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Researchers develop sticky nanoparticles to fight heart disease

February 18, 2014 10:51 am | News | Comments

Clemson Univ. researchers have developed nanoparticles that can deliver drugs targeting damaged arteries, a non-invasive method to fight heart disease. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One of the standard ways to treat clogged and damaged arteries currently is to implant vascular stents, which hold the vessels open and release such drugs as paclitaxel.

Pomegranate-inspired design solves problems for lithium-ion batteries

February 18, 2014 8:46 am | News | Comments

An electrode designed like a pomegranate—with silicon nanoparticles clustered like seeds in a tough carbon rind—overcomes several remaining obstacles to using silicon for a new generation of lithium-ion batteries, say its inventors at Stanford Univ. and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Caps not the culprit in nanotube chirality

February 18, 2014 8:14 am | News | Comments

A single-walled carbon nanotube grows from the round cap down, so it’s logical to think the cap’s formation determines what follows. But according to researchers at Rice Univ., that’s not entirely so. Theoretical physicist Boris Yakobson and his Rice colleagues found through exhaustive analysis that those who wish to control the chirality of nanotubes would be wise to look at other aspects of their growth.

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Rice’s carbon nanotube fibers outperform copper

February 14, 2014 7:22 am | Videos | Comments

On a pound-per-pound basis, carbon nanotube-based fibers invented at Rice Univ. have greater capacity to carry electrical current than copper cables of the same mass, according to new research. While individual nanotubes are capable of transmitting nearly 1,000 times more current than copper, the same tubes coalesced into a fiber using other technologies fail long before reaching that capacity.

Researchers develop first single-molecule LED

February 13, 2014 9:42 am | News | Comments

A team in France has greatly miniaturized the light-emitting diode (LED) by creating one from a single polythiophene wire placed between the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and a gold surface. This nanowire, which is made of the same hydrogen, carbon and sulfur components found in much larger LEDs, emits light only when the current passes in a certain direction.

New technology reconstructs smallest features of human fingerprints

February 12, 2014 8:42 am | News | Comments

An international partnerships is aiming to develop robust fingerprint sensors with resolution beyond today’s 500 dpi international standards, the minimum required by the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation. The new platform uses vertical piezoelectric nanowire matrices designed using multiphysics modeling software.

How to make the wonder material graphene superconducting

February 11, 2014 1:42 pm | News | Comments

An international team has recently unveiled a superconducting pairing mechanism in calcium-doped graphene. The pairing, which was using a angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy method, is important because graphene is easily doped or functionalized with chemicals, allowing scientists to more fully explore the nature of superconductivity.

Fine-tuning a rainbow of colors at the nanoscale

February 11, 2014 1:34 pm | News | Comments

Engineers are increasingly turning to plasmonic color filters (PCFs) to create and control a broad spectrum of colors for imaging applications. However, PCF light transmission efficiency has been limited to only about 30%, less than half the rate of conventional filters. Researchers have now developed a new PCF scheme that achieves a transmission efficiency of 60 to 70%.

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Better RNA interference, inspired by nature

February 11, 2014 7:54 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Inspired by tiny particles that carry cholesterol through the body, Massachusetts Institute of Technology chemical engineers have designed nanoparticles that can deliver snippets of genetic material that turn off disease-causing genes. This approach, known as RNA interference, holds great promise for treating cancer and other diseases. However, delivering enough RNA to treat the diseased tissue has proven difficult.

Researchers make breakthrough in battery technology

February 10, 2014 1:09 pm | News | Comments

Materials experts in Ireland have developed a new germanium nanowire-based anode that has the ability to greatly increase the capacity and lifetimes of lithium-ion batteries. The typical lithium-ion battery on the market today is based on graphite, which has a relatively low capacity for energy storage. Restructuring the germanium replacement material into nanowires produces a stable, porous battery material.

Molecular traffic jam makes water move faster through nanochannels

February 6, 2014 12:40 pm | News | Comments

Cars inch forward slowly in traffic jams, but molecules, when jammed up, can move extremely fast. New research by Northwestern Univ. researchers finds that water molecules traveling through tiny carbon nanotube pipes do not flow continuously but rather intermittently, like stop-and-go traffic, with unexpected results.

Finding: Graphene ribbons are highly conductive at room temperature

February 6, 2014 12:40 pm | News | Comments

An international team of researchers from France and the United States have devised an entirely new way to synthesize graphene ribbons with defined, regular edges, allowing electrons to flow freely through the material. Demonstrating this phenomenon at room temperature, the material was shown to permit electron flow up to 200 times faster than through silicon.

Researchers find unambiguous evidence for coherent phonons in superlattices

February 6, 2014 8:39 am | by Lynn Yarris, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

We all learn in high school science about the dual nature of light—that it exists as both waves and quantum particles called photons. It’s this duality of light that enables the coherent transport of photons in lasers. Sound at the atomic-scale has the same dual nature, existing as both waves and quasi-particles known as phonons. Does this duality allow for phonon-based lasers?

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Ballistic transport in graphene suggests new type of electronic device

February 6, 2014 8:20 am | by John Toon, Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Using electrons more like photons could provide the foundation for a new type of electronic device that would capitalize on the ability of graphene to carry electrons with almost no resistance even at room temperature—a property known as ballistic transport. Research reported that electrical resistance in nanoribbons of epitaxial graphene changes in discrete steps following quantum mechanical principles.

Scientists produce first ever atom-by-atom simulation of ALD nanoscale film growth

February 5, 2014 1:18 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at Tyndall National Institute in Ireland have produced the first ever atom-by-atom simulation of nanoscale film growth by atomic layer deposition (ALD), a thin-film technology used in the production of silicon chips. The accomplishment required the acquisition of the complete set of hundreds of ALD reactions at the quantum mechanical level.

Testing nanomedicine with blood cells on a microchip

February 4, 2014 11:51 am | by Brett Israel, Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Designing nanomedicine to combat diseases is a hot area of scientific research, primarily for treating cancer, but very little is known in the context of atherosclerotic disease. Scientists have engineered a microchip coated with blood vessel cells to learn more about the conditions under which nanoparticles accumulate in the plaque-filled arteries of patients with atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of myocardial infarction and stroke.

Quasi-particle swap between graphene layers

February 4, 2014 9:02 am | News | Comments

Scientists have used a particle physics theory to describe the behavior of particle-like entities, referred to as excitons, in two layers of graphene. The use of equations typically employed in high-energy physics has prompted the authors to suggest a design for an experimental device relying on a magnetically tunable optical filter that could verify their predictions.

Diamond film possible without the pressure

February 4, 2014 8:59 am | News | Comments

Perfect sheets of diamond a few atoms thick appear to be possible even without the big squeeze that makes natural gems. Scientists have speculated about it and a few laboratories have even seen signs of what they call diamane, an extremely thin film of diamond that has all of diamond’s superior semiconducting and thermal properties.

Technique grows tiny “hairy” materials at the microscale

February 3, 2014 8:16 am | News | Comments

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory attacked a tangled problem by developing a new technique to grow tiny “hairy” materials that assemble themselves at the microscale. The key ingredient is epoxy, which is added to a mixture of hardener and solvent inside an electric cell. Then the scientists run an alternating current through the cell and watch long, twisting fibers spring up. It looks like the way Chia pets grow in commercials.

Growing a business, from the lab

February 3, 2014 7:45 am | by Rob Matheson, MIT News Office | News | Comments

In the early 1990s, MIT researcher Shuguang Zhang, then an MIT postdoctoral researcher, stumbled upon peptides that could self-assemble into nanostructures, creating 3-D environments for cell culturing. It was, at the time, a breakthrough discovery. But it wouldn’t be until a decade later, in a last-ditch effort to bring this discovery to the public, that these peptides would find commercial application through 3-D Matrix.

Rice lab clocks “hot” electrons

January 31, 2014 7:48 am | News | Comments

Plasmonic nanoparticles developed at Rice Univ. are becoming known for their ability to turn light into heat, but how to use them to generate electricity is not nearly as well understood. Scientists at Rice are working on that, too. They suggest that the extraction of electrons generated by surface plasmons in metal nanoparticles may be optimized and have measured the time plasmon-generated electrons take moving from nanorods to graphene.

Researchers take magnetic waves for a spin

January 30, 2014 8:23 am | News | Comments

Researchers at New York Univ. have developed a method for creating and directing fast moving waves in magnetic fields that have the potential to enhance communication and information processing in computer chips and other consumer products. Their method employs spin waves, which are waves that move in magnetic materials.

Identifying chemical, physical traits of fallout

January 30, 2014 7:55 am | by Anne M. Stark, Lawrence Livermore National Laboraotry | News | Comments

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have begun to develop a technique that provides a practical approach for looking into the complex physical and chemical processes that occur during fallout formation following a nuclear detonation. Post-detonation nuclear forensics relies on advanced analytical techniques and an understanding of the physio-chemical processes associated with a nuclear detonation to identify the device type.

Navy researchers create new type of graphene transport device

January 29, 2014 10:12 am | News | Comments

Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have created a new type of tunnel device structure in which the tunnel barrier and transport channel are made of the same material, graphene. Their work shows the highest spin injection values yet measured for graphene, opening an entirely new avenue for making highly functional, scalable graphene-based electronic and spintronic devices a reality.

Lungs may suffer when certain elements go nano

January 28, 2014 11:40 am | by Linda Fulps, Missouri Science & Technology | News | Comments

More than 2,800 commercially available applications are now based on nanoparticles, but this influx of nanotechnology is not without risks, say researchers at Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology. They have been systematically studying the effects of transition metal oxide nanoparticles on human lung cells and have found that the nanoparticles’ toxicity to the cells increased as they moved right on the periodic table.

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