Advertisement
Manufacturing Technologies
Subscribe to Manufacturing Technologies

The Lead

Researchers collaborate to develop revolutionary 3D printing technology

March 17, 2015 10:30 am | by Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill | Videos | Comments

A 3D printing technology developed by Silicon Valley startup, Carbon3D Inc., enables objects to rise from a liquid media continuously rather than being built layer-by-layer as they have been for the past 25 years, representing a fundamentally new approach to 3D printing. The technology allows ready-to-use products to be made 25 to 100 times faster than other methods.

Additive manufacturing could greatly improve diabetes management

March 17, 2015 8:55 am | by David Stauth, Oregon State Univ. | News | Comments

Engineers at Oregon State Univ. have used additive manufacturing to create an improved type of...

3-D Printing Blasts Off

March 6, 2015 9:55 am | by Lindsay Hock, Editor | Videos | Comments

3-D printing isn’t just a commodity on Earth, it’s now also a commodity in space. In November...

Innovative wireless sensor technology yields better energy efficiency

March 2, 2015 8:17 am | by Sara Shoemaker, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Regulating comfort in small commercial buildings could become more efficient and less expensive...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

3-D printed parts to provide low-cost, custom alternatives for lab equipment

February 27, 2015 10:14 am | by Raphael Rosen, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Communications | News | Comments

The 3-D printing scene, a growing favorite of do-it-yourselfers, has spread to the study of plasma physics. With a series of experiments, researchers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory have found that 3-D printers can be an important tool in laboratory environments.

3-D printed guides can help restore function in damaged nerves

February 23, 2015 11:00 am | by Abigail Chard, Univ. of Sheffield | News | Comments

Scientists at the Univ. of Sheffield have succeeded in using a 3-D printed guide to help nerves damaged in traumatic incidents repair themselves. The team used the device to repair nerve damage in animal models and say the method could help treat many types of traumatic injury.

3-D Printing Blasts Off, Explodes Into the Future

February 13, 2015 1:15 pm | by Lindsay Hock, Editor | Articles | Comments

In 2013, battle lines were drawn. Two stark competitors were looking to speed repairs and cut costs on parts for gas turbines. First to the drawing board was GE, who started using 3-D printing technology at its Global Research Center in Niskayuna, N.Y., to produce more than 85,000 fuel nozzles for its anticipated LEAP engine technology.

Advertisement

Synthetic DNA Gel Key to Printing Organs

February 12, 2015 7:00 am | by Heriot-Watt Univ. | News | Comments

A two-part water-based gel made of synthetic DNA could bring the inventors of a 3-D bio printer closer to being able to print organs for transplant, or to replace animal testing. They faced two main challenges: finding a matrix or scaffold to support the live cells in 3-D, and being able to produce a consistent product which would not be rejected by transplant recipients.

3D printing with custom molecules creates low-cost mechanical sensor

February 10, 2015 8:03 am | by Hannah Hickey, Univ. of Washington | News | Comments

Imagine printing out molecules that can respond to their surroundings. A research project at the Univ. of Washington merges custom chemistry and 3D printing. Scientists created a bone-shaped plastic tab that turns purple under stretching, offering an easy way to record the force on an object.

Artificial blood vessels

February 3, 2015 11:17 am | by Jason Socrates Bardi, American Institute of Physics | News | Comments

By combining micro-imprinting and electro-spinning techniques, researchers at Shanghai Univ. have developed a vascular graft composed of three layers for the first time. This tri-layered composite has allowed researchers to utilize separate materials that respectively possess mechanical strength and promote new cell growth, a significant problem for existing vascular grafts that have only consisted of a single or double layer.

Tell us your 3D printing experiences

February 3, 2015 9:13 am | by R&D Magazine Editors | News | Comments

The editors of R&D Magazine are looking for speakers to participate in a webinar on “Using Multiple Materials in 3D Printing.” Candidates are asked to give a 15-min PowerPoint-based talk over the phone on their experiences in fabricating 3D printed products using multiple materials or developing the processes and/or technologies to accomplish this.

Evaluating Measured Topographies on Surfaces Made by Additive Manufacturing

January 14, 2015 10:05 am | by Yuqi Zeng, Kaixi Wang, Brad C. Mello, Zhijie Wang and Christopher A. Brown, Surface Metrology Laboratory, Worcester Polytechnic Institute | Articles | Comments

In all manufacturing processes there are limits to the surface topographies that can be produced. These limits can be represented in part by crossover scales. Understanding these scales is important for selecting process variables in additive manufacturing (AM). This study evaluated the measured topographies on surfaces made by an AM process for polymers.

Advertisement

New algorithm a Christmas gift to 3-D printing

December 15, 2014 2:23 pm | by Carol Thorbes, Univ. Communications, Simon Fraser Univ. | News | Comments

Just in time for Christmas, Simon Fraser Univ. computing science professor Richard Zhang reveals how to print a 3-D Christmas tree efficiently and with zero material waste, using the world’s first algorithm for automatically decomposing a 3-D object into what are called pyramidal parts. A pyramidal part has a flat base with the remainder of the shape forming upwards over the base with no overhangs, much like a pyramid.

Yale joins with leader in 3-D organ printing to transform transplants

December 5, 2014 10:28 am | by Ziba Kashef, Yale Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers at Yale Univ. have joined forces with a leading 3-D biology company, Organovo, to develop 3-D printed tissues for transplant research. As the number of donors for vital tissue and organ transplants decreases worldwide and the demand for transplants increases, 3-D bioprinting technology offers a solution to a long-standing and growing problem.

Space station's 3-D printer pops out first creation

November 25, 2014 8:43 pm | by Marcia Dunn, Associated Press | News | Comments

The first 3-D printer in space has popped out its first creation. The 3-D printer delivered to the International Space Station two months ago made a sample part for itself this week. It churned out a faceplate for the print head casing.

Unleashing the Power of 3-D Printing: Designing for Additive Manufacturability

November 19, 2014 1:44 pm | by Bill Camuel, Project Engineering Manager, RedEye | Articles | Comments

Additive manufacturing, widely known as 3-D printing, offers many advantages over traditional manufacturing methods such as injection molding and machining, which limit a part’s geometry and size. By freeing manufacturers from these design constraints, additive manufacturing helps create complex parts that spark innovation and save companies time and money.

Efficient method developed to measure residual stress in 3-D printed parts

November 17, 2014 10:08 am | by Kenneth Ma, LLNL | News | Comments

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have developed an efficient method to measure residual stress in metal parts produced by powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing. This 3-D printing process produces metal parts layer by layer using a high-energy laser beam to fuse metal powder particles.

Advertisement

Outside-the-box thinker

November 3, 2014 7:42 am | by Julia, Sklar, MIT News Correspondent | News | Comments

When an aspiring mechanical engineer on a budget wants a top-of-the-line guitar, what does he do? He makes it himself, of course. At age 13, Nathan Spielberg—now a Massachusetts Institute of Technology senior—began building his first guitar, a process that consumed his attention for eight hours a day, every weekend, for 3 1/2 years.

Self-assembled membranes hint at biomedical applications

October 28, 2014 11:36 am | by David Lindley, Argonne National Laboratory | News | Comments

Techniques for self-assembling of molecules have grown increasingly sophisticated, but biological structures remain a challenge. Recently, scientists have used self-assembly under controlled conditions to create a membrane consisting of layers with distinctly different structures. At the Advanced Photon Source, the team has studied the structures and how they form, paving the way for hierarchical structures with biomedical applications.

Cooking up carbon: Sawdust and iron in the melting pot

October 24, 2014 10:16 am | News | Comments

Researchers in the U.K. have found a new way to make nanostructured carbon using the waste product sawdust. By cooking sawdust with a thin coating of iron at 700 C, they have discovered that they can create carbon with a structure made up of many tiny tubes. These tubes are one thousand times smaller than an average human hair.

New 3-D printing algorithms speed production, reduce waste

October 22, 2014 7:51 am | by Emil Venere, Purdue Univ. | News | Comments

New software algorithms have been shown to significantly reduce the time and material needed to produce objects with 3-D printers. Because the printers create objects layer-by-layer from the bottom up, this poses a challenge when printing overhanging or protruding features like a figure's outstretched arms. They must be formed using supporting structures—which are later removed—adding time and material to the process.

Starfish shell-mimicking crystals could advance 3-D printing pills

October 21, 2014 8:19 am | by Nicole Casal Moore, Univ. of Michigan | News | Comments

In a design that mimics a hard-to-duplicate texture of starfish shells, Univ. of Michigan engineers have made rounded crystals that have no facets. The team calls the crystals "nanolobes". The nanolobes' shape and the way they're made have promising applications. The geometry could potentially be useful to guide light in advanced LEDs, solar cells and non-reflective surfaces.

Goldilocks principle wrong for particle assembly

October 20, 2014 9:32 am | by New York Univ. | News | Comments

Microscopic particles that bind under low temperatures will melt as temperatures rise to moderate levels, but re-connect under hotter conditions, a team of New York Univ. scientists has found. Their discovery points to new ways to create "smart materials," cutting-edge materials that adapt to their environment by taking new forms, and to sharpen the detail of 3-D printing.

Keeping an Eye on Quality

October 16, 2014 2:57 pm | by Olympus | Articles | Comments

A leader in the field of minimally invasive surgery device development operates state-of-the-art R&D and manufacturing facilities—facilities that depend on today’s most advanced quality assurance/quality testing procedures. To ensure all equipment leaving its production facilities meets the highest performance and reliability standards, the company relies on a QA/QC system made possible by industrial microscope and analyzer solutions.

Research reveals unique capabilities of 3-D printing

October 16, 2014 8:51 am | by Morgan McCorkle, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated an additive manufacturing method to control the structure and properties of metal components with precision unmatched by conventional manufacturing processes. The researchers demonstrated the method using an ARCAM electron beam melting system (EBM), in which successive layers of a metal powder are fused together by an electron beam into a 3-D product.

The new family portrait? 3-D-printed statue selfies

October 10, 2014 11:52 am | by Peter Svensson, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

The advent of digital cameras and smartphones killed the traditional mall portrait studio, but 3-D printing has sparked a new trend. Overloaded with digital photos, statues may be moving in to fulfill our desire for portraits that stand out. New York's Museum of Art and Design offered scans and statues earlier this year. Shapeways, the company that supplied the exhibit, scanned about 6,000 people and sold about 1,500 statues for $30.

SpaceX launches space station supplies, first 3-D printer bound for orbit

September 22, 2014 9:01 am | by Marcia Dunn, The Associated Press | News | Comments

A SpaceX cargo ship rocketed toward the International Space Station on Sunday, carrying more than 5,000 pounds of supplies, including the first 3-D printer for astronauts in orbit. The printer, developed by Made in Space, is sturdier than Earthly models and is a technology demonstrator. . But NASA envisions astronauts one day using one to crank out spare parts as needed.

Ceramics don’t have to be brittle

September 11, 2014 5:00 pm | by Kimm Fesenmaier, Caltech | News | Comments

Imagine a balloon that could float without using any lighter-than-air gas. Instead, it could simply have all of its air sucked out while maintaining its filled shape. Such a material might be possible with a new method developed at the California Institute of Technology that allows engineers to produce a ceramic that contains about 99.9% air yet is strong enough to recover its original shape after being smashed by more than 50%.

World’s first 3-D printed car being assembled at IMTS

September 10, 2014 6:15 pm | Videos | Comments

During the six-day IMTS manufacturing technology show in Chicago this week, the “Strati” will be the first vehicle printed in one piece using direct digital manufacturing. The process will take more than 44 hours of print time. A team including Local Motors, Cincinnati Inc. and Oak Ridge National Laboratory will then rapidly assemble it for a historic first set for Saturday.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading