Advertisement
Sensors
Subscribe to Sensors

The Lead

Tiny laser sensor heightens bomb detection sensitivity

July 21, 2014 7:45 am | by Sarah Yang, Media Relations, UC Berkeley | News | Comments

New technology under development at the Univ. of California, Berkeley could soon give bomb-sniffing dogs some serious competition. A team of researchers has found a way to dramatically increase the sensitivity of a light-based plasmon sensor to detect incredibly minute concentrations of explosives.

“Sensing skin” quickly detects cracks, damage in concrete structures

June 23, 2014 8:10 am | by Matt Shipman, News Services, North Carolina State Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State Univ. and the Univ. of Eastern Finland have developed new...

Tiny laser-powered sensor-on-a-chip tests chemical composition of liquids

June 11, 2014 7:51 am | News | Comments

Simple solid-state lasers consist of only one material. But quantum cascade lasers are...

PerkinElmer launches new real-time air quality sensor network

June 10, 2014 7:52 am | News | Comments

PerkinElmer, Inc., has announced the launch of Elm...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Photonics experts build world's most sensitive thermometer

June 5, 2014 7:51 am | by Jack Baldwin, The Lead | News | Comments

Researchers at the Univ. of Adelaide in South Australia have created a thermometer three times more precise than any existing device, able to measure temperature to 30 billionths of a degree. Using the phenomenon called a “whispering gallery”, which projects sounds, the scientists have designed a crystalline disk that concentrates and reinforces light, allowing them to track a minute difference in speed between red light and green light.

Detecting trace amounts of explosives with light

May 8, 2014 11:12 am | News | Comments

Research in Australia may help in the fight against terrorism with the creation of a sensor that can detect tiny quantities of explosives with the use of light and special glass fibers. The researchers have created a new optical fiber sensor which can detect explosives in concentrations as low as 6.3 ppm (parts per million). It requires an analysis time of only a few minutes.

Self-healing smart beads detect and repair corrosion

May 2, 2014 2:41 pm | News | Comments

Scientists at Battelle have developed a tiny bead that not only detects corrosion but delivers a payload to help heal the microscopic cracks that rust creates. Called the Battelle Smart Corrosion Detector, the beads look like a fine, whitish powder that can be mixed with coatings used to protect pipelines and other critical infrastructure subject to corrosion. Self-activating, they release a proprietary chemical that fills cracks.

Advertisement

Flexible pressure-sensor film shows how much force a surface “feels”

April 30, 2014 11:43 am | News | Comments

A newly developed pressure sensor could help car manufacturers design safer automobiles and even help Little League players hold their bats with a better grip, scientists report. The study describing their high-resolution sensor, which can be painted onto surfaces or built into gloves, appears in Nano Letters.

Label-free, sequence-specific, inexpensive fluorescent DNA sensors

April 28, 2014 8:03 am | by Karen McNulty Walsh, Brookhaven National Laboratory | News | Comments

Using principles of energy transfer more commonly applied to designing solar cells, scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a new highly sensitive way to detect specific sequences of DNA, the genetic material unique to every living thing. The method is considerably less costly than other DNA assays and has widespread potential for applications in forensics, medical diagnostics and the detection of bioterror agents.

Nanoreporters tell ‘sour’ oil from ‘sweet’

April 21, 2014 8:38 am | by Mike Williams, Rice Univ. | News | Comments

Scientists at Rice Univ. have created a nanoscale detector that checks for and reports on the presence of hydrogen sulfide in crude oil and natural gas while they’re still in the ground. The nanoreporter is based on nanometer-sized carbon material developed by a consortium of Rice labs led by chemist James Tour, R&D’s 2013 Scientist of the Year.  

Hybrid technology could make Star Trek-style tricorder a reality

April 8, 2014 11:29 am | News | Comments

In the fictional Star-Trek universe, the tricorder was used to remotely scan patients for a diagnosis. A new device under development in the U.K. could perform that function through the use of chemical sensors on printed circuit boards. This would replace the current conventional diagnostic method, which is lengthy and is limited to single point measurements.

Tiny, wireless sensing device remotely alerts users to tell-tale vapors

April 4, 2014 2:52 pm | News | Comments

A research team has developed a small electronic sensing device that can alert users wirelessly to the presence of chemical vapors in the atmosphere.                              

Advertisement

Researchers change coercivity of material by patterning surfaces

March 17, 2014 9:29 am | by Matt Shipman, News Services, North Carolina State Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State Univ. have found a way to reduce the coercivity of nickel-ferrite (NFO) thin films by as much as 80% by patterning the surface of the material, opening the door to more energy efficient high-frequency electronics, such as sensors, microwave devices and antennas.

The end of full-body scanners?

February 26, 2014 11:04 am | News | Comments

Standing in a full-body scanner at an airport isn’t fun, and the process adds time and stress to a journey. It also raises privacy concerns. But researchers now report making several key advances in terahertz wave sensor technology to create a more precise and direct method for using these waves to detect explosives from greater distances.

Artificial hand feels what you touch

February 6, 2014 12:23 pm | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

It's not quite the bionics of science fiction, but European researchers have created a robotic hand that gave an amputee a sense of touch he hadn't felt in a decade. The experiment lasted only a week, but it let the patient feel if different objects were hard or soft, slim or round, and intuitively adjust his grasp.

Vanadium dioxide research opens door to spintronic smart sensors

February 5, 2014 8:12 am | News | Comments

Research from a team led by North Carolina State Univ. is opening the door to smarter sensors by integrating the smart material vanadium dioxide onto a silicon chip and using lasers to make the material magnetic. The advance paves the way for multifunctional spintronic smart sensors for use in military applications and next-generation spintronic devices.

Weight loss program for infrared cameras

February 3, 2014 8:56 am | News | Comments

Infrared sensors can be employed in a wide range of applications, such as driver assistance systems for vehicles or thermography for buildings. However, IR detectors need to be permanently cooled, resulting in cameras that are large, heavy and energy-intensive. Researchers are now developing IR sensors for the far-infrared region that can operate at room temperature and a new prototype camera is providing a test bed for development.

Advertisement

Researchers develop new method to control nanoscale diamond sensors

January 24, 2014 7:59 am | by Helen Knight, MIT News correspondent | News | Comments

Diamonds may be a girl’s best friend, but they could also one day help us understand how the brain processes information, thanks to a new sensing technique developed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). A team in MIT’s Quantum Engineering Group has developed a new method to control nanoscale diamond sensors, which are capable of measuring even very weak magnetic fields.

Turkeys inspire smartphone-capable early warning system for toxins

January 21, 2014 11:46 am | by Sarah Yang, UC Berkeley | News | Comments

Some may think of turkeys as good for just lunch meat and holiday meals, but bioengineers at the Univ. of California (UC), Berkeley saw inspiration in the big birds for a new type of biosensor that changes color when exposed to chemical vapors. This feature makes the sensors valuable detectors of toxins or airborne pathogens.

E-whiskers: Researchers develop highly sensitive tactile sensors for robotics

January 21, 2014 11:25 am | News | Comments

Researchers in California have created tactile sensors from composite films of carbon nanotubes and silver nanoparticles similar to the highly sensitive whiskers of cats and rats. These new e-whiskers respond to pressure as slight as a single Pascal, about the pressure exerted on a table surface by a dollar bill.

Pushing the thermal limits of nanoscale SQUIDs

January 20, 2014 6:41 pm | News | Comments

Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are incredibly sensitive magnetic flux sensors which have been limited in their applications because of thermal challenges at ultralow temperatures. Researchers in the U.K. have succeeded in overcoming this difficulty by introducing a new type of nanoscale SQUID based on optimized proximity effect bilayers.

New device prevents falls in the elderly

January 17, 2014 12:26 pm | News | Comments

Falls are a major problem for the elderly. Each year, one-third of adults over age 65 experience a fall, and one-third of those falls impact health and autonomy. The Swiss spin-off Gait Up just put an extremely thin motion sensor on the market which can detect the risk of a fall in an older person and is equally useful for sports and physical therapy.

High-temperature sensor technologies to increase power plant efficiency

January 7, 2014 9:27 am | News | Comments

The sensors team at the National Energy Technology Laboratory is working on sensor technologies to enable embedded gas sensing at high temperature. Through a combination of theoretical simulations and experiments, the team has demonstrated that transparent conducting oxides such as aluminum-doped zinc oxide show significant promise for high-temperature optical gas sensing in the near‑infrared wavelength range.

Dim traffic sensors dull how “smart” freeways are

November 25, 2013 8:46 am | by Justin Pritchard, Associated Press | News | Comments

Buried under thousands of miles of pavement in California are 27,000 traffic sensors that are supposed to help troubleshoot both daily commutes and long-term maintenance needs on some of the nation's most heavily used and congested roadways. About 9,000 of them do not work, despite their critical role in an "intelligent transportation" system designed to do things like detect the congestion that quickly builds after an accident.

A bio patch that can regrow bone

November 7, 2013 12:06 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of Iowa have created a bio patch to regenerate missing or damaged bone by putting DNA into a nano-sized particle that delivers bone-producing instructions directly into cells. The bone-regeneration kit relies on a collagen platform seeded with particles containing the genes needed for producing bone. 

New atomic clock design uses cold atoms to boost precision

November 6, 2013 11:21 am | News | Comments

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a compact atomic clock design that relies on cold rubidium atoms instead of the usual hot atoms, a switch that promises improved precision and stability.

Implantable sensor paves way to long-term monitoring

November 4, 2013 7:31 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the most important signaling molecules in living cells, carrying messages within the brain and coordinating immune system functions. In many cancerous cells, levels are perturbed, but very little is known about how NO behaves in both healthy and cancerous cells. Until now.

Project aims to mass-produce nanopetals for sensor, batteries

October 22, 2013 8:28 am | News | Comments

Researchers at Purdue Univ. are developing a method to mass-produce a new type of nanomaterial for advanced sensors and batteries, with an eye toward manufacturing in the Midwest. Research findings indicate the material shows promise as a sensor for detecting glucose in the saliva or tears and for "supercapacitors" that could make possible fast-charging, high-performance batteries.

New multi-touch sensor is customizable with scissors

October 15, 2013 2:37 pm | News | Comments

People often customize the size and shape of materials like textiles and wood without turning to specialists like tailors or carpenters. In the future this should be possible with electronics, according to computer scientists who have developed a printable multi-touch sensor whose shape and size can be altered by anybody.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading