may prove to be a vital step toward creating a sustainable energy grid, according to Drexel researcher Yury Gogotsi. In a newly published piece, Gogotsi calls for a new, standardized gauge of performance measurement for energy storage devices that are as small as those used in cell phones to as large as those used in the national energy grid.

Researchers draft blueprint to boost energy innovation

November 22, 2011 6:35 am | News | Comments

The United States government could save the economy hundreds of billions of dollars per year by 2050 by spending a few billion dollars more a year to spur innovations in energy technology, according to a new report by researchers at the Harvard Kennedy School.

Report sees safety risks in computerized medical records

November 9, 2011 8:12 am | by Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Associated Press | News | Comments

Computerized medical records have been sold as a powerful tool to improve patient safety, for example by automatically alerting a doctor to potential allergic reactions to a medication prescribed to a patient. But a report by a panel from the Institute of Medicine said such benefits shouldn't be taken for granted.

U.S. report blasts China, Russia for cybercrime

November 3, 2011 12:00 pm | News | Comments

For years, experts and officials have complained about cyberattacks emanating from China. Now, U.S. intelligence agencies have published a report that offers the first detailed public accusations from U.S. officials, saying computer attacks by foreign governments and corporate hackers are on the rise and represent a "persistent threat to U.S. economic security."

Survey finds public support for geoengineering research

October 24, 2011 11:54 am | News | Comments

The first international survey by a peer-reviewed journal on the public perception of geoengineering and solar radiation management has found that 72% of respondents approved research into these climate-manipulating techniques.

Moon rock sting terrifies California grandmother

October 24, 2011 7:18 am | by Thomas Watkins, Associated Press | News | Comments

Expecting the worst, NASA agents swept in on a 74-year-old woman in a Denny’s restaurant five months ago to recover what believed to be a moon rock being sold on the black market. The woman claimed the tiny speck of rock, encased in acrylic, was given to her husband by Neil Armstrong. Armstrong says otherwise, and NASA is silent on the case.

California adopts extensive 'cap-and-trade' plan

October 21, 2011 8:13 am | by Jason Dearen, Associated Press | News | Comments

On Thursday, California formally adopted the nation's most comprehensive so-called "cap-and-trade" system. The system will be an experiment by the world's eighth-largest economy to provide financial incentives for polluters to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Some businesses claim it will hurt job growth and increase electricity costs; proponents say it will do the opposite.

How foreign insects, diseases get into the United States

October 10, 2011 12:42 pm | by Tracie Cone, Associated Press | News | Comments

Dozens of foreign insects and plant diseases slipped undetected into the United States in the years after 9/11, when authorities were so focused on preventing another attack that they overlooked a pest explosion that threatened the quality of the nation's food supply.

First round of Innovation Corps awards announced

October 7, 2011 12:25 pm | News | Comments

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has selected 21 teams for the inaugural class of its I-Corp awards. Winning teams will receive guidance from private- and public-sector experts, participate in a specially designed training curriculum, and receive $50,000 to begin assessing the commercial readiness of their technology concepts.

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