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A New Paradigm for R&D Prioritization

August 28, 2014 10:36 am | White Papers

A new white paper from Decision Lens teaches how world-class innovation teams create standard frameworks to evaluate and prioritize the strategic investments that deliver the highest returns on investment, streamlining and accelerating the R&D portfolio planning process.  

Geography matters: Model predicts how local “shocks” influence U.S. economy

August 7, 2014 8:57 am | by B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs | News | Comments

A team of economists including Esteban Rossi-...

Joint Singapore-U.S. program to increase IC circuit designers globally

July 22, 2014 1:37 pm | News | Comments

North Carolina-based Semiconductor Research...

NSF, NIH collaborate to accelerate advance of biomedical innovations

June 19, 2014 8:39 am | News | Comments

A new collaboration between the National Science...

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Psychology researchers explore how engineers create

June 17, 2014 4:31 pm | News | Comments

Simply put, engineers make things. But is finding that “new” invention a massive mental leap from point A to point B, or are there scores of unnoticed intermediate steps in between? Researchers in Pittsburgh say that not enough has been done to understand how engineers create. Understanding the process, they propose, may provide a road map for speeding up innovation.

Research universities form technology consortium to share content

June 12, 2014 7:37 am | by Kim Broekuizen, Univ. of Michigan | News | Comments

Four major U.S. research universities have formed a technology consortium to improve the way in which educational content is shared across universities and ultimately delivered to students. Unizin will provide a common digital infrastructure that will allow member universities to work together to strengthen their traditional missions of education and research using the most innovative technology available today.

New teaching approach touted for engineering education

June 10, 2014 9:59 am | by Emil Venere, Purdue Univ. | News | Comments

Purdue Univ. researchers who developed a new approach to more effectively teach large numbers of engineering students are recommending that the approach be considered for adoption by universities globally. The system, called the Purdue Mechanics Freeform Classroom, allows students to interact with each other and faculty online while accessing hundreds of instructional videos and animations. It has been used for more than two years.

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New data say foreign graduate enrollment in S&E continues to rise

May 27, 2014 9:39 am | News | Comments

The number of citizens and permanent residents enrolled in S&E graduate programs in the United States declined in 2012, while the number of foreign students studying on temporary visas increased, according to new data from the National Science Foundation.

Synthetic biology still in uncharted waters of public opinion

May 15, 2014 12:36 pm | News | Comments

The Synthetic Biology Project at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is releasing the results of a new set of focus groups, which find continued low awareness of synthetic biology among the general public. The focus group results support the findings of a 2013 national poll that found just 23% of respondents reported they had heard a lot (6%) or some (17%) about synthetic biology.

Study: Creativity and innovation need to talk more

April 9, 2014 9:32 am | by Jeff Falk, Rice Univ. | News | Comments

Creativity and innovation are not sufficiently integrated in either the business world or academic research, according to a new study from several universities. The study proposes 60 specific research questions for future studies as well as 11 themes that warrant greater attention from researchers. They include the roles of customers, the Internet and social media and leadership style in the creativity-innovation cycle.

Conference to assess China’s international science, technology relations

March 31, 2014 3:08 pm | News | Comments

A first-of-its kind conference examining the role of China’s evolving international science and technology relationships will take place April 3-4 at Arizona State Univ.’s Tempe campus. The conference, called “The Evolving Role of Science and Technology in China’s International Relations,” hopes to enable a more thorough understanding of the multiple dimensions of China’s external science and technology collaborations.

R&D spending in higher education

March 21, 2014 10:04 am | News | Comments

The Higher Education Research and Development Survey, successor to the Survey of Research and Development Expenditures at Universities and Colleges, is the primary source of information on R&D expenditures at U.S. colleges and universities. The survey collects information on R&D expenditures by field of research and source of funds and also gathers information on types of research and expenses and headcounts of R&D personnel.

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Meet your match: Algorithms to spark scientific collaboration

February 21, 2014 10:33 am | News | Comments

Scientists in the U.K. have developed a novel approach to enabling collaborations between researchers at conferences and academic meetings: Treat them like genes. Using mathematical algorithms, the team created a method of matching conference-goers according to pre-set criteria, bringing about unforeseen collaboration opportunities while also enabling “would-like-to-meet” match-ups across disciplines and knowledge areas.

Study: Copycats pave the way to problem-solving success

January 15, 2014 9:07 am | News | Comments

It is often better to be surrounded by copycats than innovators, according to a new Indiana Univ. study that created a virtual problem landscape to explore the advantages and disadvantages of “social learning”. The researchers thought at first it would be better to have innovators around, but in their experiments imitators offered the greater benefit.

Smithsonian, Olympus team up on new science education effort

December 10, 2013 10:47 am | News | Comments

Q?rius (pronounced “Curious”) is a new hub of scientific activity and education based at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington D.C. The product of a partnership between Olympus and the Smithsonian, the 10,000-square-foot experiential learning center will be equipped with dozens of microscopes and imaging systems that will enable museum visitors more than 6,000 bones, minerals, and fossils.

Mission possible: Simulation-based training and experimentation on display

December 3, 2013 7:53 am | by Eric Beidel, Office of Naval Research | News | Comments

The Office of Naval Research is demonstrating the Fleet Integrated Synthetic Training/Testing Facility (FIST2FAC) in Florida this week, showing how gaming technology is helping naval forces develop operations strategies in a hassle-free way.

Friendly information signs reduce vandalism on scientific equipment

November 27, 2013 6:12 am | News | Comments

Damage to or theft of technical equipment represents a dramatic financial and scientific loss to researchers. Scientists in Germany decided to find out whether the information content and tone of labels attached to the equipment could reduce the incidence of vandalism. They found that a friendly, personal label reduced the interaction of people with the equipment in comparison with neutral or threatening labels.

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Thermo Fisher Scientific announces STEM scholarship program

August 27, 2013 3:05 pm | News | Comments

This week, Thermo Fisher Scientific announced that it would allocate nearly $700,000 per year to support science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) scholarships at some of the world’s most prestigious universities. The company has established a competitive program to provide financial assistance to students who are pursuing an undergraduate degree or equivalent in a STEM field.

Thermo Fisher significantly expands R&D capabilities in China

June 27, 2013 8:12 am | News | Comments

This week, Thermo Fisher Scientific unveiled plans to greatly expand its reach into high-growth markets in the Asia-Pacific region. It has invested $9.5 million in a new China Innovation Center and is expecting to add 200 to 300 engineers in the next two to three years, as well as a training center to instruct up to 2,500 customers per year.

Entrepreneurs need to balance risk of persisting with payoff of succeeding

May 20, 2013 8:35 pm | News | Comments

In a new business, sometimes the better part of wisdom is knowing when to quit, a new study concludes. Even though persistence is a key to business success, entrepreneurs might be more successful if they not only knew when to start a business and take risks, but also knew when to abandon it and find something that provides a greater opportunity, the research team concluded.

Alan Alda wants scientists to cut out the jargon

May 1, 2013 9:12 am | by Frank Eltman, Associated Press | News | Comments

Among the procedures Army surgeon Hawkeye Pierce performed on "M.A.S.H." was an end-to-end anastomosis. Most of the viewers, actor Alan Alda concedes, had no idea he was talking about removing a damaged piece of intestine and reconnecting the healthy pieces. Today, the award-winning film and television star is on a mission to teach scientists of all types to ditch the jargon and get their points across in clear, simple language.

Computer scientists use music to lure students to STEM majors

March 8, 2013 10:27 am | News | Comments

In effort to show students the opportunities available in science-based career paths, Jennifer Burg and her colleagues at Wake Forest University decided to use music projects to help students in lower-level classes latch onto highly technical concepts in digital media. Making music is the main objective, but Burg’s ultimate goal is to get them to understand how the underlying technology works—and to love it so much they decide on a STEM career.

Report highlights latest data on women, minorities in science, engineering

March 7, 2013 10:36 am | News | Comments

Women, persons with disabilities and three racial and ethnic groups—African Americans, Hispanics and American Indians—continue to be underrepresented in science and engineering (S&E) according to a new report released by the National Science Foundation. Data in the report demonstrate that women earn a smaller proportion of degrees in many S&E fields of study, although their participation has risen during the last 20 years in most S&E fields.

IBM, NY to create new technical education programs

February 26, 2013 3:22 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

IBM and New York are teaming up to create 10 new technical education programs, one each at public schools in different regions of the state. Gov. Andrew Cuomo and IBM say Tuesday the goal is to train students for skilled jobs in technology, manufacturing, health care, and finance to support economic growth and development.

Academic institutions added more science, engineering R&D in last few years

February 5, 2013 7:51 am | News | Comments

Science and engineering research space at the nation's research-performing colleges and universities increased 3.5% from fiscal year (FY) 2009 to FY 2011, growing to 202.9 million net assignable square feet (NASF), according to recent data from the National Science Foundation's Survey of Science and Engineering Research Facilities. Biomedical fields account for the majority of the growth.

UW, PNNL tackle big data with joint computing institute

January 10, 2013 7:43 am | News | Comments

The deluge of data coming from today's countless electronic devices will be harnessed to take on the most pressing problems facing science and society at a new computational institute in Seattle. The Northwest Institute for Advanced Computing is being formed by the University of Washington and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Truchard contributes $10M to UT engineering school

January 4, 2013 1:00 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The co-founder, president and CEO of National Instruments Corp. has contributed $10 million to the University of Texas Cockrell School of Engineering to help fund a new teaching laboratory. UT on Friday announced the donation from James Truchard. School officials in Austin say Truchard's gift is the largest personal donation so far toward the $310 million National Instruments Student Project Center.

Alan Alda asks scientists to explain: What's time?

December 11, 2012 8:38 am | by Frank Eltman, Associated Press | News | Comments

Professor and actor Alan Alda has a homework assignment for scientists: Explain the following question in terms a sixth-grader could understand: "What is time?" Alda, a visiting professor at New York’s Stony Brook University school of journalism, has made the assignment an international contest to focus attention on the need to better communicate science principles and eliminate misinformation about science.

Characteristics of U.S. science, engineering doctorates detailed in report

December 10, 2012 12:32 pm | News | Comments

The National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (NCSES) released a report titled Doctorate Recipients from U.S. Universities: 2010 that unveils important trends in U.S. doctoral education. The report calls attention to the changing characteristics of U.S. doctorate recipients over time.

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