Advertisement
Manufacturing Methods
Subscribe to Manufacturing Methods

The Lead

3-D Printing: A New Manufacturing Staple

April 15, 2014 9:24 am | by Lindsay Hock, Managing Editor | Stratasys, Ltd. | Articles | Comments

Thirty years have passed since 3-D printers first appeared, but only recently have they hinted at a new era of manufacturing. The first working 3-D printer was created in 1984 by Chuck Hull of 3D Systems Corp. This early device, based on stereolithography, gave way to the first truly practical 3-D printing, or “3DP”, technology patented by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1993.

LLNL shines new light on additive manufacturing approach

April 11, 2014 8:14 am | by James A Bono, LLNL | News | Comments

For nearly a century, electrophoretic deposition (EPD) has been used as a method of coating...

Scalable CVD process for making 2-D molybdenum diselenide

April 8, 2014 11:04 am | News | Comments

Nanoengineering researchers at Rice Univ. and Nanyang Technological Univ. in Singapore have...

Squeezing light into metals

March 7, 2014 7:50 am | News | Comments

Using an inexpensive inkjet printer, Univ. of Utah electrical engineers produced microscopic...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

3-D printer creates transformative device for heart treatment

February 26, 2014 9:54 am | by Beth Miller, Washington Univ., St. Louis | News | Comments

Using an inexpensive 3-D printer, biomedical engineers have developed a custom-fitted, implantable device with embedded sensors that could transform treatment and prediction of cardiac disorders. An international team has created a 3-D elastic membrane made of a soft, flexible, silicon material that is precisely shaped to match the heart’s epicardium, or the outer layer of the wall of the heart.

Sustainable manufacturing system to better consider the human component

February 20, 2014 11:43 am | News | Comments

Engineers at Oregon State Univ. have developed a new approach toward sustainable manufacturing that begins on the factory floor and tries to encompass the totality of manufacturing issues, including economic, environmental and social impacts. This approach, they say, builds on previous approaches that considered various facets of sustainability in a more individual manner.

An essential step toward printing living tissues

February 19, 2014 9:29 am | News | Comments

A new bioprinting method developed at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard Univ. creates intricately patterned 3-D tissue constructs with multiple types of cells and tiny blood vessels. The work represents a major step toward a longstanding goal of tissue engineers: creating human tissue constructs realistic enough to test drug safety and effectiveness.

Advertisement

New advance in 3-D printing and tissue engineering technology

February 11, 2014 8:46 am | News | Comments

Researchers have introduced a unique microrobotic technique to assemble the components of complex materials, the foundation of tissue engineering and 3-D printing. Tissue engineering and 3-D printing have become vitally important to the future of medicine for many reasons. The shortage of available organs for transplantation, for example, leaves many patients on waiting lists for life-saving treatment.

Trace Early, Trace Often to Improve Your Development Process

February 7, 2014 2:45 pm | by Matt Harp, Product Marketing Director, Seapine Software | Articles | Comments

Many companies have recognized an untapped opportunity for improving their development process: the requirements traceability matrix. Rather than wait until the end of the development cycle, the team builds the trace matrix when requirements first go under design control, and maintains it all the way through the submission process.

The Laser-Sintering Effect

February 6, 2014 10:41 am | by Lindsay Hock, Managing Editor | Articles | Comments

Exposed on a vertical face, rock climbers rely on their instincts and experience just as much as their equipment for survival. Depending on the climb, an assortment of gear is used for a successful ascension to the top—carabineers, cams, harnesses, specialized climbing shoes. Different styles of footwear are used for finessing cracks, balancing on small toeholds or smearing sloping slabs, the choice depends on individual preference.

Researchers improve process for manufacturing efficient solar cells

February 6, 2014 9:04 am | by Bill Kisliuk, Univ. of California, Los Angeles | News | Comments

Working on the cutting edge of a newly emerging area of solar-cell research, Univ. of California, Los Angeles engineers have invented a new process for manufacturing highly efficient photovoltaic materials that shows promise for low-cost industrial production. The new process uses so-called perovskite materials, which in the past few years have significantly advanced scientists' efforts to create the next generation of solar cells.

Self-organization controls “length” of supramolecular polymers

February 4, 2014 9:08 am | News | Comments

In a world’s first, researchers at the National Institute of Materials Science in Japan have succeeded in controlling the length of a one-dimensional, or supramolecular, assembly of molecules. Their method involves molecular self-organization, which until now has not been practical for polymer synthesis because of a lack of knowledge about the interplay of organizational pathways.

Advertisement

ORNL, Local Motors sign CRADA to enable rapid design, manufacturing of vehicles

January 30, 2014 8:14 am | by Morgan McCorkle, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Local Motors Inc. and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have signed a new partnership to develop and deliver technology to produce the world’s first production 3-D printed vehicle. The CRADA between Local Motors and ORNL will explore making vehicle construction more efficient, including lower production time, costs and part count, coupled with higher standards of control, safety, aesthetics and mechanical flexibility.

Engineers teach old chemical new tricks to make cleaner fuels, fertilizers

January 27, 2014 2:03 pm | News | Comments

Researchers from two continents have engineered an efficient and environmentally friendly catalyst for the production of molecular hydrogen (H2), a compound used extensively in modern industry to manufacture fertilizer and refine crude oil into gasoline. The new method can product industrial quantities of hydrogen without emitting carbon into the atmosphere.

3-D printed soil reveals the world beneath our feet

January 27, 2014 8:21 am | by Kirsty Cameron, Abertay Univ. | Videos | Comments

Soil scientists at Abertay Univ. are using 3-D printing technology to find out, for the very first time, exactly what is going on in the world beneath our feet. In the same way that ecologists study the interactions of living organisms above ground, Prof.Wilfred Otten and researchers at the university’s SIMBIOS Centre are taking advantage of the new technology to do the same below ground.

Researchers make a 3-D strutted framework from graphene for the first time

January 10, 2014 12:18 pm | News | Comments

A new fabrication method inspired by blown sugar art has been used to make structure in which an ultrathin graphene layer, or layers, is glued to a 3-D strutted framework. The researchers in Japan, calling this the “chemical blowing method”, overcomes the weak intersheet connections that have made this type of structure so difficult to create in the past.

Simple technique may drive down biofuel production costs

January 7, 2014 8:21 am | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a simple, effective and relatively inexpensive technique for removing lignin from the plant material used to make biofuels, which may drive down the cost of biofuel production. Lignin, nature’s way of protecting plant cell walls, is difficult to break down or remove from biomass. However, that lignin needs to be extracted in order to reach the energy-rich cellulose that is used to make biofuels.

Advertisement

Cells from the eye inkjet printed for the first time

December 18, 2013 2:05 pm | News | Comments

A group of researchers from the U.K. have used inkjet printing technology to successfully print cells taken from the eye for the very first time. The breakthrough, detailed in Biofabrication, could lead to the production of artificial tissue grafts made from the variety of cells found in the human retina and may aid in the search to cure blindness.

Researchers investigate role of consumers in sustainable product development

December 5, 2013 9:02 am | News | Comments

From green electricity tariffs to car sharing schemes, many sustainable products and services are being brought to market by start-ups. However, there has been relatively little research into how and why individuals take this step and whether their start-ups become a success. Fourteen European institutes coordinated by the Technical Univ.  of Munich will be investigating this trend to see what potential it holds for a sustainable economy.

How Science Can “Grow Up” in 2014

December 2, 2013 12:21 pm | by Ted Pawela, Senior Director of Product Portfolio Management, Accelrys Inc., San Diego, Calif. | Articles | Comments

While business operations have matured to help better commercialize new products, an important puzzle piece is missing. Companies must fill this gap to complete the big picture and accelerate innovation. That missing piece is science. Over the past few decades, process manufacturing industries adapted business operations to effectively manage transformational changes.

Energy savings in 3-D

November 21, 2013 7:37 am | News | Comments

Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working with aircraft makers to determine energy savings through the use of additive manufacturing, also known as 3-D printing. The research team is printing airplane parts to show additive manufacturing’s potential as a technology that should be considered foundational to processes seeking more energy efficiency.

From knee to neuron, offspring of Yale’s 3-D printers multiply

November 12, 2013 8:34 am | News | Comments

Yale Univ. neuroscientist Gordon Shepherd has studied neurons for decades. But until recently he’d never had a neuron he could grasp with his own two hands: Neurons are much too small. Now he’s got his very own 3-D neuron in all its spidery glory, a vastly enlarged but precise replica that is the latest custom-made anatomical model to emerge from the Yale Center for Engineering Innovation and Design (CEID).

4-D printing technology developed for composite materials

October 23, 2013 8:17 am | News | Comments

Researchers at the Univ. of Colorado Boulder have successfully added a fourth dimension to their printing technology, opening up exciting possibilities for the creation and use of adaptive, composite materials in manufacturing, packaging and biomedical applications. The researchers incorporated “shape memory” polymer fibers into the composite materials used in traditional 3-D printing.

Vitamin boost for 3-D printing

October 23, 2013 7:52 am | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State Univ., the Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Laser Zentrum Hannover have discovered that a naturally occurring compound can be incorporated into 3-D printing processes to create medical implants out of non-toxic polymers. The compound is riboflavin, which is better known as vitamin B2.

3-D printing: The greener choice

October 4, 2013 7:41 am | News | Comments

3-D printing isn’t just cheaper, it’s also greener, says Joshua Pearce, a Michigan Technological Univ. assoc. prof. of materials science and engineering/electrical and computer engineering. Even Pearce, an aficionado of the make-it-yourself-and-save technology, was surprised at his study’s results. It showed that 3-D printer use less energy and release less carbon dioxide than producing stuff in a factory and shipping it to a warehouse.

Grant opens new dimension in printing: 4-D

October 1, 2013 2:02 pm | News | Comments

With a $855,000 grant from the U.S. Army Research Office, a trio of university researchers is proposing the development a new printing technology that adds a fourth dimension. By manipulating materials at the micro- and nanoscale dimensions, they hope to develop printable structures that can exhibit behavior that changes over time.

Achieving an innovation nation

September 25, 2013 7:42 am | by Peter Dizikes, MIT News Office | News | Comments

The U.S. economy retains myriad sources of innovative capacity; but not enough of the innovations occurring in America today reach the marketplace, according to a major two-year Massachusetts Institute of Technology study. The report found that potentially valuable innovations occur throughout the advanced manufacturing sector and in companies of all sizes, from multinational conglomerates to specialized “Main Street” firms.

Tiny antennas let long light waves see in infrared

September 24, 2013 7:56 am | News | Comments

Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers have developed arrays of tiny nanoantennas that can enable sensing of molecules that resonate in the infrared (IR) spectrum. Other nanoscale antenna systems can't be tuned to a longer light wavelength due to limitations of traditional nanoantenna materials. The team used highly doped semiconductors, grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

Interlocking segments might be 3-D printed, assembled into parts

September 11, 2013 10:46 am | News | Comments

Purdue Univ. researchers are working with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory to develop a technology for creating parts out of interlocking segments produced using 3-D printing to repair vehicles and other equipment in the field. The Purdue portion of the research focuses on clever, Lego-like building blocks called "topologically interlocking structures”.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading