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Japan, U.S., EU discuss rare earth supply security

March 29, 2012 4:10 am | by Elaine Kurtenbach, AP Business Writer | News | Comments

China holds about a third of the world's rare earth reserves but supplies about 90% of what is consumed. In the past two years it has imposed limits on its exports, citing a need to impose order on an unruly domestic market and to reduce environmental damage. Officials from the U.S. the European Union, and Japan met recently to propose ways to ensure secure supplies of strategically vital rare earths and other critical materials.

High court throws out human gene patents

March 27, 2012 12:07 pm | News | Comments

The Supreme Court this week threw out a lower court ruling allowing human genes to be patented. The court overturned patents belonging to Myriad Genetics Inc. of Salt Lake City on two genes linked to increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer.

U.S. announces deal to ensure medical isotope supply

March 26, 2012 9:54 am | News | Comments

Medical isotopes are used to treat cancer and heart disease worldwide, but have been typically been made using highly enriched uranium. This material can also be used to create nuclear bombs, which has prompted a recent agreement between several countries to ensure its future supply while improving security.

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President proposes national network for manufacturing innovation

March 10, 2012 6:49 am | News | Comments

After touring the Rolls-Royce Crosspointe jet engine disc manufacturing facility in Prince George, Va., on March 9, President Obama announced his intention to build a network of up to 15 manufacturing innovation institutes to serve as regional hubs of manufacturing excellence. The move is intended to make U.S. manufacturers more competitive and encourage investment.

Report examines what U.S. can learn from EU chemicals law

February 29, 2012 9:21 am | News | Comments

U.S. industry and environmental groups agree that the Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976 needs to be modernized to better protect public health and the environment. However, there is no consensus on what the reform should look like. A new report from Indiana University supplies a close examination of the European Union's reformed chemicals law REACH, which went into effect in 2006.

Eight national labs streamline partnership agreements

February 27, 2012 5:43 pm | News | Comments

Intended to help cut red tape for business and startups wanting to do business with the U.S. Dept. of Energy’s research laboratories, the new Agreements for Commercializing Technology (ACT) program was recently launched as a third alternative to the two preceding options: signing a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) or a Work For Others (WFO) Agreement.

Scientists see red on NASA cuts of Mars missions

February 27, 2012 5:06 pm | by Alicia Chang and Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writers | News | Comments

Earlier this month, the president's budget canceled joint U.S.-European robotic missions to Mars in 2016 and 2018. Now top science officials say they are scrambling to come up with a plan by the end of the summer for a cut-rate journey to the red planet in 2018. That's when Mars passes closest to Earth, something that only happens once every 15 years.

Radio conference approves bandwidth for ocean current tracking

February 27, 2012 3:10 am | News | Comments

The International Telecommunication Union, which coordinates global radio spectrum use, recently came to an agreement that provides specific radio frequency bands for ocean radars, which until now operated only on an informal basis and were subject to immediate shut-down if they caused interference with other radio systems. The new technology may eventually make real-time detection of tsunamis and oil spills possible.

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When (and where) work disappears

February 24, 2012 7:11 am | by Peter Dizikes, MIT News Office | News | Comments

A new study from Massachusetts Institute of Technology shows that the rapid rise in low-wage manufacturing industries overseas has had a significant impact on the United States. The disappearance of U.S. manufacturing jobs frequently leaves workers unemployed for years, if not permanently, while creating a drag on local economies and raising the amount of taxpayer-borne social insurance necessary to keep workers and their families afloat.

Ethanol mandate not the best option

February 13, 2012 3:50 am | News | Comments

Many people are willing to pay a premium for ethanol, but not enough to justify the government mandate for the corn-based fuel, a Michigan State University economist argues. Soren Andersen studied the demand for ethanol, or E85, in the United States. He found that when ethanol prices rose 10 cents per gallon, demand for ethanol fell only 12% to 16% on average.

NASA says Russian space woes no worry

February 7, 2012 3:20 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

NASA says it still has confidence in the quality of Russia's manned rockets, despite an embarrassing series of glitches and failures in the Russian space program. The Soyuz is still consider by NASA officials to be the world’s most reliable space system.

Experts say Gingrich moon base dreams not lunacy

January 31, 2012 10:53 am | by Seth Borenstein, Associated Press | News | Comments

Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich wants to create a lunar colony that he says could become a U.S. state. This, along with his plan to figure out the human brain and warnings about electromagnetic attacks have led some to cry science fiction. But mostly these ideas rooted in solid scientific foundations.

Report: Electronic health records still need work

January 27, 2012 10:41 am | by Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Associated Press | News | Comments

According to a report developed by medical professionals and technology experts and released by the Bipartisan Policy Center last Friday, the effort by hospitals and doctors’ office to go increasingly digital is being hampered by the lack of progress in allowing computer systems to exchange data the way financial companies do.

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Pharma's niche focus spurs U.S. aid for antibiotics

January 26, 2012 11:28 am | by Matthew Perrone, AP Health Writer | News | Comments

The pharmaceutical industry won approval to market a record number of new drugs for rare diseases last year, as a combination of scientific innovation and business opportunity spurred new treatments for diseases long-ignored by drug companies. Many of these so-called orphan drugs offer extra patent protections and faster government approval.

Beijing releases pollution data; U.S. figures higher

January 23, 2012 4:21 am | by Louise Watt, Associated Press | News | Comments

Caving to public pressure, Beijing environmental authorities started releasing more detailed air quality data Saturday that may better reflect how bad the Chinese capital's air pollution is. But one expert says measurements from the first day were low compared with data U.S. officials have been collecting for years.

DOE to spur construction of small modular nuclear reactors

January 20, 2012 12:04 pm | News | Comments

Through a draft Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) announced Friday, the U.S> Department of Energy plans to establish cost-shared agreements with private industry to support the design and licensing of small modular nuclear reactors (SMRs). About one-third the size of current nuclear plants, SMR are expected to both safer and cheaper to build and operate.

S & T report: Asian countries rapidly closing rank with U.S.

January 18, 2012 2:39 pm | News | Comments

In supporting science and technology (S&T), no country outranks the United States. But the margin is closing quickly as Asian nations invest heavily in knowledge-based economies, according to a new report from the National Science Board.

Protest exposes Silicon Valley-Hollywood rivalry

January 18, 2012 1:42 pm | News | Comments

Internet users quickly learned about the standoff between technology companies and Hollywood on Wednesday. Google blacked out its name, Reddit shut down for 12 hours, and Wikipedia blacked out its main site for the full day. At issue are two congressional proposals intended to limit online piracy of movies and TV programs.

Countries consider time out on the 'leap second'

January 18, 2012 5:33 am | by Frank Jordans, Associated Press | News | Comments

After a long decade of deliberation, United Nations member countries will cast their vote this week on an issue that lasts literally just a second. Leap seconds are necessary to prevent atomic clocks from speeding ahead of solar time, but the United States and other countries want to abolish it for all time.

Scientists say cut soot, methane to curb warming

January 13, 2012 1:37 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

An international team of scientists says it's figured out how to slow global warming in the short run and prevent millions of deaths from dirty air: Stop focusing so much on carbon dioxide.

How to kick-start new energy technologies

January 3, 2012 3:05 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT News Office | News | Comments

The world desperately needs innovation in energy technologies—but those innovations are unlikely to happen by themselves. A three-year study by a team of researchers based at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has now identified a suite of policy and investment strategies that could accelerate innovation in the United States.

2012 Global R & D Funding Forecast Resources

December 15, 2011 6:27 am | by Martin Grueber, Research Leader, Battelle and Tim Studt, Editor-in-Chief, Advantage Business Media | Articles | Comments

The following Websites are good sources of information related to the global R&D enterprise. Much of the information in the 2012 Global R&D Funding Forecast was derived from these sources, which are certainly not all-inclusive.

Economy, Energy, and Entrepreneurship: Argonne National Laboratory

December 15, 2011 3:57 am | by R&D Editors | Articles | Comments

Argonne National Laboratory's Deborah Clayton speaks on topics including funding, peer review, entrepreneurship, nanotechnology research, and communicating research missions in a social networking environment.

Economy, Energy, and Entrepreneurship: Los Alamos National Laboratory

December 15, 2011 3:54 am | by R&D Editors | Articles | Comments

Los Alamos National Laboratory's David Pesiri speaks on topics including funding, peer review, entrepreneurship, nanotechnology research, and communicating research missions in a social networking environment.

Economy, Energy, and Entrepreneurship: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

December 15, 2011 3:49 am | by R&D Editors | Articles | Comments

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Erik Stenehjem speaks on topics including funding, peer review, entrepreneurship, nanotechnology research, and communicating research missions in a social networking environment.

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