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How to Transform Your Lab and Business

February 6, 2014 3:15 pm | by Kim Shah, Director of Marketing and New Business Development for the Informatics, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Philadelphia, Pa. | Thermo Fisher Scientific | Articles | Comments

The biggest challenges many elite enterprises face are actually external forces completely out of their control, from geopolitical and economic macro trends to global threats to health and the environment. This lack of control creates a tumultuous global business climate that conspires to unravel even the most well-thought-out strategic plans.

IBM brings Watson to Africa

February 6, 2014 12:32 pm | News | Comments

Named “Project Lucy” after the earliest known human ancestor, IBM’s new 10-year, $100 million initiative will bring the Watson computer and other cognitive systems to Africa in a bid to fuel development and spur business opportunities across the world’s fastest growing continent. Watson, whose design team won an R&D Innovator of the Year Award in 2011, improves itself by learning and quickly accessing big data resources.

Simulating Subsidence from Oil and Gas Extraction

February 6, 2014 10:33 am | by S. Monaco, G. Capasso, S. Mantica, Eni E&P D and Datye, R. Vitali, Dassault Systemes | Articles | Comments

Oil and gas remain primary power sources for both personal and industrial use worldwide. Extraction of these fuel resources from underground reservoirs involves complex geomechanical processes, and can result in subsidence of the ground over a reservoir. Since this occurrence can have an impact on the environment and affect the operability of extraction equipment, it needs to be accurately predicted and kept within safe limits.

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Team develops rapid smartphone-based mercury testing and mapping

February 5, 2014 8:59 am | by Matthew Chin, UCLA | News | Comments

A team of engineers from the Univ. of California, Los Angeles has developed a smartphone attachment and application to test water for the presence of mercury, a toxic heavy metal. The new platform could significantly reduce the time and cost of the testing, and it could be particularly useful in regions with limited technological resources.

Integrated computer modeling systems to improve water resource management

February 3, 2014 8:31 am | News | Comments

Water resource management efforts have given rise to several computer models dealing with hydrology, public policy, chemistry and more. Jonathan Goodall, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at the Univ. of Virginia, is working to design an integrated computer modeling system that will seamlessly connect all the different models, enabling everyone involved in the water resources field to see the big picture.

Dassault Systèmes to acquire Accelrys Inc.

January 30, 2014 8:43 am | News | Comments

France-based 3-D design software and product lifecycle management solutions (PLM) company Dassault Systèmes has announced the signing of a definitive merger agreement for Dassault Systèmes to acquire San Diego-based Accelrys, Inc., a leading provider of scientific innovation lifecycle management software for chemistry, biology and materials. The acquisition is valued at approximately $750 million.

Maximizing solar cells

January 22, 2014 11:34 am | News | Comments

As part of his PhD, postdoctoral research fellow Dr. Daniel Tune in Australia has designed a computer modelling system that shows which combination of carbon nanotubes absorb the most sunlight, therefore providing the most energy. In 2011, researchers in the U.S. successfully fabricated a solar cell using carbon nanotubes, but there are more than 70 different types of carbon nanotube that could be used in such solar cells.

Europe launches RoboEarth: “Wikipedia for Robots”

January 17, 2014 8:38 am | by Toby Sterling, Associated Press | News | Comments

Expectations are high for RoboEarth, a new European-funded system to speed the development of human-serving robots. Scientists from five major European technical universities have gathered in the Netherlands this week for its launch and to demonstrate possible applications. The first: the deceptively simple task of delivering a glass of milk to a patient in a mock-up hospital room.

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Quantum physics could make secure, single-use computer memories possible

January 15, 2014 3:49 pm | News | Comments

Computer scientist Yi-Kai Liu at NIST has devised a way to make a security device that has proved notoriously difficult to build: a "one-shot" memory unit, whose contents can be read only a single time. The innovation, which uses qubits and conjugate coding, shows in theory how the laws of quantum physics could allow for the construction of such memory devices.

Study: Copycats pave the way to problem-solving success

January 15, 2014 9:07 am | News | Comments

It is often better to be surrounded by copycats than innovators, according to a new Indiana Univ. study that created a virtual problem landscape to explore the advantages and disadvantages of “social learning”. The researchers thought at first it would be better to have innovators around, but in their experiments imitators offered the greater benefit.

Report: NSA maps pathway into computers

January 15, 2014 8:44 am | News | Comments

According to a report from The New York Times, the National Security Agency has implanted software in nearly 100,000 computers around the world that allows the U.S. to conduct surveillance on those machines. The technology, which is not used in the U.S., relies on radio waves that can be transmitted from tiny circuit boards and USB cards inserted covertly into the computers.  

Google builds a “Nest” for future of smart homes

January 15, 2014 8:30 am | by Michael Liedtke, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

When our Internet-connected gadgets and home appliances all learn to talk to each other, Google wants to be at the center of the conversation. This imagined future is still a few years away, but the search giant is already preparing with its $3.2 billion acquisition of high-tech thermostat and smoke-detector maker Nest Labs.

New patent mapping system helps find innovation pathways

January 14, 2014 2:18 pm | News | Comments

A patent mapping system that considers how patents cite one another may help researchers better understand the relationships between technologies and how they may come together to spur disruptive new areas of innovation. The system, which also categorizes patents in a new way, was produced by a team of researchers from three universities and an Atlanta-based producer of data-mining software.

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New MIT technology allows 3-D image interaction

January 3, 2014 11:00 am | News | Comments

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found a way to allow people in one place to interact with 3-D versions of people or objects in a different location. MIT's Tangible Media Group calls the technology inFORM, and it could one day be used by architects, urban planners, or even doctors who need to look at computed tomography scans.

Report: NSA intercepts computer deliveries

December 30, 2013 9:37 am | by Raphael Satter, Associated Press | News | Comments

A German magazine lifted the lid on the operations of the National Security Agency's hacking unit Sunday, reporting that American spies intercept computer deliveries, exploit hardware vulnerabilities, and even hijack Microsoft's internal reporting system to spy on their targets.

Maybe not sci-fi, but robots readied for big tests

December 16, 2013 2:55 pm | by Geoff Mulvihill and Kevin Begos, Associated Press | News | Comments

The real world has not caught up yet with "Star Wars" and its talking, thinking robots, but some of the most sophisticated units that exist are heading to Florida this week for a Defense Department-sponsored competition. Seventeen humanoid robots will be evaluated Friday and Saturday for how well they can complete tasks including driving an all-terrain vehicle and opening doors.

Machine-learning algorithms could make chemical reactions intelligent

December 12, 2013 5:09 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and Harvard Univ. have have recently shown that an important class of artificial intelligence algorithms could be implemented using chemical reactions. These algorithms use a technique called “message passing inference on factor graphs” and are a mathematical coupling of ideas from graph theory and probability.

Researchers develop algorithm that uses computer vision to identify social groups

December 12, 2013 8:18 am | News | Comments

Hipster, surfer or biker? Computers may soon  be able to tell the difference: Scientists in California are developing an algorithm that uses group pictures to determine to which of these groups, or urban tribes, you belong. So far, the algorithm is 48% accurate on average, much better than chance but not yet to level of humans.

New system allows for high-accuracy, through-wall, 3-D motion tracking

December 11, 2013 12:19 pm | by Abby Abazorius, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Gaming could become much more realistic with new technology developed at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) that permits highly accurate, 3-D motion tracking. The new system, dubbed “WiTrack”, uses radio signals to track a person through walls and obstructions, pinpointing her 3-D location to within 10 to 20 cm, about the width of an adult hand.

SpaceClaim Engineer 2014 launches

December 10, 2013 2:45 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Provider of flexible and affordable 3-D modeling software for engineers, SpaceClaim, has announced the launch of the 2014 edition of SpaceClaim Engineer. The new release maintains the familiar interface and workflow of the prior editions while combining tools for manufacturing, advances in file compatibility, performance speed gains and improved collaboration.

Multiphysics Models Create New Biomedical Information

December 10, 2013 2:30 pm | by Tim Studt | Articles | Comments

Multiphysics software simulations are used by biomedical equipment developers to reliably design complex mechanisms for enhancing the human physical condition. These medical devices can include tools for treating cancers, enhancing hearing and treating chronic back pain.

Accelrys acquires enterprise compliance software company QUMAS

December 10, 2013 1:27 pm | News | Comments

Scientific innovation lifecycle management solutions provider Accelrys has added to its enterprise capabilities with the acquisition of Ireland-based QUMAS for $50 million in cash. QUMAS is a global provider of cloud-based and on-premises enterprise compliance software supporting regulatory and quality operations in life sciences and other highly regulated industries.

Industry Breakout - Information & Communications Technologies

December 9, 2013 6:08 am | by R&D Magazine/Battelle | Articles | Comments

The information and communications technologies (ICT) industry, and the significant level of R&D that supports it, is driven by constant change in consumer preferences, market demand and technological evolution. The ICT industry is the largest private-sector R&D investor in the U.S., performing nearly one-third of the total.

Database tracks toxic side effects of pharmaceuticals

December 5, 2013 9:13 am | News | Comments

Sometimes the cure can be worse than the disease. Pharmaceutical drugs are known for their potential side effects, and an important aspect of personalized medicine is to tailor therapies to individuals to reduce the chances of adverse events. Now researchers from North Carolina State Univ. have updated an extensive toxicology database so that it can be used to track information about therapeutic drugs and their unintentional toxic effects.

Updated healthcare.gov gets mixed reviews

December 3, 2013 6:38 pm | by KELLI KENNEDY - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Counselors helping people use the federal government's online health exchange are giving mixed reviews to the updated site, with some zipping through the application process while others are facing the same old sputters and even crashes. The Obama administration had promised a vastly improved shopping experience on healthcare.gov by the end of November, and this is the first week for users to test the updated site.

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