Advertisement
Ethics
Subscribe to Ethics

The Lead

Some scientists share better than others

October 22, 2014 2:31 pm | News | Comments

While astronomers and geneticists embrace the concept, the culture of ecology still has a ways to go. Research by Michigan State Univ., published in the current issue of Bioscience, explores the paradox that although ecologists share findings via scientific journals, they do not share the data on which the studies are built.

Tech-friendly cities struggle with new biz rules

September 29, 2014 9:12 am | by Philip Marcelo, Associated Press | News | Comments

A...

Researchers show that how fast you drive might reveal exactly where you are going

August 12, 2014 7:41 am | Videos | Comments

Rutgers Univ. researchers have shown that GPS...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Scientists withdraw claim about making stem cells

July 2, 2014 1:41 pm | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

In two papers published in January in the journal Nature, Japanese and American researchers said that they'd been able to transform ordinary mouse cells into versatile stem cells by exposing them to a mildly acidic environment. The scientists withdrew that claim Wednesday, admitting to "extensive" errors that meant they were “unable to say without a doubt" that the method works.

Carnegie Mellon, Microsoft Research automate privacy compliance for big data systems

May 21, 2014 1:56 pm | News | Comments

Web services companies make promises about how they will use personal information. But ensuring that millions of lines of code operate in ways consistent with privacy promises is difficult. A team from Carnegie Mellon Univ.and Microsoft Research has shown, however, that these compliance checks can be automated. Their prototype automated system is now running on the data analytics pipeline of Bing, Microsoft's search engine.

Study: New patenting guidelines are needed for biotechnology

April 23, 2014 7:34 am | News | Comments

Biotechnology scientists must be aware of the broad patent landscape and push for new patent and licensing guidelines, according to a new paper from Rice Univ.’s Baker Institute for Public Policy. The paper is based on the June 2013 U.S. Supreme Court ruling in the case Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics that naturally occurring genes are unpatentable.

Advertisement

Japan stem cell researcher says results valid

April 9, 2014 10:20 am | by Elaine Kurtenbach, Associated Press | News | Comments

The Japanese scientist accused of falsifying data in a widely heralded stem-cell research paper said Wednesday the results are valid despite mistakes in their presentation. Haruko Obokata, 30, struggled to maintain her composure during a televised news conference packed with hundreds of reporters, but insisted she did not tamper with the data to fabricate results.

Inventor of Web calls for digital bill of rights

March 12, 2014 8:50 am | Videos | Comments

The World Wide Web marks its 25th anniversary this year. On Wednesday, its inventor, Tim Berners-Lee, commented about the state of the Internet and about the need to defend principles that have made the Web successful. Named an R&D Scientist of the Year in 1996, Berners-Lee has been a long-time proponent of openness and neutrality on the Web.

Laboratory in Japan weighs retraction of stem cell paper

March 11, 2014 10:39 am | by Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press | News | Comments

The Riken Center for Development Biology in Kobe, Japan, has been looking into questions raised over images and wording in a research paper describing a simple way of turning ordinary cells from mice into stem cells. Riken said Tuesday that it may retract the paper because of credibility and ethics issues, even though an investigation is continuing.

Merck joins companies ending chimpanzee research

January 31, 2014 8:38 am | News | Comments

Drugmaker Merck & Co. is joining two dozen other pharmaceutical companies and contract laboratories in committing to not use chimpanzees for research. The growing trend could mean roughly 1,000 chimps in the U.S. used for research or warehoused for many years in laboratory cages could be "retired" to sanctuaries by around 2020.

Study: Biological donors should have access to own biobank data

January 24, 2014 11:54 am | News | Comments

Databanks containing information and biological materials from individuals are a crucial resource for research, but they are currently accessible only to researchers. In a recent paper published in Science, experts say that donors should have unrestricted access to data derived from their own material and that advanced technology means allowing such access is today a question of will rather than feasibility.

Advertisement

Silicon Valley sees shortage of EV charge stations

January 20, 2014 6:59 pm | News | Comments

Installation of electric vehicle charging ports at some companies has not kept pace with soaring demand, creating thorny etiquette issues in the workplace. The shortage has created incidents of "charge rage" among drivers, with vehicles being unplugged while charging. But adding chargers is expensive.

Friendly information signs reduce vandalism on scientific equipment

November 27, 2013 6:12 am | News | Comments

Damage to or theft of technical equipment represents a dramatic financial and scientific loss to researchers. Scientists in Germany decided to find out whether the information content and tone of labels attached to the equipment could reduce the incidence of vandalism. They found that a friendly, personal label reduced the interaction of people with the equipment in comparison with neutral or threatening labels.

Governments mining Google for more personal data

November 14, 2013 2:50 pm | News | Comments

Google has become less likely to comply with government demands for its users' online communications and other activities as authorities in the U.S. and other countries become more aggressive about mining the Internet for personal data. Legal requests from governments for people’s data have risen 21% from the last half of last year.

Study: Better police surveillance technologies come with a cost

November 11, 2013 2:07 pm | by Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor, Univ. of Illinois | News | Comments

The widespread use of advanced surveillance technologies by state and local police departments will improve the efficiency of criminal investigations. But a lack of oversight and regulation poses significant privacy concerns, warns Stephen Rushin, a professor of law at the Univ. of Illinois.

NIST, five journals find way to manage data errors in research

September 10, 2013 9:09 am | News | Comments

Poor research data can lead to mistakes in equipment selection, over-design of industrial plant components, difficulty simulating and discovering new processes, and poor regulatory decisions. However, traditional peer review is not enough to ensure data quality amid the recent boom in scientific research findings, according to results of a 10-year collaboration between NIST and five technical journals.

Advertisement

U.K. bars trash cans from tracking people with Wi-Fi

August 14, 2013 11:38 am | by Raphael Satter, Associated Press | News | Comments

Officials demanded Monday that an advertising firm stop using a network of high-tech trash cans to track people walking through London's financial district. The Renew ad firm has been using technology embedded in the hulking receptacles to measure the Wi-Fi signals emitted by smartphones, and suggested that it would apply the concept of "cookies"—tracking files that follow Internet users across the Web—to the physical world.

Experts say U.S. spy alliance will survive Snowden

July 16, 2013 9:34 am | by Nick Perry and Paisley Dodds, Associated Press | News | Comments

American information is so valuable, experts say, that no amount of global outrage over secret U.S. surveillance powers would cause Britain, Canada, Australia and New Zealand to ditch their collaborative spying arrangement: the Five Eyes. Revelations from NSA leaker Edward Snowden, they say, are unlikely to stop or even slow the global growth of secret-hunting—an increasingly critical factor in the security and prosperity of nations.

Men more likely than women to commit scientific fraud

January 22, 2013 8:58 am | News | Comments

It's not hard to see that men are more likely to engage in risky behaviors than women, or that crime rates are many times higher among men, but this tendency to break the rules also extends to male scientists, according to a recent study. The study did not examine why men are more likely to commit fraud, but the study’s author suggested one possibility is that misconduct is biologically driven

Article: New technology being stymied by copyright law

September 17, 2012 5:08 am | News | Comments

From Napster to iTunes to Pandora, the methods by which the public can obtain and share music have rapidly progressed. Future groundbreaking innovations may need to wait, though, as the next generation of technology is being stymied by the very copyright laws that seek to protect the industry, says Rutgers-Camden University professor Michael Carrier in a new article for a law journal..

Tech titans face off in court over iPhone, iPad

July 31, 2012 4:57 am | by Paul Elias, Associated Press | News | Comments

With billions of dollars and control of the U.S. smartphone and computer tablets markets at stake, jury selection began Monday in a closely watched trial between two of the world's leading tech companies over patents. Cupertino-based Apple is demanding $2.5 billion in damages from Samsung Electronics Co., an award that would dwarf the largest patent-related verdict to date.

“Control-Alt-Hack” game lets players try their hand at computer security

July 24, 2012 5:28 pm | by Hannah Hickey | News | Comments

Do you have what it takes to be an ethical hacker? Can you step into the shoes of a professional paid to outsmart supposedly locked-down systems? "Control-Alt-Hack", a new card game developed by University of Washington computer scientists, gives teenage and young-adult players a taste of what it means to be a computer-security professional defending against an ever-expanding range of digital threats.

University professors lead voluntary code of ethics effort for journals

June 6, 2012 9:44 am | News | Comments

Professors from Purdue University and the University of North Carolina at Charlotte are bringing editors of academic journals together to reaffirm their commitment to research integrity.

Cafe conquerors use high-tech gadgets to take over public spaces

May 9, 2012 5:59 am | News | Comments

It’s a situation we’ve all probably encountered: a coffee shop full of laptop users and no place to sit. According to recent studies at Boston College, “plugged-in” customers are increasingly grabbing extra seats counter space and table tops by using cell phones, laptops, and cups of steaming hot coffee to shield others from seemingly public spaces

Nanotechnology meets safety, ethics in medical community

April 30, 2012 3:50 am | News | Comments

Engineers are developing new and innovative ways of coating medical materials with nano-sized particles of silver, an element that has long been known for its antimicrobial properties. However, a recent paper from the University of Notre Dame highlights the fact that a vast majority of bacteria are actually neutral, or even beneficial. Overuse of nanosilver might harm their useful functions in daily life, the paper reports.

Gene mapping for everyone? Study says not so fast

April 2, 2012 3:46 pm | by Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press | News | Comments

Today, scientists map entire genomes mostly for research, but as genome mapping gets faster and cheaper, scientists and consumers have wondered about possible broader use: Would finding all the glitches hidden in your DNA predict which diseases you'll face decades later? Unfortunately, it’s not that simple, say experts.

High court throws out human gene patents

March 27, 2012 12:07 pm | News | Comments

The Supreme Court this week threw out a lower court ruling allowing human genes to be patented. The court overturned patents belonging to Myriad Genetics Inc. of Salt Lake City on two genes linked to increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer.

Protest exposes Silicon Valley-Hollywood rivalry

January 18, 2012 1:42 pm | News | Comments

Internet users quickly learned about the standoff between technology companies and Hollywood on Wednesday. Google blacked out its name, Reddit shut down for 12 hours, and Wikipedia blacked out its main site for the full day. At issue are two congressional proposals intended to limit online piracy of movies and TV programs.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading