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California pushes to finish driverless car rules

March 12, 2014 1:44 pm | by Justin Pritchard, Associated Press | News | Comments

Once the stuff of science fiction, driverless cars could be commercially available by decade's end. Under a California law passed in 2012, the DMV must decide by the end of this year how to integrate the autonomous vehicles onto public roads. That means the regulation's writers will post draft language regulations around June, then alter the rules in response to public comment by fall in order to get them finalized by the end of 2014.

South By Southwest: Secrets, spying, chef Watson

March 11, 2014 11:49 am | by Barbara Ortutay, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

FOMO—or the fear of missing out—is a common complaint at the South By Southwest Interactive festival in Austin, Texas each year. It's here, after all, that "Girls" creator Lena Dunham spoke on Monday at the same time that NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden gave a teleconferenced talk. All the while, IBM showed off the capabilities of cognitive computing in a language anyone could understand: food.

Freudenberg Puts FEA Seal of Approval on Gasket

March 6, 2014 12:09 pm | by Nick O'Donohoe, Science and Technology Writer, Parker Group | Articles | Comments

The wind has long been used as a metaphor for constant change, wayward and capricious. Wind turbine engineers deal with that changeability every day, along with a host of other challenging factors. Their products must operate in desert sandstorms and in corrosive salt water. The ambient temperature at the turbine site can be blisteringly high or numbingly frigid.

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Push for Web addresses in era of search, apps

February 28, 2014 4:32 pm | by Anick Jesdanun, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

In the early days, you typed in a domain name address to reach a website. Then came the ability to reach websites directly through a search engine. The mobile era brought us phone apps for accessing services without either. Why bother in this mobile-heavy era? Yet the organization in charge of Internet addresses is pushing a major expansion in domain name suffixes, and at least 160 suffixes have been added since October.

Push for Web addresses in era of search, apps

February 28, 2014 4:32 pm | by Anick Jesdanun, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

In the early days, you typed in a domain name address to reach a website. Then came the ability to reach websites directly through a search engine. The mobile era brought us phone apps for accessing services without either. Why bother in this mobile-heavy era? Yet the organization in charge of Internet addresses is pushing a major expansion in domain name suffixes, and at least 160 suffixes have been added since October.

Applying Unified Laboratory Intelligence in a High-Throughput, Multi-Technique Environment

February 28, 2014 11:40 am | by Michael Boruta, Industry Solutions Manager, Advanced Chemistry Development Inc. (ACD/Labs) | Articles | Comments

Gathering all analytical data from different techniques for the same sample isn’t always an easy and routine task. This problem is amplified in high-throughput environments based on sheer volume alone. Review and analysis of information can be time consuming, leading to delays in decision-making that have detrimental effects on productivity and the speed of project completion.

Project to ensure “what you see is what you send”

February 25, 2014 4:43 pm | News | Comments

Imagine a user who intends to send $2 to a friend through PayPal. Embedded malware in the user’s laptop, however, converts the $2 transaction into a $2,000 transfer to the account of the malware author instead. Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology have created a prototype software, Gyrus, that takes steps to prevent malware from sending spam emails and instant messages, and blocking unauthorized commands such as money transfers.

Engineers in Korea develop head-mounted display with augmented reality chip

February 18, 2014 11:15 am | News | Comments

Researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have made a low-powered, high-speed, head-mounted display device they are calling K-Glass. This wearable electronic display has an augmented reality processor that enables users to do things like browse the menu, food and available tables of a restaurant simply by walking up to it and looking at its name.

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Computer whizzes brainstorm for cash at hackathons

February 18, 2014 10:42 am | by Martha Mendoza, AP National Writer | News | Comments

Computer programming competitions known as "hackathons" have spread like viruses in recent years as ways for geeks, nerds and designers to get together to eat pizza, lose sleep and create something new. The marathon brainstorming sessions are focused on everything from developing apps to using computer code to solve the world's problems. This year a record 1,500 hackathons are planned around the globe, up from just a handful in 2010.

Why Big Data Isn’t the Big Problem for Genomic Medicine

February 14, 2014 12:07 pm | by Michael Groner, VP of engineering and chief architect, and Trevor Heritage, VP of corporate development and strategy, Appistry Inc. | Articles | Comments

Buzzwords, like a virus, spread inexorably from discipline to discipline. Take “big data,” which originated in supercomputing and now has infected finance, logistics, intelligence and defense and life science. Is there some rule requiring every presentation on genomics to include a slide comparing sequencing costs to Moore’s Law, followed by slides lamenting how much data we are producing and the resources required to act on it?

Best practices detailed for super-resolution microscopy method

February 12, 2014 11:36 am | News | Comments

A newly published research paper on super-resolution microscopy from the U.K. highlights best practices in a technique called localization microscopy, which uses fluorescent labelling and computer modelling to bypass the diffraction limit. The method described in the freely available paper summarizes the methods used to process captured images using MATLAB scripts.

Trace Early, Trace Often to Improve Your Development Process

February 7, 2014 2:45 pm | by Matt Harp, Product Marketing Director, Seapine Software | Articles | Comments

Many companies have recognized an untapped opportunity for improving their development process: the requirements traceability matrix. Rather than wait until the end of the development cycle, the team builds the trace matrix when requirements first go under design control, and maintains it all the way through the submission process.

Sochi: Our tweeted emotions to be decrypted in real time

February 7, 2014 10:59 am | News | Comments

Via social media, researchers at the Federal Polytechnic Institute of Lausanne (EPFL) will be tracking emotions of the viewing public during the Olympic Games in Sochi. Their goal is to show, in real time, what people are feeling during the competitions. The new software will not only contend with multiple languages and breakneck speed, it will also track dozens of commonly used emoticons.

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How to Transform Your Lab and Business

February 6, 2014 3:15 pm | by Kim Shah, Director of Marketing and New Business Development for the Informatics, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Philadelphia, Pa. | Thermo Fisher Scientific | Articles | Comments

The biggest challenges many elite enterprises face are actually external forces completely out of their control, from geopolitical and economic macro trends to global threats to health and the environment. This lack of control creates a tumultuous global business climate that conspires to unravel even the most well-thought-out strategic plans.

IBM brings Watson to Africa

February 6, 2014 12:32 pm | News | Comments

Named “Project Lucy” after the earliest known human ancestor, IBM’s new 10-year, $100 million initiative will bring the Watson computer and other cognitive systems to Africa in a bid to fuel development and spur business opportunities across the world’s fastest growing continent. Watson, whose design team won an R&D Innovator of the Year Award in 2011, improves itself by learning and quickly accessing big data resources.

Simulating Subsidence from Oil and Gas Extraction

February 6, 2014 10:33 am | by S. Monaco, G. Capasso, S. Mantica, Eni E&P D and Datye, R. Vitali, Dassault Systemes | Articles | Comments

Oil and gas remain primary power sources for both personal and industrial use worldwide. Extraction of these fuel resources from underground reservoirs involves complex geomechanical processes, and can result in subsidence of the ground over a reservoir. Since this occurrence can have an impact on the environment and affect the operability of extraction equipment, it needs to be accurately predicted and kept within safe limits.

Team develops rapid smartphone-based mercury testing and mapping

February 5, 2014 8:59 am | by Matthew Chin, UCLA | News | Comments

A team of engineers from the Univ. of California, Los Angeles has developed a smartphone attachment and application to test water for the presence of mercury, a toxic heavy metal. The new platform could significantly reduce the time and cost of the testing, and it could be particularly useful in regions with limited technological resources.

Integrated computer modeling systems to improve water resource management

February 3, 2014 8:31 am | News | Comments

Water resource management efforts have given rise to several computer models dealing with hydrology, public policy, chemistry and more. Jonathan Goodall, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at the Univ. of Virginia, is working to design an integrated computer modeling system that will seamlessly connect all the different models, enabling everyone involved in the water resources field to see the big picture.

Dassault Systèmes to acquire Accelrys Inc.

January 30, 2014 8:43 am | News | Comments

France-based 3-D design software and product lifecycle management solutions (PLM) company Dassault Systèmes has announced the signing of a definitive merger agreement for Dassault Systèmes to acquire San Diego-based Accelrys, Inc., a leading provider of scientific innovation lifecycle management software for chemistry, biology and materials. The acquisition is valued at approximately $750 million.

Maximizing solar cells

January 22, 2014 11:34 am | News | Comments

As part of his PhD, postdoctoral research fellow Dr. Daniel Tune in Australia has designed a computer modelling system that shows which combination of carbon nanotubes absorb the most sunlight, therefore providing the most energy. In 2011, researchers in the U.S. successfully fabricated a solar cell using carbon nanotubes, but there are more than 70 different types of carbon nanotube that could be used in such solar cells.

Europe launches RoboEarth: “Wikipedia for Robots”

January 17, 2014 8:38 am | by Toby Sterling, Associated Press | News | Comments

Expectations are high for RoboEarth, a new European-funded system to speed the development of human-serving robots. Scientists from five major European technical universities have gathered in the Netherlands this week for its launch and to demonstrate possible applications. The first: the deceptively simple task of delivering a glass of milk to a patient in a mock-up hospital room.

Quantum physics could make secure, single-use computer memories possible

January 15, 2014 3:49 pm | News | Comments

Computer scientist Yi-Kai Liu at NIST has devised a way to make a security device that has proved notoriously difficult to build: a "one-shot" memory unit, whose contents can be read only a single time. The innovation, which uses qubits and conjugate coding, shows in theory how the laws of quantum physics could allow for the construction of such memory devices.

Study: Copycats pave the way to problem-solving success

January 15, 2014 9:07 am | News | Comments

It is often better to be surrounded by copycats than innovators, according to a new Indiana Univ. study that created a virtual problem landscape to explore the advantages and disadvantages of “social learning”. The researchers thought at first it would be better to have innovators around, but in their experiments imitators offered the greater benefit.

Report: NSA maps pathway into computers

January 15, 2014 8:44 am | News | Comments

According to a report from The New York Times, the National Security Agency has implanted software in nearly 100,000 computers around the world that allows the U.S. to conduct surveillance on those machines. The technology, which is not used in the U.S., relies on radio waves that can be transmitted from tiny circuit boards and USB cards inserted covertly into the computers.  

Google builds a “Nest” for future of smart homes

January 15, 2014 8:30 am | by Michael Liedtke, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

When our Internet-connected gadgets and home appliances all learn to talk to each other, Google wants to be at the center of the conversation. This imagined future is still a few years away, but the search giant is already preparing with its $3.2 billion acquisition of high-tech thermostat and smoke-detector maker Nest Labs.

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