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Microsoft revamps MSN to flow across devices

September 8, 2014 12:25 am | by Mae Anderson - AP Technology Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Microsoft is giving its MSN news service a crisper look, new lifestyle tools and seamless syncing across devices. The company says the revamped site fits in with Microsoft's overall strategy of making mobile phones and Internet-based services priorities as its traditional businesses—Windows and Office software installed on desktops—slow down or decline.

A new foundation for mathematics

September 3, 2014 12:57 pm | by Florian Meyer, ETH Zurich | News | Comments

Proofs are the key method of mathematics. Until...

How Big is Big—Tall, Grande, Venti Data?

September 2, 2014 1:51 pm | by Nick Burch, CTO, Quanticate | Articles | Comments

Today, big data is a hot topic within almost every industry. May saw the biggest ever European...

A New Paradigm for R&D Prioritization

August 28, 2014 10:36 am | White Papers

A new white paper from Decision Lens teaches how world-class innovation teams create standard...

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Numerical Simulation of Multiphysics Processes

August 25, 2014 4:11 pm | Award Winners

Sandia National LaboratoriesGoma 6.0 is software for numerical simulation of multiphysics continuum processes, including moving geometry, phase-change, fluid-structural interactions, complex rheology and chemical reactions. It solves the fundamental equations of mass, momentum, energy and chemical species transport using the finite element method (FEM), which can be described by partial differential equations.

Heightened Multiphysics

August 25, 2014 3:53 pm | Award Winners

Modeling and simulation is standard practice in nearly every scientific field. Idaho National Laboratory’s Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) has transformed approaches to predictive simulation, making it quick, adaptable and more accessible. MOOSE is a computer software that can be loaded onto most UNIX-compliant operating systems including, but not limited to, Mac OS X, Ubuntu, OpenSuSE, Fedora, CentOS and Redhat.

Better Decision Making

August 25, 2014 3:40 pm | Award Winners

Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed iSPM: Intelligent Software Suite for Personalized Modeling of Expert Opinions, Decisions and Errors in Visual Examination Tasks, a novel technology utilizing eye-tracking hardware, an intelligent GUI engine and advanced analytics to predict an individual’s perceptual behavior, cognitive response and risk of error for complex decision tasks such as cancer diagnosis from medical images.

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Simplifying Electrolyte Selection

August 25, 2014 3:27 pm | Award Winners

Mapping of the human genome has advanced our understanding of life, health and potential cures for diseases. Many technologies could benefit from genome-level investigations. Now, a disruptive virtual scientific simulation tool that delivers a genome-level investigation for electrolytes is available. Idaho National Laboratory’s Kevin Gering has developed the Advanced Electrolyte Model (AEM), a molecular-based, scientifically proven simulation tool.

Researchers develop models to study polyelectrolytes

August 21, 2014 9:04 am | by Matt Shipman, News Services, North Carolina State Univ. | Videos | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State Univ. have developed a novel and versatile modeling strategy to simulate polyelectrolyte systems. The model has applications for creating new materials as well as for studying polyelectrolytes, including DNA and RNA. Polyelectrolytes are chains of molecules that are positively or negatively charged when placed in water.

New framework would facilitate use of new Android security modules

August 21, 2014 8:35 am | by Matt Shipman, News Services, North Carolina State Univ. | News | Comments

Computer security researchers have developed a modification to the core Android operating system that allows developers and users to plug in new security enhancements. The new Android Security Modules (ASM) framework aims to eliminate the bottleneck that prevents developers and users from taking advantage of new security tools.

Unlocking the potential of simulation software

August 21, 2014 7:44 am | by Rob Matheson, MIT News Office | News | Comments

With a method known as finite element analysis (FEA), engineers can generate 3-D digital models of large structures to simulate how they’ll fare under stress, vibrations, heat and other real-world conditions. Used for mapping out large-scale structures, these simulations require intensive computation done by powerful computers over many hours, costing engineering firms much time and money.

Chaos that Brings Order

August 20, 2014 4:29 pm | Award Winners

Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s DUCCS is ultra-efficient software that utilizes highly parallel chaotic map computations to quickly (in a few minutes) and efficiently detect component faults in computing units, memory elements and interconnects of hybrid CPU-GPU computing systems.

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Researchers develop defense software "TCP Stealth"

August 15, 2014 11:19 am | News | Comments

Port scanners are programs that search the Internet for systems that exhibit potential vulnerabilities. According to report published online, Hacienda is one such port scanning program. The report says that this program is being put into service by the "Five Eyes," a federation of Western secret services. Scientists have developed free software that can help prevent this kind of identification and thus the subsequent capture of systems.

New tool makes a single picture worth a thousand—and more—images

August 14, 2014 5:57 pm | by Sarah Yang, Univ. of California, Berkeley | Videos | Comments

Software developed by Univ. of California, Berkeley computer scientists seeks to tame the vast amount of visual data in the world by generating a single photo that can represent massive clusters of images. This tool can give users the photographic gist of a kid on Santa’s lap, housecats, or brides and grooms at their weddings. It works by generating an image that literally averages the key features of the other photos.

Researchers show that how fast you drive might reveal exactly where you are going

August 12, 2014 7:41 am | Videos | Comments

Rutgers Univ. researchers have shown that GPS technology is not needed to show where a driver traveled. A starting point and the driver's speed are enough when using a technique dubbed “elastic pathing”, which predicts pathways by seeing how speed patterns match street layouts. This could cause concerns for privacy, however, since many insurance companies offer discounts in return for customers allowing their driving habits to be monitored.

Report: Russian hackers steal 1.2B passwords

August 6, 2014 10:10 am | News | Comments

Russian hackers have stolen 1.2 billion user names and passwords in a series of Internet heists affecting 420,000 websites, according to a report published Tuesday. The thievery was described in a New York Times story based on the findings of Hold Security, a Milwaukee firm that has a history of uncovering online security breaches. For confidentiality reasons, the identities of the affected websites weren't identified by the Times.

Photo editing tool enables object images to be manipulated in 3-D

August 5, 2014 5:59 pm | News | Comments

Editors of photos routinely resize objects, or move them up, down or sideways, but Carnegie Mellon Univ. researchers are adding an extra dimension to photo editing by enabling editors to turn or flip objects any way they want, even exposing surfaces not visible in the original photograph.

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Thomson Reuters launch new analytics platform, InCites

July 31, 2014 11:55 am | News | Comments

An integrated, web-based platform for measuring research output and impact, monitoring trends and benchmarking, InCites is Thomson Reuters’ latest effort to allow users to easily assess and look beyond the global influence of a specific journal to conduct transparent analysis and make better decisions. The expanded assessment solution has been implemented on the 2014 edition of Journal Citation Reports.

Climate change research goes to the extremes

July 30, 2014 11:50 am | by Angela Herring, Northeastern Univ. | News | Comments

By now, most sci­en­tists agree that the tem­per­a­ture of the planet is rising and that the increase is due to human activ­i­ties. But the jury still out regarding the vari­ability of that increase. Researchers using “big data” computational tools have recently taken a systematic approach to answering this question and their results point to both higher global temperatures and increasing variability among those temperature extremes.

New gadget helps the vision impaired to read graphs

July 29, 2014 10:47 am | News | Comments

An affordable digital reading system invented by researchers in Australia now allows people who are blind to read more than just words. The device works by using pattern recognition technology and other methods on any document to identify images, graphs, maths or text. From here it is then converted to audio format with navigation markup.

Scientists enlist big data to guide conservation efforts

July 18, 2014 12:37 pm | by Robert Sanders, UC Berkeley | News | Comments

“Big data” has yet to make a mark on conservation efforts to preserve the planet’s biodiversity. But that may soon change with a new model developed by Univ. of California, Berkeley, biologist Brent Mishler and his colleagues in Australia. This effort  leverages the growing mass of data to take into account not only the number of species throughout an area, but also the variation among species and their geographic rarity, or endemism.

Virtual crowds produce real behavior insights

July 8, 2014 7:55 pm | Videos | Comments

A Brown Univ. group has developed a wireless virtual reality system to study a phenomenon that scientists don’t yet understand: How pedestrians interact with each other and how those individual behaviors, in turn, generate patterns of crowd movement. The system, which uses motion capture technology can immerse up to four people in a carefully controlled, realistic virtual crowd.

“Deep learning” makes search for exotic particles easier

July 2, 2014 3:12 pm | News | Comments

Fully automated "deep learning" by computers greatly improves the odds of discovering particles such as the Higgs boson, according to a recent study. In fact, this approach beats even veteran physicists' abilities, which now consists of developing mathematical formulas by hand to apply to data. New machine learning methods are rendering that approach unnecessary.

Google to show off smart home gadgets, wearables

June 25, 2014 8:14 am | by Barbara Ortutay, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

An Android update, wearable gadgets, and so-called smart home devices are just some of the innovations Google is likely to show off at its two-day developer conference, which begins today in San Francisco. In recent years, the conference has focused on smartphones and tablets, but this year Google's Android operating system is expected to stretch into cars, homes, and smartwatches.

Study shows puzzle games can improve mental flexibility

June 24, 2014 10:26 am | News | Comments

Executive functions in your brain are important for making decisions in everyday life when you have to deal with sudden changes in your environment. A recent study by scientists in Singapore showed that adults who played the physics-based puzzle video game Cut the Rope regularly, for as little as an hour a day, had improved executive functions. This marks the first time video games have been shown to deliver such broad improvements.

Supreme Court tosses out software patent

June 19, 2014 11:22 am | by Sam Hananel - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The Supreme Court on Thursday tossed out an Australian company's patent for business software in a closely watched case that clarifies standards for awarding patents. The justices ruled unanimously that the government should not have issued a patent to Alice Corp. in the 1990s because the company simply took an abstract idea that has been around for years and programmed it to run through a computer.

New effort to revolutionize time-keeping for cyber-physical systems

June 16, 2014 10:44 am | News | Comments

The National Science Foundation has announced a five-year, $4 million award to tackle the challenge of synchronizing time in cyber-physical systems, which are systems that integrate sensing, computation, control and networking into physical objects and infrastructure. The grant brings together expertise from five universities to improve the way computers maintain knowledge of time and synchronize it with other networked devices.

New computer program aims to teach itself everything about anything

June 13, 2014 11:11 am | by Michelle Ma, Univ. of Washington | Videos | Comments

Without a specific search term in mind, it can be surprisingly hard to find information on the Internet , or to know how to start searching. To help, computer scientists have created the first fully automated computer program that teaches everything there is to know about any visual concept. Called Learning Everything about Anything (LEVAN), the program searches millions of books and images to learn all possible variations of a concept.

How to Form an Engineering Simulation Plan

June 4, 2014 1:42 pm | by Nicholas M. Veikos, President, CAE Associates Inc., Middlebury, Conn. | Articles | Comments

Upon introducing engineering simulation into an organization, it’s important to formulate an implementation plan. Simply telling the engineering team to “have at it” doesn’t generally lead to positive results. Every plan will be different, but all can benefit from some basic considerations.

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