Advertisement
Emerging Technologies
Subscribe to Emerging Technologies

The Lead

Thomson Reuters launch new analytics platform, InCites

July 31, 2014 11:55 am | News | Comments

An integrated, web-based platform for measuring research output and impact, monitoring trends and benchmarking, InCites is Thomson Reuters’ latest effort to allow users to easily assess and look beyond the global influence of a specific journal to conduct transparent analysis and make better decisions. The expanded assessment solution has been implemented on the 2014 edition of Journal Citation Reports.

Corning donates $1.8M mirror for space telescope

July 29, 2014 11:25 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Corning Inc. has donated $1.8 million in high-tech components for a telescope a private group...

Psychology researchers explore how engineers create

June 17, 2014 4:31 pm | News | Comments

Simply put, engineers make things. But is finding...

Researchers investigate role of consumers in sustainable product development

December 5, 2013 9:02 am | News | Comments

From green electricity tariffs to car sharing...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Tesla promises to add charging stations

May 31, 2013 10:26 am | News | Comments

On Thursday, electric car maker Tesla Motors Inc. said that by the end of next month it will triple the number of charging stations it runs from the current eight. The number will go to around 100 in the coming year, putting stations within reach of almost the entire populations of both U.S. and Canada. The expanded "supercharger" network will allow owners of Tesla's $70,000 Model S sedans to travel from Los Angeles to New York.

Research suggests modular design competence can benefit new product development

May 22, 2013 8:52 am | News | Comments

Supplier integration refers to a supplier providing information and participating in decision-making during the development of new products and processes. A new research study suggests that supplier integration into the new product development process can be more beneficial if buyers increase their competency in conceiving of products in terms of modules that can be modified without changing an overall product design.

Robot hot among surgeons but US taking fresh look

April 9, 2013 2:02 pm | by LINDSEY TANNER - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The biggest thing in operating rooms these days is a million-dollar, multi-armed robot named da Vinci, used in nearly 400,000 surgeries in America last year—triple the number just four years earlier. But now the high-tech helper is under scrutiny over reports of problems, including several deaths that may be linked with it, and the high cost of using the robotic system.

Advertisement

Costs of U.S. solar photovoltaic systems continues to decline

November 28, 2012 8:39 am | News | Comments

The installed price of solar photovoltaic (PV) power systems in the United States fell substantially in 2011 and through the first half of 2012, according to the latest edition of Tracking the Sun, an annual PV cost-tracking report produced by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. Recent installed price reductions are attributable, in large part, to dramatic reductions in PV module prices, which have been falling precipitously since 2008.

Fractals Offer a Better Way to Manage Complex Systems

November 12, 2012 3:15 pm | by Paulo Adler | Articles | Comments

A fractal is an object found in advanced geometry that is "recursive" in that it repeats itself in patterns, infinitely. These objects have formed the basis for computer programming that allows two lines of code to perform tasks, potentially forever. These formulas will very soon be fundamentally changing how we manage information and organizations globally.

Advance could help soldiers, athletes rebound from traumatic brain injuries

October 18, 2012 11:23 am | News | Comments

Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) disrupt the supply of oxygen-rich blood to the brain significantly, hurting chances for successful recovery. Nanotechnology experts have recently found through testing in mice that a certain type of carbon nanoparticle, when administered immediately following TBI, acted like antioxidants, rapidly restoring blood flow to the brain following resuscitation.

Developing the next generation of microsensors

October 18, 2012 8:01 am | by Kimm Fesenmaier | News | Comments

Thanks to an ultrasensitive accelerometer—a type of motion detector—developed by researchers at the California Institute of Technology and the University of Rochester, a new class of microsensors is a step closer to reality. Instead of using an electrical circuit to gauge movements, this accelerometer uses laser light and is so sensitive it could be used to navigate shoppers through a grocery aisle or even stabilize fighter jets.

Study confirms magnetic properties of silicon nanoribbons

October 18, 2012 7:32 am | News | Comments

Nanoribbons of silicon configured so the atoms resemble chicken wire could hold the key to ultrahigh density data storage and information processing systems of the future. This was a key finding of an Oak Ridge National Laboratory team who used scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to validate first principle calculation that for years had predicted this outcome.

Advertisement

At the nanoscale, graphite can turn friction upside down

October 17, 2012 12:21 pm | News | Comments

If you ease up on a pencil, does it slide more easily? Sure. But maybe not if the tip is sharpened down to nanoscale dimensions. A team of researchers at NIST has found that if graphite is sticky enough, as measured by a nanoscale probe, it actually becomes harder to slide a tip across the material's surface as you decrease pressure—the exact opposite of our everyday experience.  

New military apparel repels chemical, biological agents

October 17, 2012 8:17 am | News | Comments

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists and collaborators are developing a new military uniform material that repels chemical and biological agents using a novel carbon nanotube fabric. The material will be designed to undergo a rapid transition from a breathable state to a protective state.

New techniques stretch carbon nanotubes, make stronger composites

October 15, 2012 9:38 am | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed new techniques for stretching carbon nanotubes (CNT) and using them to create carbon composites that can be used as stronger, lighter materials. By stretching the CNT material before incorporating it into a composite for use in finished products, the researchers straighten the CNTs in the material, which significantly improves its tensile strength.

Another advance on the road to spintronics

October 15, 2012 9:23 am | News | Comments

Using a new technique called HARPES, for hard X-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers have unlocked the ferromagnetic secrets of dilute magnetic semiconductors, materials of great interest for spintronic technology.

Researchers find way to prevent cracking in nanoparticle films

October 12, 2012 8:17 am | News | Comments

Making uniform coatings is a common engineering challenge, and, when working at the nanoscale, even the tiniest cracks or defects can be a big problem. New research from University of Pennsylvania engineers has shown a new way of avoiding such cracks when depositing thin films of nanoparticles based on spin-coating.

Advertisement

Researchers create nanoflowers for energy storage, solar cells

October 11, 2012 8:39 am | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University have created flower-like structures out of germanium sulfide (GeS)—a semiconductor material—that have extremely thin petals with an enormous surface area. The GeS flower holds promise for next-generation energy storage devices and solar cells.

Demonstrating Development Risk Reduction

October 10, 2012 9:42 am | by Edward Brunner, Group Leader, Industrial and Scientific Group, Cambridge Consultants | Articles | Comments

A phased approach to product development, including models, can help reduce risks and end in rewards.

Method monitors semiconductor etching as it happens

October 1, 2012 3:26 am | News | Comments

University of Illinois researchers have a new, low-cost method to carve delicate features onto semiconductor wafers using light—and watch as it happens. The researchers' new technique can monitor a semiconductor's surface as it is etched, in real time, with nanometer resolution, using a special type of microscope that uses two beams of light to precisely measure topography.

Novel materials become multifunctional at ultimate quantum limit

September 25, 2012 9:17 am | News | Comments

A University of Arkansas physicist and his colleagues have examined the lower limits of novel materials called complex oxides and discovered that unlike conventional semiconductors the materials not only conduct electricity, but also develop unusual magnetic properties.

Research uncovers path to defect-free thin films

September 20, 2012 9:04 am | News | Comments

A team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory has discovered a strain relaxation phenomenon in cobaltites that has eluded researchers for decades and may lead to advances in fuel cells, magnetic sensors, and a host of energy-related materials. The finding could change the conventional wisdom that accommodating the strain inherent during the formation of epitaxial thin films involves structural defects.

Demonstrated: Nanotube transistors can survive space

September 18, 2012 6:02 am | News | Comments

As part of their investigation of the effects ionizing radiation has on crystalline structures found in single-walled carbon nanotube transistors, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory engineers have recently shown these devices can stand up harsh space environments. This durability has been achieved through a combination of a hardened dielectric material and the natural isolation of the transistor.

IBM scientists first to distinguish individual molecular bonds

September 13, 2012 1:04 pm | News | Comments

Using non-contact atomic force microscopy, researchers at IBM have been able to differentiate the chemical bonds in individual molecules for the first time. The results push the exploration of using molecules and atoms at the smallest scale and could be important for studying graphene devices.

Nanoengineers can print 3D microstructures in mere seconds

September 13, 2012 11:53 am | News | Comments

Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a novel technology that can fabricate, in mere seconds, microscale 3D structures out of soft, biocompatible hydrogels. Near term, the technology could lead to better systems for growing and studying cells, including stem cells, in the laboratory. Long-term, the goal is to be able to print biological tissues for regenerative medicine.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading