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Washington state school district gets tough about vaccines

April 14, 2015 12:03 am | by Nicholas K. Geranios, Associated Press | News | Comments

Spokane school district officials on Monday removed from class 143 students who could not prove they had legally required vaccinations. More than 700 students in the state's second-largest district lack complete vaccination documents, so that number was expected to rise, district spokesman Kevin Morrison said. The crackdown began Monday morning.

Tetanus shot may aid treatment of deadly brain cancer

March 11, 2015 4:05 pm | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

Can a tetanus shot help treat brain cancer? A dose of tetanus vaccine let patients live longer...

Swine flu outbreak in India raises concern

March 11, 2015 12:54 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Since December, an outbreak of swine flu in India has killed more than 1,200 people, and a new...

Large-scale test of Ebola vaccine begins

March 6, 2015 12:53 pm | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

The World Health Organization will start large-scale testing of an experimental Ebola vaccine in...

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Flu winds down as FDA aims for better vaccine next winter

March 4, 2015 5:10 pm | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

The miserable flu season is winding down but not quite over yet, health officials said Wednesday, even the government picked what it hoped would be a better vaccine recipe for next fall and winter. If it seems early to worry about the next flu season, well, producing 140 million doses of vaccine requires starting months in advance.

Health officials perplexed by vaccination skeptics

March 3, 2015 3:08 pm | by Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

Certain that they are right, struggling to find ways to get their message across, public health officials are exasperated by their inability to convince more U.S. parents to vaccinate their children. They say they are contending with a small minority of parents who are misinformed about the risks of inoculations.

Heat blamed for spray vaccine's failure against swine flu

February 26, 2015 1:10 pm | by Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

The makers of the nasal spray version of the flu vaccine say they now know why it didn't protect young children against swine flu—the doses got too warm. The spray FluMist works well for most flu strains, but small studies found it didn't work very well against the swine flu bug that first emerged in 2009.

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Washington state panel mulls bill to trim vaccine exemptions

February 17, 2015 4:28 pm | by Rachel La Corte,Associated Press | News | Comments

Personal or philosophical opposition to vaccines would not be an authorized exemption for the parents of school-age children under a measure that received a public hearing before a House committee on Tuesday, drawing at least two dozen opponents to the proposed change.

Vaccine opposition has ebbed and flowed over centuries

February 14, 2015 3:49 am | by Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

They're considered one of mankind's greatest medical achievements, yet people have balked at vaccines almost since the time of the first vaccination—in 1796, when an English country doctor named Edward Jenner inoculated an 8-year-old boy against smallpox. In the mid-1800s, people protested in the streets of Victorian England after the British government began requiring citizens to get the vaccination.

Nasty flu season has peaked, is retreating

February 13, 2015 2:16 pm | by Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

A new report shows this winter's nasty flu season has peaked and is clearly retreating. The flu reached its highest levels around the beginning of January, and stayed there for weeks. The government report out Friday shows flu has become less widespread and less intense in the last couple of weeks in most parts of the country.

Twists, turns, eventually lead to promising Ebola vaccine

February 9, 2015 4:18 am | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

It took 16 years of twists and turns. Over and over, Dr. Nancy Sullivan thought she was close to an Ebola vaccine, only to see the next experiment fail. "A case of resuscitation more than once," is how the National Institutes of Health researcher describes the journey.

Debate over vaccine requirements forges strange alliance

February 6, 2015 1:13 pm | by Nicholas Riccardi, Associated Press | News | Comments

The debate over whether parents should be required to get their children vaccinated against measles has created strange alliances, putting some liberal parents on the same side as Republican conservatives. While the two parties are not cleanly divided on the issue in the nation's state legislatures, it is increasingly the GOP that resists efforts to stiffen requirements on vaccinating kids.

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Evaluating strategies for HIV vaccination

February 6, 2015 11:21 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Through an investigation of a fundamental process that guides the maturation of immune cells, researchers have revealed new insights into possible ways to vaccinate people to generate potent antibodies of the type that are predicted to offer protection against diverse strains of the highly mutable HIV. 

Federal health officials face tough questions on flu vaccine

February 3, 2015 1:20 pm | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

Federal health officials are facing questioning about why this year's flu vaccine isn't giving good protection against the winter menace. This is a particularly bad flu season, and one reason is that the most common flu strain isn't a good match to this year's vaccine. Lawmakers on Tuesday asked why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention didn't act months ago when concerns first arose to create a better-matched vaccine.

Toward a cocaine vaccine to help addicts kick the habit

January 22, 2015 8:44 am | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

In their decades-long search for vaccines against drugs of abuse, scientists have hit upon a new approach to annul cocaine’s addictive buzz. They report in Molecular Pharmaceutics that their strategy, which they tested on mice, harnesses a bacterial protein to trigger an immune system attack on the drug if it enters the body. This response could dull cocaine’s psychotropic effects and potentially help users of the drug kick the habit.

Flu vaccine 23% effective

January 16, 2015 2:04 pm | by Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

As predicted, this year's flu vaccine is doing a pretty crummy job. It's only 23% effective, primarily because it doesn't include the bug that is making most people sick, according to a government study released today. That's one of the worst performances in the last decade, since U.S. health officials started routinely tracking how well vaccines work. In the best flu seasons, the vaccines were 50 to 60% effective.

New approach may lead to inhalable vaccines for influenza, pneumonia

January 8, 2015 9:29 am | by Matt Shipman, News Services, North Carolina State Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers at North Carolina State Univ. and the Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have uncovered a novel approach to creating inhalable vaccines using nanoparticles that shows promise for targeting lung-specific diseases, such as influenza, pneumonia and tuberculosis.

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CDC: Flu season continues to worsen, could peak this month

January 5, 2015 5:35 pm | by By Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

The flu is now widespread in all but seven states, and hospitalization rates match the dismal season two years ago. While health officials fear this will be an unusually bad year, it's too soon to say. The latest figures released Monday by the CDC show the flu hitting hard in most of the 43 states where the illness was widespread. But the flu was not yet rampant in populous states like California and New York.

HIV vaccines should avoid viral target cells

January 5, 2015 8:09 am | by Lisa Newbern, Emory Univ. | News | Comments

Vaccines designed to protect against HIV can backfire and lead to increased rates of infection. This unfortunate effect has been seen in more than one vaccine clinical trial. Scientists at Emory Univ. have newly published results that support a straightforward explanation for the backfire effect: vaccination may increase the number of immune cells that serve as viral targets.

Grant Supports Use of Data Science to Optimize HIV Care

December 30, 2014 9:30 am | by Brown University | News | Comments

HIV can be treated, but not every infection responds the same way. Treatment requires monitoring and testing, a practice that can become expensive for health care systems in the developing world.                                    

Improving Patient Access through Public-Private Partnerships

December 15, 2014 1:20 pm | by Brian Goff, Global Franchise Head, Hemophilia, Baxter BioScience | Articles | Comments

As the health care industry is undergoing a rapid transformation driven by evolving economic and regulatory demands, the biopharmaceutical industry also faces numerous challenges in meeting the needs of patients around the globe. Emerging markets are faced with the challenges of ensuring access to innovative, personalized treatments for patients with critical or rare conditions.

Ebola vaccine trial suspended after side effects

December 11, 2014 12:12 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Swiss researchers have suspended the testing of one of the leading Ebola vaccine candidates after some volunteers reported unexpected side effects.                             

Injectable 3-D vaccines could fight cancer, infectious diseases

December 8, 2014 4:13 pm | by Kat J. McAlpine, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering | News | Comments

One of the reasons cancer is so deadly is that it can evade attack from the body's immune system, which allows tumors to flourish and spread. Scientists can try to induce the immune system, known as immunotherapy, to go into attack mode to fight cancer and to build long lasting immune resistance to cancer cells. Now, researchers have developed a non–surgical injection of programmable biomaterial to do so.

Flu vaccine doesn’t protect against most dominant strain

December 5, 2014 9:08 am | by Associated Press, Mike Stobbe | News | Comments

The flu vaccine may not be very effective this winter, according to U.S. health officials who worry this may lead to more serious illnesses and deaths. Flu season has begun to ramp up, and officials say the vaccine does not protect well against the dominant strain seen most commonly so far this year. That strain tends to cause more deaths and hospitalizations, especially in the elderly.

Ebola vaccine seems safe in first-stage testing

November 26, 2014 6:00 pm | by By Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

An experimental Ebola vaccine appears safe and triggered signs of immune protection in the first 20 volunteers to test it, U.S. researchers reported. The vaccine is designed to spur the immune system's production of anti-Ebola antibodies, and people developed them within four weeks of getting the shots at the National Institutes of Health.

A hybrid vehicle that delivers DNA

November 26, 2014 7:46 am | by Cory Nealon, Univ. at Buffalo | News | Comments

A new hybrid vehicle is under development. Its performance isn’t measured by the distance it travels, but rather the delivery of its cargo: vaccines that contain genetically engineered DNA to fight HIV, cancer, influenza and other maladies. The technology is a biomedical advancement that could help unleash the potential of DNA vaccines, which despite much research, have yet to make a significant impact in the treatment of major illnesses.

Government wants more clinical trial results made public

November 19, 2014 3:00 pm | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The government proposed new rules Wednesday to make it easier for doctors and patients to learn if clinical trials of treatments worked or not. Thousands of Americans participate in clinical trials every year, testing new treatments, comparing old ones or helping to uncover general knowledge about health. Many of the studies are reported in scientific journals and trumpeted in the news.

Biochemists build largest synthetic molecular “cage” ever

November 19, 2014 10:26 am | by Stuart Wolpert, Univ. of California, Los Angeles | News | Comments

Univ. of California, Los Angeles biochemists have created the largest-ever protein that self-assembles into a molecular “cage.” The research could lead to synthetic vaccines that protect people from the flu, HIV and other diseases. At a size hundreds of times smaller than a human cell, it also could lead to new methods of delivering pharmaceuticals inside of cells, or to the creation of new nanoscale materials.

Study will test survivors' blood to treat Ebola

November 18, 2014 11:00 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A coalition of companies and aid groups announced plans Tuesday to test experimental drugs and collect blood plasma from Ebola survivors to treat new victims of the disease in West Africa. Plasma from survivors contains antibodies, substances the immune system makes to fight the virus.

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