Advertisement
Superconductors
Subscribe to Superconductors

The Lead

Professor Jim Williams (L), Professor Andrei Rode and Associate Professor Jodie Bradby with the electron diffraction pattern of one of their new silicon phases. Courtesy of Stuart Hay, ANU

Making new materials with micro-explosions

June 30, 2015 10:49 am | by Australian National University | News | Comments

Scientists have made exotic new materials by creating laser-induced micro-explosions in silicon, the common computer chip material. The new technique could lead to the simple creation and manufacture of superconductors or high-efficiency solar cells and light sensors. By focusing lasers onto silicon buried under a clear layer of silicon dioxide, the group has perfected a way to reliably blast tiny cavities in the solid silicon.

Discovery paves way for new superconducting electronics

June 22, 2015 12:15 pm | by Kim McDonald, Univ. of California, San Diego | News | Comments

Physicists have developed a new way to control the transport of electrical currents through high...

Researchers predicted existence of new quantum matter theoretically

June 17, 2015 12:00 pm | by Aalto Univ. | News | Comments

Aalto Univ. researchers have succeeded to predict, in theory, that superconducting surfaces can...

Physicists map electron structure of superconductivity’s ‘doppelgänger’

June 3, 2015 11:08 am | by University of British Columbia | News | Comments

Physicists have painted an in-depth portrait of charge ordering—an electron self-organization...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Linking superconductivity and structure

May 27, 2015 7:31 am | by Carnegie Institution | News | Comments

Superconductivity is a rare physical state in which matter is able to conduct electricity without any resistance. It can only be found in certain materials, and even then it can only be achieved under controlled conditions of low temperatures and high pressures. New research from the Carnegie Institution hones in on the structural changes underlying superconductivity in iron arsenide compounds.

Discovered: “Swing-dancing” pair of electrons

May 13, 2015 4:45 pm | by Joe Miksch, Univ. of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

A research team led by the Univ. of Pittsburgh’s Jeremy Levy has discovered electrons that can “swing dance.” This unique electronic behavior can potentially lead to new families of quantum devices. Superconductors form the basis for magnetic resonance imaging devices as well as emerging technologies such as quantum computers. At the heart of all superconductors is the bunching of electrons into pairs.

SCU15 is a unique superconducting undulator for production of high-brilliance x-rays installed in the ANKA storage ring. Courtesy of KIT/ANKA/BNG

Novel superconducting undulator provides first X-ray light at ANKA

April 30, 2015 12:16 pm | by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Synchrotron radiation facilities provide insights into the world of very small structures like microbes, viruses or nanomaterials and rely on dedicated magnet technology, which is optimized to produce highest intensity beams. The ANKA synchrotron radiation facility at KIT and Babcock Noell GmbH now took a technological leap forward: They have successfully developed, installed, and tested a novel full-length superconducting undulator.

Advertisement

Heat makes electrons spin in magnetic superconductors

April 28, 2015 10:31 am | by Academy of Finland | News | Comments

Physicists have shown how heat can be used to control the magnetic properties of matter. The finding helps in the development of more efficient mass memories. In the study, the researchers showed how heat is converted into a spin current in magnetic superconductors. Magnetic superconductors can be fabricated by placing a superconducting film on top of a magnetic insulator.

When mediated by superconductivity, light pushes matter million times more

April 28, 2015 10:24 am | by University of Jyväskylä | News | Comments

When a mirror reflects light, it experiences a slight push. This radiation pressure can be increased considerably with the help of a small superconducting island. The finding paves a way for the studies of mechanical oscillations at the level of a single photon, the quantum of light.

Negative electronic compressibility: More is less in novel material

April 27, 2015 2:19 pm | by Boston College | News | Comments

Add water to a half-filled cup and the water level rises. This everyday experience reflects a positive material property of the water-cup system. But what if adding more water lowers the water level by deforming the cup? This would mean a negative compressibility. Now, a quantum version of this phenomenon, called negative electronic compressibility (NEC), has been discovered.

Heat makes electrons’ spin in magnetic superconductors

April 24, 2015 9:53 am | by Academy of Finland | News | Comments

Physicists have shown how heat can be exploited for controlling magnetic properties of matter. The finding helps in the development of more efficient mass memories. The result was published in Physical Review Letters. The international research group behind the breakthrough included Finnish researchers from the University of Jyväskylä and Aalto Univ.

How to maximize the superconducting critical temperature in a molecular superconductor

April 20, 2015 12:38 pm | by Tohoku Univ. | News | Comments

A research team has investigated the electronic properties of the family of unconventional superconductors based on fullerenes, which have the highest known superconducting critical temperature among molecular superconductors, and was able to demonstrate the guiding influence of the molecular electronic structure in controlling superconductivity and achieving maximum Tc.

Advertisement

Unraveling the origin of the pseudogap in a charge density wave compound

April 8, 2015 2:53 pm | by Argonne National Laboratory | News | Comments

The pseudogap, a state characterized by a partial gap and loss of coherence in the electronic excitations, has been associated with many unusual physical phenomena in a variety of materials ranging from cold atoms to colossal magnetoresistant manganese oxides to high temperature copper oxide superconductors. Its nature, however, remains controversial due to the complexity of these materials and the difficulties in studying them.

A potential Rosetta Stone of high-temperature superconductivity

April 8, 2015 1:36 pm | by U.S. Department of Energy | News | Comments

High purity single crystals of superconducting material (CeCoIn5) with the highest observed superconducting temperature for a cerium-based material enabled investigation of the relationship among magnetism, superconductivity and disorder by strategic substitution of certain atoms with others (dopants) in the superconductor.

Using magnetic fields to understand high-temperature superconductivity

March 27, 2015 7:44 am | by Nancy Ambrosiano, Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

Taking our understanding of quantum matter to new levels, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are exposing high-temperature superconductors to very high magnetic fields, changing the temperature at which the materials become perfectly conducting and revealing unique properties of these substances.

Watching quantum dots “breathe” in response to stress

March 19, 2015 8:44 am | by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory watched nanoscale semiconductor crystals expand and shrink in response to powerful pulses of laser light. This ultrafast “breathing” provides new insight about how such tiny structures change shape as they start to melt: information that can help guide researchers in tailoring their use for a range of applications.

New way to measure superconducting fluctuations

March 13, 2015 8:27 am | by Louise Lerner, Argonne National Laboratory | News | Comments

A study published by researchers at Argonne National Laboratory provides theoretical evidence for a new effect that may lead to a way of measuring the exact temperature at which superconductivity kicks in and shed light on the poorly understood properties of superconducting materials above this temperature.

Advertisement

Researchers snap-shot fastest observations of superconductivity yet

March 11, 2015 7:51 am | by Chris Balma, Univ. of British Columbia | News | Comments

An international team of researchers has used infinitely short light pulses to observe ultrafast changes in the electron-level properties of superconductors, setting a new standard for temporal resolution in the field. The scientists liken the new technique to the development of high-speed film capture in the early days of photography.

Simulating superconducting materials with ultracold atoms

February 23, 2015 11:46 am | by Jade Boyd, Rice Univ. | News | Comments

Using ultracold atoms as a stand-in for electrons, a Rice Univ.-based team of physicists has simulated superconducting materials and made headway on a problem that's vexed physicists for nearly three decades. The research was carried out by an international team of experimental and theoretical physicists and appears online in Nature. The work could open up a new realm of unexplored science.

Cesium atoms shaken, not stirred, to create elusive excitation in superfluid

February 6, 2015 8:04 am | by Steve Koppes, The Univ. of Chicago | News | Comments

Scientists discovered in 1937 that liquid helium-4, when chilled to extremely low temperatures, became a superfluid that could leak through glass, overflow its containers or eternally gush like a fountain. Future Nobel laureate Lev Landau came along in 1941, predicting that superfluid helium-4 should contain an exotic, particle-like excitation called a roton.

Hybrid memory device for superconducting computing

January 26, 2015 12:20 pm | by NIST | News | Comments

Scientists have demonstrated a nanoscale memory technology for superconducting computing that could hasten the advent of an urgently awaited, low-energy alternative to power-hungry conventional data centers and supercomputers. In recent years, the stupendous and growing data demands of cloud computing, expanded Internet use, mobile device support and other applications have prompted the creation of large, centralized computing facilities.

Novel superconducting hybrid crystals developed

January 12, 2015 11:39 am | by Gertie Skaarup, Niels Bohr Institute | News | Comments

A new type of nanowire crystals that fuses semiconducting and metallic materials on the atomic scale could lay the foundation for future semiconducting electronics. Researchers at the Univ. of Copenhagen are behind the breakthrough, which has great potential. The development and quality of extremely small electronic circuits are critical to how and how well future computers and other electronic devices will function.

High-temperature superconductor “fingerprint” found

January 7, 2015 8:06 am | by Anne Ju, Cornell Univ. | News | Comments

Theorists and experimentalists working together at Cornell Univ. may have found the answer to a major challenge in condensed matter physics: identifying the smoking gun of why “unconventional” superconductivity occurs, they report in Nature Physics.

New law for superconductors

December 16, 2014 2:47 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have discovered a new mathematical relationship—between material thickness, temperature and electrical resistance—that appears to hold in all superconductors. The result could shed light on the nature of superconductivity and could also lead to better-engineered superconducting circuits for applications like quantum computing and ultra-low-power computing.

Rattled atoms mimic high-temperature superconductivity

December 8, 2014 9:29 am | by SLAC Office of Communications | News | Comments

An experiment at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory provided the first fleeting glimpse of the atomic structure of a material as it entered a state resembling room-temperature superconductivity—a long-sought phenomenon in which materials might conduct electricity with 100% efficiency under everyday conditions.

Unusual electronic state found in new class of superconductors

December 8, 2014 7:41 am | by Karen McNulty Walsh, Brookhaven National Laboratory | News | Comments

A team of scientists has discovered an unusual form of electronic order in a new family of unconventional superconductors. The findingestablishes an unexpected connection between this new group of titanium-oxypnictide superconductors and the more familiar cuprates and iron-pnictides, providing scientists with a whole new family of materials from which they can gain deeper insights into the mysteries of high-temperature superconductivity.

Study explains atomic action in high-temperature superconductors

November 13, 2014 7:43 am | by Andrew Gordon, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory | News | Comments

A study at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory suggests for the first time how scientists might deliberately engineer superconductors that work at higher temperatures. In their report, a team of researchers explains why a thin layer of iron selenide superconducts at much higher temperatures when placed atop another material, which is called STO for its main ingredients strontium, titanium and oxygen. 

Computational model predicts superconductivity

November 1, 2014 11:34 am | by Katie Elyce Jones, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers studying iron-based superconductors are combining novel electronic structure algorithms with the high-performance computing power of the U.S. Dept. of Energy’s Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to predict spin dynamics, or the ways electrons orient and correlate their spins in a material.

New evidence for exotic, predicted superconducting state

October 27, 2014 12:35 pm | News | Comments

A research team led by a Brown Univ. physicist has produced new evidence for an exotic superconducting state, first predicted a half-century ago, that can arise when a superconductor is exposed to a strong magnetic field. This new understanding of what happens when electron spin populations become unequal could have implications beyond superconductivity.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading