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X-ray laser shed new light on quest for faster data storage

March 7, 2014 8:27 am | by Glenn Roberts Jr., SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory | News | Comments

An experiment at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory’s x-ray laser has revealed the first atomic-scale details of a new technique that could point the way to faster data storage in smartphones, laptops and other devices. Researchers used pulses of specially tuned light to change the magnetic properties of a material with potential for data storage.

Squeezing light into metals

March 7, 2014 7:50 am | News | Comments

Using an inexpensive inkjet printer, Univ. of Utah electrical engineers produced microscopic structures that use light in metals to carry information. This new technique, which controls electrical conductivity within such microstructures, could be used to rapidly fabricate superfast components in electronic devices, make wireless technology faster or print magnetic materials.

Measuring wind turbines remotely

March 5, 2014 2:57 pm | News | Comments

The rotor and mast of a wind turbine can oscillate and this plays a big role in equipment development and maintenance. Up to now, this analysis has only been possible at discrete points located directly on equipment. Engineers are now using modern information technology to remotely measure the oscillatory pattern over the entire structure of the facility from several hundred meters away.

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A complete medical check-up on a chip

March 4, 2014 3:56 pm | News | Comments

About the size of a stapler, this new handheld device developed in Switzerland is able to test a large number of proteins in our body all at once. This optical “lab on a chip” is compact and inexpensive, and it could offer the possibility of quickly analyzing up to 170,000 different molecules in a blood sample.

Apple's iPhone becoming more compatible with cars

March 3, 2014 4:20 pm | by Michael Liedtke - AP Business Writers - Associated Press | News | Comments

Apple is accelerating the race to make smartphone applications easier and safer to use in cars. Ferrari, Mercedes-Benz and Volvo are previewing Apple's iPhone technology for cars this week at an auto show in Geneva. The partnerships give Apple an early lead over Google's loosely knit family of Android phones.

Promise and peril in an ultra-connected world

March 3, 2014 11:41 am | by Anick Jesdanun, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

We're in the beginning of a world in which everything is connected to the Internet and with one another, while powerful yet relatively cheap computers analyze all that data for ways to improve lives. At least that's the vision presented this past week at the Mobile World Congress wireless show in Barcelona, Spain, and some of that vision is already available or promised by the end of the year.

Smartphone cameras step closer to high-end power

February 27, 2014 4:52 pm | by Youkyung Lee, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Samsung Electronics Co. has beefed up the camera in its Galaxy S5 smartphone due for April release and added smarter camera software, following Sony and Nokia in their upgrades of handset cameras. The tweaks mean smartphone photos, ubiquitous nowadays because of social media such as Facebook and Twitter, will be closer in quality to images captured by digital single-lens reflex cameras, also known as DSLR.

Battery-free tech brings gesture recognition to all devices

February 27, 2014 12:56 pm | by Michelle Ma, Univ. of Washington | Videos | Comments

Univ. of Washington computer scientists have built a low-cost gesture recognition system that runs without batteries and lets users control their electronic devices hidden from sight with simple hand movements. The prototype, called “AllSee,” uses existing TV signals as both a power source and the means for detecting a user’s gesture command.

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Noting tech needs, mining companies seek graphite

February 27, 2014 6:18 am | by Dan Joling - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Tear apart an electric car's rechargeable battery and you'll find a mineral normally associated with No. 2 pencils. It's graphite. And experts say the promise of expanded uses for "pencil lead" in lithium-ion batteries, as well as a decrease in supply from China, has helped touch off the largest wave of mining projects in decades.

Nanoparticle networks' design enhanced by theory

February 26, 2014 5:22 pm | by Anne Ju, Cornell Univ. | News | Comments

Cornell Univ. researchers have recently led what is probably the most comprehensive study to date of block copolymer nanoparticle self-assembly processes. The work is important, because using polymers to self-assemble inorganic nanoparticles into porous structures could revolutionize electronics.

Want your computer to go faster? Just add light

February 25, 2014 1:26 pm | by Angela Herring, Northeastern Univ. | News | Comments

Last year, a physicist and a mechanical engineer at Northeastern Univ. com­bined their expertise to integrate electronic and optical properties on a single electronic chip, enabling them to switch electrically using light alone. Now, they have built three new devices that implement this fast technology: an AND-gate, an OR-gate and a camera-like sensor made of 250,000 miniature devices.

Want your computer to go faster? Just add light

February 25, 2014 1:14 pm | by Angela Herring, Northeastern Univ. | News | Comments

Every second, your com­puter must process bil­lions of com­pu­ta­tional steps to pro­duce even the sim­plest out­puts. Imagine if every one of those steps could be made just a tiny bit more effi­cient. A Northeastern Univ. team has devel­oped a series of novel devices that do just that. The team combined their expertise to unearth a phys­ical phe­nom­enon that could usher in a new wave of highly efficient electronics.

On the road to Mottronics

February 25, 2014 8:38 am | by Lynn Yarris, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Mottronics is a term seemingly destined to become familiar to aficionados of electronic gadgets. Named for the Nobel laureate Nevill Francis Mott, Mottronics involve materials that can be induced to transition between electrically conductive and insulating phases. If these phase transitions can be controlled, Mott materials hold promise for future transistors and memories that feature higher energy efficiencies and faster switching speeds.

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Phone makers look to emerging markets for growth

February 25, 2014 8:08 am | by Anick Jesdanun - AP Technology Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Here's the rub for companies: A good part of the key markets they serve already own smartphones and use them to connect various Internet services. How do you grow from there? Companies from Facebook to Firefox are looking to emerging markets for the next few billion people. They are not only targeting the obvious high-population countries...

Building artificial cells will be a noisy business

February 24, 2014 8:09 am | by Cynthia Eller, California Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Engineers like to make things that work. And if one wants to make something work using nanoscale components, the size of proteins, antibodies and viruses, mimicking the behavior of cells is a good place to start since cells carry an enormous amount of information in a very tiny packet.

Vibration energy the secret to self-powered electronics

February 21, 2014 7:24 am | News | Comments

A multi-university team of engineers has developed what could be a promising solution for charging smartphone batteries on the go, without the need for an electrical cord. Incorporated directly into a cell phone housing, the team's nanogenerator could harvest and convert vibration energy from a surface, such as the passenger seat of a moving vehicle, into power for the phone.

NIST atomtronic study may pave the way for new devices

February 20, 2014 9:04 am | News | Comments

While pursuing the goal of turning a cloud of ultracold atoms into a completely new kind of circuit element, physicists at NIST have demonstrated that such a cloud, known as a Bose-Einstein condensate, can display a sort of "memory." The findings pave the way for a host of novel devices based on "atomtronics," an emerging field that offers an alternative to conventional electronics.

A stretchable highway for light

February 20, 2014 2:53 am | News | Comments

A team of Belgian researchers have made what may be the first optical circuit that uses interconnections that are not only bendable, but also stretchable. These new interconnections, made of a rubbery transparent material called PDMS, guide light along their path even when stretched up to 30% and when bent around an object the diameter of a human finger.

Using holograms to improve electronic devices

February 19, 2014 3:02 pm | by Sean Nealon, Univ. of California, Riverside | News | Comments

A team of researchers has demonstrated a new type of holographic memory device that could provide unprecedented data storage capacity and data processing capabilities in electronic devices. The new type of memory device uses spin waves, a collective oscillation of spins in magnetic materials, instead of the optical beams.

Silicon-germanium chip sets new speed record

February 19, 2014 2:42 pm | by Rick Robinson, Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

A research collaboration consisting of IHP-Innovations for High Performance Microelectronics in Germany and the Georgia Institute of Technology has demonstrated the world's fastest silicon-based device to date. The investigators operated a silicon-germanium (SiGe) transistor at 798 GHz fMAX, exceeding the previous speed record for silicon-germanium chips by about 200 GHz.

Controlling magnetism with an electric field

February 19, 2014 8:16 am | by Marie Guma-Diaz and Annette Gallagher UM News | News | Comments

There is a big effort in industry to produce electrical devices with more and faster memory and logic. Magnetic memory elements, such as in a hard drive, and in the future in what is called MRAM (magnetic random access memory), use electrical currents to encode information. However, the heat which is generated is a significant problem, since it limits the density of devices and hence the performance of computer chips.

Smarter caching

February 19, 2014 7:32 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Computer chips keep getting faster because transistors keep getting smaller. But the chips themselves are as big as ever, so data moving around the chip, and between chips and main memory, has to travel just as far. As transistors get faster, the cost of moving data becomes, proportionally, a more severe limitation. So far, chip designers have circumvented that limitation through the use of “caches”.

Engineers in Korea develop head-mounted display with augmented reality chip

February 18, 2014 11:15 am | News | Comments

Researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have made a low-powered, high-speed, head-mounted display device they are calling K-Glass. This wearable electronic display has an augmented reality processor that enables users to do things like browse the menu, food and available tables of a restaurant simply by walking up to it and looking at its name.

Researchers build world’s most powerful terahertz laser chip

February 18, 2014 10:08 am | News | Comments

One of the main challenges for engineers trying to make practical terahertz wave devices is making the lasers powerful and compact enough to be useful. Engineers in the U.K. have reported their new quantum cascade terahertz laser exceeds 1 W output power. The new record more than doubles landmarks set by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and subsequently by a team from Vienna last year.

NJIT visualizes impact of electrical engineering on society

February 14, 2014 11:37 am | News | Comments

For aspiring electrical engineers, New Jersey Institute of Technology has pulled together in one “tall” infographic a brief history of the breakthroughs and impact of electrical engineering advances since the 1830s, when the telegraph marked the first time that electric currents were used to transmit messages. Since then, electrical devices have a dramatic effect on our daily lives.

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