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Columbia engineers make world's smallest FM radio transmitter

November 18, 2013 9:29 am | News | Comments

A team of scientists have demonstrated new application of graphene using positive feedback. Using graphene’s electrical conduction, Columbia Univ. engineers have created a nano-mechanical system that can create FM signals. It is, in effect, the world's smallest FM radio transmitter.

South Africa cemeteries to microchip tombstones

November 15, 2013 11:13 am | by Carley Petesch, Associated Press | News | Comments

Amid a rash of tombstone thefts from cemeteries in Johannesburg, a company will be offering relatives of the deceased a high-tech solution: microchips that can be inserted into the memorial that will sound an alarm and send a text message to their cell phones if it is disturbed.

Completing the circuit

November 14, 2013 8:34 am | News | Comments

It may sound like chasing rainbows: Detecting flashes of light and energy that are invisible to the human eye and last only for a trillionth of an eye-blink. These flashes hold clues to the nature of exotic subatomic particles, important biological proteins and massive space objects alike.To reveal new details about science at these extremes, a team of scientists is designing intricate signal-processing chips known as ASICs.

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Study: Your brain sees things you don’t

November 14, 2013 7:28 am | by Shelley Littin, Univ. of Arizona | News | Comments

A new study by Univ. of Arizona doctoral student Jay Sanguinetti indicates that our brains perceive objects in everyday life of which we may never be aware. The finding challenges currently accepted models about how the brain processes visual information.

New way to dissolve semiconductors holds promise for electronics industry

November 13, 2013 10:26 am | News | Comments

Semiconductors, the foundation of modern electronics used in flatscreen televisions and fighter jets, could become even more versatile as researchers make headway on a novel, inexpensive way to turn them into thin films. Their report on a new liquid that can quickly dissolve nine types of key semiconductors appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Riding an electron wave into the future of microchip fabrication

November 12, 2013 7:11 pm | News | Comments

A recently developed plasma-based chip fabrication technique affords chip makers unprecedented control of plasma thanks to a population of suprathermal electrons. This is critical to modern microchip fabrication, but how the beam electrons transform themselves into this suprathermal population has been a puzzle. New computer simulations reveal how intense plasma waves generate suprathermal electrons.

Georgia Tech launches new robotics institute

November 8, 2013 7:00 am | News | Comments

The Georgia Institute of Technology has announced the launch of its Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (IRM), the newest of Georgia Tech’s 10 Interdisciplinary Research Institutes. IRIM brings together robotics researchers from across campus—spanning colleges, departments and individual labs—to support and connect research initiatives, enhance educational programs and foster advances for the National Robotics Initiative.

Self-correcting crystal may unleash next generation of advanced communications

November 6, 2013 11:17 am | News | Comments

Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have joined with an international team to engineer and measure a potentially important new class of nanostructured materials for microwave and advanced communication devices.

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Driver monitoring systems extend beyond luxury nameplates

November 5, 2013 4:01 pm | News | Comments

A new market study forecasts that the global market for driver monitoring systems will reach 64.8 million units by the end of 2020 with the majority of shipments being accounted for in vehicles sold in the Asia-Pacific region. A major 2013 is that these systems are migrating from the luxury brands like Volvo and Mercedes-Benz to more mass market models.

Synaptic transistor learns while it computes

November 4, 2013 2:07 pm | News | Comments

Our brains have upwards of 86 billion neurons, connected by synapses that not only complete myriad logic circuits; they continuously adapt to stimuli, strengthening some connections while weakening others. Materials scientists have now created a new type of transistor that mimics the behavior of a synapse. The novel device simultaneously modulates the flow of information in a circuit and physically adapts to changing signals.

Acoustic diode may lead to brighter, clearer ultrasound images

November 1, 2013 11:47 am | News | Comments

Most people know about ultrasound through its role in prenatal imaging: those grainy, grey outlines of junior constructed from reflected sound waves. A new technology called an "acoustic diode” that would transmit sound in one direction may dramatically improve future ultrasound images by changing the way sound waves are transmitted.

Smartwatches abound. But who really wants one?

October 30, 2013 9:00 am | by Anick Jesdanun, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

If consumer electronics companies are to be believed, someone on your holiday shopping list is just dying for a wristwatch that displays message alerts and weather updates. Samsung and Sony have them, Google and Apple are rumored to be developing them. But some experts say it's a product in search of a market, and an expensive one at that.

Electronic Test Moves Labs Forward

October 25, 2013 11:39 am | by Lindsay Hock, Managing Editor | Articles | Comments

Today, users of electronic test instrumentation strive to get their products to market quickly as design and development cycles are becoming shorter. They require consistency in their test strategy, yet flexibility in form factor. Current electronic test instrumentation vendors demonstrate this by offering a diversity of test products that leverage common test functionalities.

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Patent shows Samsung's rival to Google Glass

October 25, 2013 11:24 am | by Youkyung Lee, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

A patent filing shows Samsung Electronics Co. is working on a device it calls sports glasses in a possible response to Google's Internet-connected eyewear. A design patent filing at the Korean Intellectual Property Office shows a Samsung design for smartphone-connected glasses that can display information from the handset.

Researchers advance scheme to design seamless integrated circuits etched on graphene

October 23, 2013 8:05 am | News | Comments

Researchers in electrical and computer engineering at the Univ. of California, Santa Barbara have introduced and modeled an integrated circuit design scheme in which transistors and interconnects are monolithically patterned seamlessly on a sheet of graphene. The demonstration offers possibilities for ultra-energy-efficient, flexible and transparent electronics.

Atomically thin device promises new class of electronics

October 22, 2013 8:05 am | News | Comments

As electronics approach the atomic scale, researchers are increasingly successful at developing atomically thin, virtually 2-D materials that could usher in the next generation of computing. Integrating these materials to create necessary circuits, however, has remained a challenge. Northwestern Univ. researchers have now taken a significant step toward fabricating complex nanoscale electronics.

Giga-year storage medium could outlive human race

October 17, 2013 2:14 pm | News | Comments

Although the amount of data that can be stored has increased immensely during the past few decades, it is still difficult to actually store data for a long period of time. A researcher has recently demonstrated a way to store data for extremely long periods, even millions of years, using an etched wafer made of tungsten encapsulated by silicon nitride. The material is resistant to both time and elevated temperatures.

Software uses cyborg swarm to map unknown environs

October 16, 2013 8:19 am | News | Comments

Researchers have developed software that allows them to map unknown environments based on the movement of a swarm of insect cyborgs, or “biobots.” The software would also allow public safety officials to determine the location of radioactive or chemical threats, if the biobots have been equipped with the relevant sensors.

Researchers evaluate electronic flight bags for Air National Guard pilots

October 16, 2013 8:06 am | News | Comments

When pilots encounter an in-flight emergency they consult with manuals, emergency procedures and other reference materials contained in their flight bags for information on how to respond. In the future, these cumbersome flight bags could be replaced by “electronic flight bags” consisting of a lightweight tablet computer loaded with electronic versions of documents that today are printed on paper.

New multi-touch sensor is customizable with scissors

October 15, 2013 2:37 pm | News | Comments

People often customize the size and shape of materials like textiles and wood without turning to specialists like tailors or carpenters. In the future this should be possible with electronics, according to computer scientists who have developed a printable multi-touch sensor whose shape and size can be altered by anybody.

Scientists rig hospital-grade lightweight blood flow imager on the cheap

September 27, 2013 10:16 am | News | Comments

Tracking blood flow in the laboratory is an important tool for studying ailments and is usually measured in the clinic using professional imaging equipment and techniques like laser speckle contrast imaging. Now, developers have built a new biological imaging system 50 times less expensive than standard equipment, and suitable for imaging applications outside of the laboratory.

Spirals of light may lead to better electronics

September 26, 2013 8:10 am | News | Comments

A group of researchers at Caltech has created the optical equivalent of a tuning fork: a device that can help steady the electrical currents needed to power high-end electronics and stabilize the signals of high-quality lasers. The work marks the first time that such a device has been miniaturized to fit on a chip and may pave the way to improvements in high-speed communications, navigation and remote sensing.

“PhytoBot” captures plants growth in unprecedented detail

September 19, 2013 10:19 am | News | Comments

Watching a plant grow and develop roots can be a long and tiresome process, but watching this process closely can reveal what happens to a genetically modified organism. A recently developed system from IntelLiDrives and the Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison uses robotic cameras and computerized motion control systems to make this process easier.

Graphene photodetector integrated into computer chip

September 16, 2013 12:34 pm | News | Comments

A recent study from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology describing how graphene can be used to convert signals from optical to electrical has also been explored by engineers in Austria, who have also constructed a graphene light detector on a semiconductor chip. According to the researchers, graphene can convert all light wavelengths which are used in telecommunications.

Magnetic semiconductor material holds promise for “spintronics”

September 11, 2013 7:36 am | News | Comments

Researchers at North Carolina State Univ. have created a new compound, strontium tin oxide (Sr3SnO) that can be integrated into silicon chips and is a dilute magnetic semiconductor, meaning that it could be used to make “spintronic” devices, which rely on magnetic force to operate, rather than electrical currents.

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