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Controlling swarms of robots with a finger

May 13, 2015 8:05 am | by Jason Maderer, Georgia Institute of Technology | Videos | Comments

Using a smart tablet and a red beam of light, Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have created a system that allows people to control a fleet of robots with the swipe of a finger. A person taps the tablet to control where the beam of light appears on a floor. The swarm robots then roll toward the illumination, constantly communicating with each other and deciding how to evenly cover the lit area.

Pattern recognition using magnonic holographic memory

May 12, 2015 7:55 am | by Sean Nealon, Univ. of California, Riverside | News | Comments

Researchers have successfully demonstrated pattern recognition using a magnonic holographic memory device, a development that could greatly improve speech and image recognition hardware. Pattern recognition focuses on finding patterns and regularities in data. The uniqueness of the demonstrated work is that the input patterns are encoded into the phases of the input spin waves.

An important step in artificial intelligence

May 11, 2015 4:51 pm | by Sonia Fernandez, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara | News | Comments

In what marks a significant step forward for artificial intelligence, researchers at Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, have demonstrated the functionality of a simple artificial neural circuit. For the first time, a circuit of about 100 artificial synapses was proved to perform a simple version of a typical human task: image classification.

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Unlocking the creation of wearable electronic devices

May 11, 2015 11:58 am | by Univ. of Exeter | News | Comments

An international team of scientists, including Prof. Monica Craciun from the Univ. of Exeter, have pioneered a new technique to embed transparent, flexible graphene electrodes into fibers commonly associated with the textile industry. The discovery could revolutionize the creation of wearable electronic devices, such as clothing containing computers, phones and MP3 players, which are lightweight, durable and easily transportable.

Smart cane provides facial recognition for blind

May 8, 2015 10:50 am | by Birmingham City Univ. | News | Comments

A revolutionary “smart” cane enabling the visually impaired to instantly identify friends and family could be available soon, thanks to students at Birmingham City Univ. The “XploR” mobility cane, being developed by ICT students Steve Adigbo, Waheed Rafiq and Richard Howlett, uses smartphone technology to recognize familiar faces from up to 10-m away. The cane also features GPS functionality to aid navigation.

Improving organic transistors that drive flexible, comfortable electronics

May 5, 2015 12:40 pm | by Janet Lathrop, Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst | News | Comments

A revolution is coming in flexible electronic technologies as cheaper, more flexible, organic transistors come on the scene to replace expensive, rigid, silicone-based semiconductors, but not enough is known about how bending in these new thin-film electronic devices will affect their performance, say materials scientists at the Univ. of Massachusetts Amherst.

New chip architecture may provide foundation for quantum computer

May 5, 2015 11:25 am | by American Institute of Physics | News | Comments

Quantum computers are in theory capable of simulating the interactions of molecules at a level of detail far beyond the capabilities of even the largest supercomputers today. Such simulations could revolutionize chemistry, biology and material science, but the development of quantum computers has been limited by the ability to increase the number of quantum bits, or qubits, that encode, store and access large amounts of data.

A first for field-effect transistors

May 5, 2015 11:14 am | by Bonnie Davis, Office of Communications and External Relations, Wake Forest Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers from Wake Forest Univ. and the Univ. of Utah are the first to successfully fabricate halide organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite field-effect transistors and measure their electrical characteristics at room temperature. The team designed the structure of these field-effect transistors to achieve electrostatic gating of these materials and determine directly their electrical properties.

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Channeling valleytronics in graphene

May 5, 2015 8:05 am | by Lynn Yarris, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

To the list of potential applications of graphene we can now add valleytronics, the coding of data in the wave-like motion of electrons as they speed through a conductor. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers have discovered topologically protected 1-D electron conducting channels at the domain walls of bilayer graphene. These conducting channels are “valley polarized".

Cellular sensing platform supports next-gen bioscience, biotech applications

May 1, 2015 8:25 am | by John Toon, Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a novel cellular sensing platform that promises to expand the use of semiconductor technology in the development of next-generation bioscience and biotech applications. The research proposes and demonstrates the world’s first multi-modality cellular sensor arranged in a standard low-cost CMOS process.

“Fingerprinting” chips to fight counterfeiting

May 1, 2015 7:37 am | by Rob Matheson, MIT News Office | News | Comments

It’s often said that no two human fingerprints are exactly alike. For that reason, police often use them as evidence to link suspects to crime scenes. The same goes for silicon chips: Manufacturing processes cause microscopic variations in chips that are unpredictable, permanent, and effectively impossible to clone.

Chemists cook up three-atom-thick electronic sheets

April 30, 2015 8:41 am | by Anne Ju, Cornell Univ. | News | Comments

Making thin films out of semiconducting materials is analogous to how ice grows on a windowpane: When the conditions are just right, the semiconductor grows in flat crystals that slowly fuse together, eventually forming a continuous film. This process of film deposition is common for traditional semiconductors like silicon or gallium arsenide, but Cornell Univ. scientists are pushing the limits for how thin they can go.

Power Outages Limit Tech’s Ability to Help People Connect After Quake

April 27, 2015 10:06 am | by Associated Press, Foster Klug | News | Comments

Power outages and communications problems have made life agonizing for the nearly 6 million Nepalese who live abroad— or about 22 percent of the population. They try desperately to reach loved ones through cellphones and global messaging apps, only to be met with silence or fleeting connections. The impoverished country’s communications have been shaken back to a different era.

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Researchers use novel polarization to increase data speeds

April 24, 2015 7:53 am | by Jay Mwamba, The City College of New York | News | Comments

As the world’s exponentially growing demand for digital data slows the Internet and cell phone communication, City College of New York researchers may have just figured out a new way to increase its speed.

Gamers feel the glove

April 23, 2015 7:51 am | by Mike Williams, Rice Univ. | Videos | Comments

Rice Univ. engineering students are working to make virtual reality a little more real with their invention of a glove that allows a user to feel what they’re touching while gaming. The Hands Omni glove developed at Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen will provide a way for gamers and others to feel the environments they inhabit through the likes of 3-D heads-ups displays.

Putting a new spin on computing memory

April 22, 2015 11:23 am | by Britt Faulstick, Drexel Univ. | News | Comments

Ever since computers have been small enough to be fixtures on desks and laps, their central processing has functioned something like an atomic Etch A Sketch, with electromagnetic fields pushing data bits into place to encode data. Unfortunately, the same drawbacks and perils of the mechanical sketch board have been just as pervasive in computing.

Electronic device performance enhanced with new transistor encasing method

April 21, 2015 7:50 am | by Austin Keating, News Bureau Intern, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign | News | Comments

A more effective method for closing gaps in atomically small wires has been developed by Univ. of Illinois researchers, further opening the doors to a new transistor technology. Silicon-based transistors have been the foundation of modern electronics for more than half a century. A new transistor technology, carbon nanotube wires, shows promise in replacing silicon because it can operate ten times as fast and is more flexible.

Deadline Extended for 2015 R&D 100 Award Entries

April 20, 2015 1:53 pm | by Lindsay Hock, Editor | News | Comments

The editors of R&D Magazine have announced a deadline extension for the 2015 R&D 100 Awards entry process until May 18, 2015. The R&D 100 Awards have a 50 plus year history of awarding the 100 most technologically significant products of the year.

Chinese Awards Part 2

April 20, 2015 12:34 pm | by Tim Studt | Blogs | Comments

Tim Studt here again, and mostly recovered from my day-long travel on Friday. Hot and humid here in Taipei, about 25 F warmer than in Chicago. Today's judging at the Taiwan Excellence Awards covered healthcare-based tablet computers, electronic memory modules, top-end gaming computers, electric scooters, racing bicycles and even off-road mountain racing bike tires.

Advances in molecular electronics

April 20, 2015 10:27 am | by Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf | News | Comments

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and the Univ. of Konstanz are working on storing and processing information on the level of single molecules to create the smallest possible components that will combine autonomously to form a circuit. As recently reported in Advanced Science, the researchers can switch on the current flow through a single molecule for the first time with the help of light.

Chinese Awards

April 20, 2015 9:56 am | by Tim Studt | Blogs | Comments

Tim Studt here in Taipei judging the 23rd annual Taiwan Excellence Awards with seven other judges from Germany, Japan and Taiwan academia. Sponsored by the Taiwan Ministry of Economic Affairs, these awards were developed to encourage Taiwan companies to incorporate innovation and value into their products. Selection of winners are based on R&D, design, quality and marketing/branding.

Technology can transfer human emotions to your palm through air

April 20, 2015 8:03 am | by Univ. of Sussex | Videos | Comments

Human emotion can be transferred by technology that stimulates different parts of the hand without making physical contact with your body, a Univ. of Sussex-led study has shown. Sussex scientist Dr. Marianna Obrist has pinpointed how next-generation technologies can stimulate different areas of the hand to convey feelings of, for example, happiness, sadness, excitement or fear.

Thumbnail track pad

April 17, 2015 7:36 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT News Office | Videos | Comments

Researchers are developing a new wearable device that turns the user’s thumbnail into a miniature wireless track pad. They envision that the technology could let users control wireless devices when their hands are full: answering the phone while cooking, for instance. It could also augment other interfaces, allowing someone texting on a cellphone, say, to toggle between symbol sets without interrupting his or her typing.

On the road to spin-orbitronics

April 14, 2015 7:55 am | by Lynn Yarris, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Few among us may know what magnetic domains are, but we make use of them daily when we email files, post images or download music or video to our personal devices. Now a team of researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has found a new way of manipulating the walls that define these magnetic domains and the results could one day revolutionize the electronics industry.

Graphene looks promising for future spintronic devices

April 10, 2015 7:39 am | by Chalmers Univ. of Technology | News | Comments

Researchers at Chalmers Univ. of Technology have discovered that large area graphene is able to preserve electron spin over an extended period, and communicate it over greater distances than had previously been known. This has opened the door for the development of spintronics, with an aim to manufacturing faster and more energy-efficient memory and processors in computers.

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