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A robust source of information on marine energy, offshore wind projects

May 22, 2014 8:04 am | by Tom Rickey, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | News | Comments

Wondering what the impact on killer whales might be from a turbine installed under the sea? Curious whether crabs and other crustaceans might be attracted to underwater cables carrying electricity to homes and businesses on the mainland? Interested in which country is harvesting the most energy from the world's oceans? The answers to these and many more lie with Tethys.

The doctor’s in … through webcam, smartphone

May 13, 2014 7:49 am | News | Comments

Welcome to the virtual house call, the latest twist on telemedicine. It's increasingly getting attention as a way to conveniently diagnose simple maladies, such as whether that runny nose and cough is a cold or the flu. One company even offers a smartphone app that connects to a doctor. Patient groups and technology advocates are now pushing to expand this approach digital care to people with complex chronic diseases.

After slamming Google, Microsoft admits spying

March 21, 2014 12:41 pm | by Associated Press, Ryan Nakashima | News | Comments

Microsoft Corp., which has skewered rival Google Inc. for going through customer emails to deliver ads, has acknowledged that it searched emails in a blogger's Hotmail account to track down who was leaking company secrets. John Frank, deputy general counsel for Microsoft, which owns Hotmail, says in a statement that the software company "took extraordinary actions in this case."

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Obama unleashing power of data on climate change

March 19, 2014 8:47 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The White House on Wednesday announced an initiative to provide private companies and local governments better access to already public climate data. The idea is that with this localized data they can help the public understand the risks they face, especially in coastal areas. The government also is working with Google, Microsoft and Intel, to come up with tools to make communities more resilient in dealing with weather extremes.

Google cameras take rafting trip at Grand Canyon

March 14, 2014 10:03 am | by Felicia Fonseca, Associated Press | News | Comments

The 360-degree views of the Grand Canyon that went live Thursday in Google's Street View map option once were reserved largely for rafters who were lucky enough to board a private trip through the remote canyon, or those willing to pay big bucks to navigate its whitewater rapids. But a partnership with the advocacy group American Rivers has allowed to Google to take its all-seeing eyes down nearly 300 miles of rich geologic history.

Inventor of Web calls for digital bill of rights

March 12, 2014 8:50 am | Videos | Comments

The World Wide Web marks its 25th anniversary this year. On Wednesday, its inventor, Tim Berners-Lee, commented about the state of the Internet and about the need to defend principles that have made the Web successful. Named an R&D Scientist of the Year in 1996, Berners-Lee has been a long-time proponent of openness and neutrality on the Web.

U.S. network to scan workers with secret clearances

March 10, 2014 9:49 am | by Stephen Braun, Associated Press | News | Comments

Intelligence officials are planning a sweeping system of electronic monitoring that would tap into government, financial and other databases to scan the behavior of many of the 5 million federal employees with secret clearances. The system is intended to identify rogue agents, corrupt officials and leakers, in part to prevent cases similar to former National Security Agency analyst Edward Snowden.

Revamping R&D: The New Laboratory In Your Pocket?

March 10, 2014 9:06 am | by Paul Denny-Gouldson, Vice President, Solution Strategy, IDBS | Articles | Comments

The nature of science shares striking similarities across many industry verticals. Whether it’s biologics, chemicals or new product formulations, they are all performed with a high degree of similarity from company to company. This is exemplified by the fact that R&D informatics platforms such as LIMS, ELNs and SDMS are used, and provide real benefits in all science-related sectors.

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Promise and peril in an ultra-connected world

March 3, 2014 11:41 am | by Anick Jesdanun, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

We're in the beginning of a world in which everything is connected to the Internet and with one another, while powerful yet relatively cheap computers analyze all that data for ways to improve lives. At least that's the vision presented this past week at the Mobile World Congress wireless show in Barcelona, Spain, and some of that vision is already available or promised by the end of the year.

Push for Web addresses in era of search, apps

February 28, 2014 4:32 pm | by Anick Jesdanun, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

In the early days, you typed in a domain name address to reach a website. Then came the ability to reach websites directly through a search engine. The mobile era brought us phone apps for accessing services without either. Why bother in this mobile-heavy era? Yet the organization in charge of Internet addresses is pushing a major expansion in domain name suffixes, and at least 160 suffixes have been added since October.

Push for Web addresses in era of search, apps

February 28, 2014 4:32 pm | by Anick Jesdanun, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

In the early days, you typed in a domain name address to reach a website. Then came the ability to reach websites directly through a search engine. The mobile era brought us phone apps for accessing services without either. Why bother in this mobile-heavy era? Yet the organization in charge of Internet addresses is pushing a major expansion in domain name suffixes, and at least 160 suffixes have been added since October.

Project to ensure “what you see is what you send”

February 25, 2014 4:43 pm | News | Comments

Imagine a user who intends to send $2 to a friend through PayPal. Embedded malware in the user’s laptop, however, converts the $2 transaction into a $2,000 transfer to the account of the malware author instead. Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology have created a prototype software, Gyrus, that takes steps to prevent malware from sending spam emails and instant messages, and blocking unauthorized commands such as money transfers.

New record set for data-transfer speeds

February 25, 2014 1:31 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at IBM have set a new record for data transmission over a multimode optical fiber, a type of cable that is typically used to connect nearby computers within a single building or on a campus. The data was sent at a rate of 64 Gb/s over a cable 57-m long using a type of laser called a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser. This rate is 2.5 times faster than the capabilities of today's typical commercial technology.

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A new laser for a faster Internet

February 20, 2014 8:16 am | by Jessica Stoller-Conrad, Caltech | News | Comments

A new laser developed by a research group at Caltech holds the potential to increase by orders of magnitude the rate of data transmission in the optical-fiber network: the backbone of the Internet. The high-coherence new laser converts current to light using III-V material, but in a fundamental departure from S-DFB lasers, it stores the light in a layer of silicon, which does not absorb light.

Engineers in Korea develop head-mounted display with augmented reality chip

February 18, 2014 11:15 am | News | Comments

Researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have made a low-powered, high-speed, head-mounted display device they are calling K-Glass. This wearable electronic display has an augmented reality processor that enables users to do things like browse the menu, food and available tables of a restaurant simply by walking up to it and looking at its name.

Computer whizzes brainstorm for cash at hackathons

February 18, 2014 10:42 am | by Martha Mendoza, AP National Writer | News | Comments

Computer programming competitions known as "hackathons" have spread like viruses in recent years as ways for geeks, nerds and designers to get together to eat pizza, lose sleep and create something new. The marathon brainstorming sessions are focused on everything from developing apps to using computer code to solve the world's problems. This year a record 1,500 hackathons are planned around the globe, up from just a handful in 2010.

NJIT visualizes impact of electrical engineering on society

February 14, 2014 11:37 am | News | Comments

For aspiring electrical engineers, New Jersey Institute of Technology has pulled together in one “tall” infographic a brief history of the breakthroughs and impact of electrical engineering advances since the 1830s, when the telegraph marked the first time that electric currents were used to transmit messages. Since then, electrical devices have a dramatic effect on our daily lives.

Sochi: Our tweeted emotions to be decrypted in real time

February 7, 2014 10:59 am | News | Comments

Via social media, researchers at the Federal Polytechnic Institute of Lausanne (EPFL) will be tracking emotions of the viewing public during the Olympic Games in Sochi. Their goal is to show, in real time, what people are feeling during the competitions. The new software will not only contend with multiple languages and breakneck speed, it will also track dozens of commonly used emoticons.

IBM brings Watson to Africa

February 6, 2014 12:32 pm | News | Comments

Named “Project Lucy” after the earliest known human ancestor, IBM’s new 10-year, $100 million initiative will bring the Watson computer and other cognitive systems to Africa in a bid to fuel development and spur business opportunities across the world’s fastest growing continent. Watson, whose design team won an R&D Innovator of the Year Award in 2011, improves itself by learning and quickly accessing big data resources.

World temperature records available via Google Earth

February 5, 2014 1:04 pm | News | Comments

Climate researchers in the U.K. have made the world's temperature records available via Google Earth. The new format allows users to scroll around the world, zoom in on 6,000 weather stations, and view monthly, seasonal and annual temperature data more easily than ever before. Users can drill down to see some 20,000 graphs—some of which show temperature records dating back to 1850.

Google hopes designer frames will sharpen Glass

January 28, 2014 9:27 am | by Barbara Ortutay, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Google is adding prescription frames and new styles of detachable sunglasses to its computerized, Internet-connected goggles known as Glass. The move comes as Google Inc. prepares to make Glass available to the general population later this year. Glass hasn't actually had glasses in its frame until now.

Study: Biological donors should have access to own biobank data

January 24, 2014 11:54 am | News | Comments

Databanks containing information and biological materials from individuals are a crucial resource for research, but they are currently accessible only to researchers. In a recent paper published in Science, experts say that donors should have unrestricted access to data derived from their own material and that advanced technology means allowing such access is today a question of will rather than feasibility.

Europe launches RoboEarth: “Wikipedia for Robots”

January 17, 2014 8:38 am | by Toby Sterling, Associated Press | News | Comments

Expectations are high for RoboEarth, a new European-funded system to speed the development of human-serving robots. Scientists from five major European technical universities have gathered in the Netherlands this week for its launch and to demonstrate possible applications. The first: the deceptively simple task of delivering a glass of milk to a patient in a mock-up hospital room.

Cloud computing system can reduce carbon emissions

January 15, 2014 10:12 am | News | Comments

Computer scientists at Trinity College Dublin and IBM Dublin have made a significant advance that will allow companies to reduce associated greenhouse gas emissions, drive down costs and minimize network delays depending on their wishes. The scientists have dubbed their new system “Stratus”. Using mathematical algorithms, Stratus effectively balances the load between different computer servers located across the globe.

Report: NSA maps pathway into computers

January 15, 2014 8:44 am | News | Comments

According to a report from The New York Times, the National Security Agency has implanted software in nearly 100,000 computers around the world that allows the U.S. to conduct surveillance on those machines. The technology, which is not used in the U.S., relies on radio waves that can be transmitted from tiny circuit boards and USB cards inserted covertly into the computers.  

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