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Photo editing tool enables object images to be manipulated in 3-D

August 5, 2014 5:59 pm | News | Comments

Editors of photos routinely resize objects, or move them up, down or sideways, but Carnegie Mellon Univ. researchers are adding an extra dimension to photo editing by enabling editors to turn or flip objects any way they want, even exposing surfaces not visible in the original photograph.

Thomson Reuters launch new analytics platform, InCites

July 31, 2014 11:55 am | News | Comments

An integrated, web-based platform for measuring research output and impact, monitoring trends and benchmarking, InCites is Thomson Reuters’ latest effort to allow users to easily assess and look beyond the global influence of a specific journal to conduct transparent analysis and make better decisions. The expanded assessment solution has been implemented on the 2014 edition of Journal Citation Reports.

Climate change research goes to the extremes

July 30, 2014 11:50 am | by Angela Herring, Northeastern Univ. | News | Comments

By now, most sci­en­tists agree that the tem­per­a­ture of the planet is rising and that the increase is due to human activ­i­ties. But the jury still out regarding the vari­ability of that increase. Researchers using “big data” computational tools have recently taken a systematic approach to answering this question and their results point to both higher global temperatures and increasing variability among those temperature extremes.

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New gadget helps the vision impaired to read graphs

July 29, 2014 10:47 am | News | Comments

An affordable digital reading system invented by researchers in Australia now allows people who are blind to read more than just words. The device works by using pattern recognition technology and other methods on any document to identify images, graphs, maths or text. From here it is then converted to audio format with navigation markup.

Scientists enlist big data to guide conservation efforts

July 18, 2014 12:37 pm | by Robert Sanders, UC Berkeley | News | Comments

“Big data” has yet to make a mark on conservation efforts to preserve the planet’s biodiversity. But that may soon change with a new model developed by Univ. of California, Berkeley, biologist Brent Mishler and his colleagues in Australia. This effort  leverages the growing mass of data to take into account not only the number of species throughout an area, but also the variation among species and their geographic rarity, or endemism.

Virtual crowds produce real behavior insights

July 8, 2014 7:55 pm | Videos | Comments

A Brown Univ. group has developed a wireless virtual reality system to study a phenomenon that scientists don’t yet understand: How pedestrians interact with each other and how those individual behaviors, in turn, generate patterns of crowd movement. The system, which uses motion capture technology can immerse up to four people in a carefully controlled, realistic virtual crowd.

“Deep learning” makes search for exotic particles easier

July 2, 2014 3:12 pm | News | Comments

Fully automated "deep learning" by computers greatly improves the odds of discovering particles such as the Higgs boson, according to a recent study. In fact, this approach beats even veteran physicists' abilities, which now consists of developing mathematical formulas by hand to apply to data. New machine learning methods are rendering that approach unnecessary.

Google to show off smart home gadgets, wearables

June 25, 2014 8:14 am | by Barbara Ortutay, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

An Android update, wearable gadgets, and so-called smart home devices are just some of the innovations Google is likely to show off at its two-day developer conference, which begins today in San Francisco. In recent years, the conference has focused on smartphones and tablets, but this year Google's Android operating system is expected to stretch into cars, homes, and smartwatches.

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Study shows puzzle games can improve mental flexibility

June 24, 2014 10:26 am | News | Comments

Executive functions in your brain are important for making decisions in everyday life when you have to deal with sudden changes in your environment. A recent study by scientists in Singapore showed that adults who played the physics-based puzzle video game Cut the Rope regularly, for as little as an hour a day, had improved executive functions. This marks the first time video games have been shown to deliver such broad improvements.

Supreme Court tosses out software patent

June 19, 2014 11:22 am | by Sam Hananel - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The Supreme Court on Thursday tossed out an Australian company's patent for business software in a closely watched case that clarifies standards for awarding patents. The justices ruled unanimously that the government should not have issued a patent to Alice Corp. in the 1990s because the company simply took an abstract idea that has been around for years and programmed it to run through a computer.

New effort to revolutionize time-keeping for cyber-physical systems

June 16, 2014 10:44 am | News | Comments

The National Science Foundation has announced a five-year, $4 million award to tackle the challenge of synchronizing time in cyber-physical systems, which are systems that integrate sensing, computation, control and networking into physical objects and infrastructure. The grant brings together expertise from five universities to improve the way computers maintain knowledge of time and synchronize it with other networked devices.

New computer program aims to teach itself everything about anything

June 13, 2014 11:11 am | by Michelle Ma, Univ. of Washington | Videos | Comments

Without a specific search term in mind, it can be surprisingly hard to find information on the Internet , or to know how to start searching. To help, computer scientists have created the first fully automated computer program that teaches everything there is to know about any visual concept. Called Learning Everything about Anything (LEVAN), the program searches millions of books and images to learn all possible variations of a concept.

How to Form an Engineering Simulation Plan

June 4, 2014 1:42 pm | by Nicholas M. Veikos, President, CAE Associates Inc., Middlebury, Conn. | Articles | Comments

Upon introducing engineering simulation into an organization, it’s important to formulate an implementation plan. Simply telling the engineering team to “have at it” doesn’t generally lead to positive results. Every plan will be different, but all can benefit from some basic considerations.

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App paired with sensor measures stress and delivers advice to cope in real time

June 4, 2014 12:21 pm | News | Comments

Computer scientists at Microsoft Research and the University of California, San Diego have developed a system, called ParentGuardian, that combines a mobile application and sensor to detect stress in parents. The system, initially tested on parents of children with ADHD, delivers research-based strategies to help decrease stress during emotionally charged interactions with children.

Leaving Paper Behind

June 4, 2014 12:15 pm | by Trish Meek, Director of Product Strategy, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Philadelphia, Pa. | Thermo Fisher Scientific | Articles | Comments

After another year of flat spending in 2013, global investment in R&D is forecast to grow by 3.8% to $1.6 trillion in 2014, according the annual R&D Magazine Global Funding Forecast. In the U.S., federal spending is forecast to increase modestly (1.5%), another promising sign, but it’s fair to say the pressure is still on to do more with less, particularly in Big Pharma where recent R&D cuts have been the most dramatic.

Increasing Productivity and Efficiency in the Lab

June 4, 2014 11:58 am | by Daniela Jansen, PhD, Product Marketing Manager, Dassault Systèmes BIOVIA (formerly Accelrys) | Articles | Comments

Pharmaceutical companies are constantly seeking ways to improve efficiency in order to increase productivity, all while speeding up innovation and protecting intellectual property (IP). The use of mobile applications (apps) in the laboratory has been investigated as a means to achieve these goals. By allowing scientists to move freely around the laboratory, mobile apps add value to suboptimal processes requiring non-value-added steps.

Safety Is Key When Planning for U.S. High-speed Rail Lines

June 4, 2014 11:46 am | by Xavier Fornari, Product Marketing Manager, ANSYS, Elancourt, France | Articles | Comments

High-speed rail is a frequently discussed topic, but one that has yet to become a reality in the U.S. A number of states and regions in the U.S. including Texas, California, the Pacific Northwest and Minnesota, to name a few, have planned projects to bring high-speed rail to fruition.

Retaining Knowledge After an Engineer Leaves

June 4, 2014 11:31 am | by Paul Goossens, VP of Engineering Solutions, Maplesoft | Articles | Comments

If a senior engineer left an organization suddenly, how many hours would it take for the engineering team to take over his projects, confident that they understand not only the designs, but why those designs are the way they are? The typical answer is “far too many”. Widespread use of CAE and data management tools have made this task much easier than before, but these tools do little to record the thinking behind the results.

Proactive approach to detect malicious software in networked computers and data

June 4, 2014 10:12 am | News | Comments

Highlighting the impact of malicious software, Target suffered the largest retail hack in U.S. history during the Christmas shopping season of 2013. To help combat this worsening trend, Virginia Tech computer scientists have used causal relations to determine whether or not network activities have justifiable and legitimate causes to occur. The work effectively isolates infected computer hosts and detects in advance stealthy malware.

Computer scientists develop tool to make the Internet of Things safer

June 3, 2014 9:40 am | by Ioana Patringenaru, Jacobs School of Engineering | News | Comments

Computer scientists at the Univ. of California, San Diego have developed a tool that allows hardware designers and system builders to test security—a first for the field. There is a big push to create the so-called Internet of Things, where all devices are connected and communicate with one another. As a result, embedded systems—small computer systems built around microcontrollers—are becoming more common.

Apple expands into health, home with new software

June 3, 2014 8:20 am | by Michael Liedtke, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

New tools for tracking health and controlling household appliances are part of updated operating systems that Apple unveiled Monday in San Francisco at its 25th annual conference for application developers. The company is expanding into home and health management as the company tries to turn its iPhones, iPads and Mac computers into an interchangeable network of devices that serve as a hub of people's increasingly digital lives.

A robust source of information on marine energy, offshore wind projects

May 22, 2014 8:04 am | by Tom Rickey, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | News | Comments

Wondering what the impact on killer whales might be from a turbine installed under the sea? Curious whether crabs and other crustaceans might be attracted to underwater cables carrying electricity to homes and businesses on the mainland? Interested in which country is harvesting the most energy from the world's oceans? The answers to these and many more lie with Tethys.

Carnegie Mellon, Microsoft Research automate privacy compliance for big data systems

May 21, 2014 1:56 pm | News | Comments

Web services companies make promises about how they will use personal information. But ensuring that millions of lines of code operate in ways consistent with privacy promises is difficult. A team from Carnegie Mellon Univ.and Microsoft Research has shown, however, that these compliance checks can be automated. Their prototype automated system is now running on the data analytics pipeline of Bing, Microsoft's search engine.

ANSYS acquires 3-D modeling company SpaceClaim

May 1, 2014 11:46 am | News | Comments

Engineering simulation software provider ANSYS announced Thursday that it has acquired SpaceClaim Corp. for a purchase price of $85 million in cash. SpaceClaim is a developer of fast, intuitive 3-D direct modeling software for engineers, and has partnered with ANSYS in the past to offer customers ANSYS SpaceClaim Direct Modeler.

Sketching on tablets promising for collaborative design, creativity

April 30, 2014 8:00 am | by Emil Venere, Purdue Univ. | News | Comments

Two new "cyberlearning" platforms allow non-artists to create illustrations rivaling the work of expert designers. The platforms sidestep a key creative barrier by eliminating the need for drawing skills in developing new designs. The platforms represent an important step toward replacing or augmenting the use of paper to create designs.

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