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Mission possible: Simulation-based training and experimentation on display

December 3, 2013 7:53 am | by Eric Beidel, Office of Naval Research | News | Comments

The Office of Naval Research is demonstrating the Fleet Integrated Synthetic Training/Testing Facility (FIST2FAC) in Florida this week, showing how gaming technology is helping naval forces develop operations strategies in a hassle-free way.

Even if emissions stop, carbon dioxide could warm Earth for centuries

November 25, 2013 8:29 am | by Morgan Kelly, Princeton Univ. | News | Comments

According to recent Princeton Univ.-led research that simulated an emissions-free Earth, the carbon dioxide already in the atmosphere could continue to warm our planet for hundreds of years, even if emission came to a sudden halt. The study suggests that it might take a lot less carbon than previously thought to reach the global temperature scientists deem unsafe.

Researchers simulate electrons in astrophysical plasma jets

November 20, 2013 2:39 pm | News | Comments

In a recent study presented at the Supercomputing Conference SC13 in Denver that may earn them the Gordon Bell Prize, physicists from Germany have simulated the motion of billions of electrons within astrophysical plasma jets and calculated the light they emit. Tracking the movements of nearly a hundred billion particles required the help of a high-performance computer.

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HIV virus spread, evolution studied through computer modeling

November 19, 2013 1:40 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are investigating the complex relationships between the spread of the HIV virus in a population (epidemiology) and the actual, rapid evolution of the virus (phylogenetics) within each patient’s body. The team models the uninfected population using traditional differential equations on the computer; this is done for computational speed, because an agent-based component is much more demanding.

How a metamaterial might improve a depression treatment

October 30, 2013 7:40 am | News | Comments

A brain stimulation technique that is used to treat tough cases of depression could be considerably improved with a new headpiece designed by Univ. of Michigan engineers. Computer simulations showed that the headpiece—a square array of 64 circular metallic coils—could one day help researchers and doctors hit finer targets in the brain that are twice as deep as they can reach today, and without causing pain.

Meteorologists spy clue to heat waves weeks away

October 29, 2013 1:51 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The best prediction meteorologists can accomplish for heat waves is about 10 days. An earlier warning would help cities prepare for the heat wave, arrange to open up cooling centers and check on the elderly. Recent work using statistical data and computer simulations may have revealed a way to predict some killer heat waves up to three weeks in advance.

Simulating Low-Velocity Impact on a Honeycomb Sandwich Panel

October 29, 2013 11:12 am | by David Palmer, SIMULIA, R&D Customer Support | Articles | Comments

Honeycomb sandwich panels, with their high strength-to-weight ratios, have significant advantages over monocoque construction for certain applications. Twin-skinned plates/shells with a honeycomb core are widely used in the aerospace industry for structures such as aircraft fuselages, engine cowlings and impact protection shields.

Hot Box

October 25, 2013 11:11 am | by Matt Richter, R&D Engineer, Agilent Technologies, Santa Rosa, Calif. | Agilent Technologies Inc., ANSYS, Inc. | Articles | Comments

Oscilloscopes display and measure the wave shape of an electrical signal. High-performance oscilloscopes, which are capable of measuring signals at very high frequencies, are primarily used in high-speed applications. Agilent Technologies recently released the Infiniium 90000 Q-Series oscilloscope, which is the world’s highest bandwidth commercially available real-time oscilloscope and the first to reach the 60-GHz barrier.

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Modeling Processes Depends on Your Application

October 25, 2013 11:05 am | by Tim Studt | COMSOL, Inc. | Articles | Comments

The modeling and simulation of various manufacturing processes is important because, in many cases, it’s impractical or even impossible to measure the specific operating parameters involved that contribute to the resulting products. This is particularly true in high-temperature processes like blast furnaces or the welding of large metal structures such as those used in shipbuilding and reactor vessels.

New research validates theory on quantum magnetic ordering in materials

October 22, 2013 9:19 am | News | Comments

A new study set out to use numerical simulations to validate previous theoretical predictions describing materials exhibiting so-called antiferromagneting characteristics. A recently discovered theory shows that the ordering temperature depends on two factors—namely the spin-wave velocity and the staggered magnetization. The simulations match these theoretical predictions.

A toolbox to simulate the Big Bang and beyond

October 18, 2013 10:34 am | News | Comments

The universe is a vast and mysterious place, but thanks to high-performance computing technology scientists around the world are beginning to understand it better. They are using supercomputers to simulate how the Big Bang generated the seeds that led to the formation of galaxies such as the Milky Way.

Without plants, Earth would cook under billions of tons of additional carbon

October 16, 2013 2:19 pm | by Morgan Kelly, Princeton Univ. | News | Comments

Enhanced growth of Earth's leafy greens during the 20th century has significantly slowed the planet's transition to being red-hot, according to the first study to specify the extent to which plants have prevented climate change since pre-industrial times. Researchers have found that land ecosystems have kept the planet cooler by absorbing billions of tons of carbon, especially during the past 60 years.

COMSOL Conference 2013 Boston

October 1, 2013 5:24 pm | Events

Multiphysics software developer COMSOL is holding its COMSOL Conference Oct. 9-11 at the Boston Marriott Newton. The event will draw together engineers, scientists and researchers to learn from the leaders in multiphysics  simulation and discover the latest tools from COMSOL.

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Clot busting simulations test potential stroke treatment

September 25, 2013 8:02 am | News | Comments

Researchers are using computer simulations to investigate how ultrasound and tiny bubbles injected into the bloodstream might break up blood clots, limiting the damage caused by a stroke in its first hours. Strokes are the most common cause of long-term disability in the U.S. and the third most common cause of death.

Supercomputing the transition from ordinary to extraordinary forms of matter

September 18, 2013 8:15 am | News | Comments

To get a better understanding of the subatomic soup that filled the early universe, and how it “froze out” to form the atoms of today’s world, scientists are taking a closer look at the nuclear phase diagram. Like a map that describes how the physical state of water morphs from solid ice to liquid to steam with changes in temperature and pressure, the nuclear phase diagram maps out different phases of the components of atomic nuclei.

Research determines best arrangement of tidal sails device

September 17, 2013 1:09 pm | News | Comments

Just as wind turbines tap into the energy of flowing air to generate electricity, hydrokinetic devices produce power from moving masses of water. Engineers in Spain have performed a computer simulation to determine the optimal configuration of a system produced by a Norwegian company to enable it to extract the maximum amount of energy from any given current.

Artificial “lung” removes carbon dioxide from smokestack

September 9, 2013 10:42 am | News | Comments

The amazingly efficient lungs of birds and the swim bladders of fish have become the inspiration for a new filtering system to remove carbon dioxide from electric power station smokestacks before the main greenhouse gas can billow into the atmosphere and contribute to global climate change. A report on the new technology was presented Monday at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Computer model to help design flexible touchscreens

September 4, 2013 7:33 am | News | Comments

Electronic devices with touchscreens rely on transparent conductors made of indium tin oxide, or ITO. But cost and the physical limitations of this material are limiting progress in developing flexible touchscreens. A research collaboration between the Univ. of Pennsylvania and Duke Univ. is exploring the use of nanowires to replace ITO, and are using simulation tools to determine how they might work.

Team will dive deep into cell structures

August 26, 2013 7:49 am | News | Comments

Researchers at Rice Univ. and the Univ. of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have received a $1.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to create processes that will look more deeply than ever into the protein networks that drive cells. The four-year grant will enable a collaboration on new ways to see and evaluate the mechanisms that give cells their shapes and prompt them to change and move.

Computer simulations indicate calcium carbonate has a dense liquid phase

August 23, 2013 7:51 am | News | Comments

Computer simulations conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory could help scientists make sense of a recently observed and puzzling wrinkle in one of nature’s most important chemical processes. It turns out that calcium carbonate may momentarily exist in liquid form as it crystallizes from solution.

Researchers examine dynamics of nanoscale liquid metal particles

August 15, 2013 2:31 pm | News | Comments

The evolution of fluid drops deposited on solid substrates has been a focus of large research effort for decades, and most recently it has focused on nanoscale properties. Two New Jersey Institute of Technology researchers are the first to demonstrate that simulations based on continuum fluid mechanics can explain the nanoscale dynamics of liquid metal particles on a substrate.

Computer simulations reveal universal increase in electrical conductivity

August 12, 2013 9:16 am | News | Comments

A recent study in the U.K. investigated the electrical conductivity of a solid electrolyte, a system of positive and negative atoms on a crystal lattice. Computer simulations performed using this model have revealed how the electrical conductivity of many materials increases with a strong electrical field in a universal way. The discovery could significant implications for future materials and chemistry research.

Virtual control room helps nuclear operators, industry

August 8, 2013 11:37 am | News | Comments

A new facility at Idaho National Laboratory is helping nuclear power plant operators like Duke Energy embark on an upgrade projects for their control rooms. The new Human System Simulation Laboratory (HSSL) is a full-scale virtual nuclear control room that can test the safety and reliability of proposed technology replacements before they are implemented in commercial nuclear control rooms.

Simulating Sensors and Detectors

August 5, 2013 12:53 pm | by Tim Studt | Articles | Comments

One of the major driving forces for developing new sensors and detectors is in medical applications. This includes the integration of fiber optic sensors, smart sensors, silicon micromachined sensors and thin-film devices. Smart sensors are devices that incorporate electronic logic, control or signal processing functions and therefore offer enhanced measurement capabilities, information quality and functional performance.

Engineers gain insight into turbulence formation and evolution in fluids

July 31, 2013 5:19 pm | by Katie Neith, Caltech | News | Comments

Wall turbulence develops when fluids—liquid or gas—flow past solid surfaces at anything but the slowest flow rates. Progress in understanding and controlling wall turbulence has been somewhat incremental because of the massive range of scales of motion involved, but recently engineers in the U.S. and the U.K. have developed a new and improved way of looking at the composition of turbulence near walls.

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