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The Lead

Lighting the way for future electronic devices

November 17, 2014 8:15 am | by Univ. of Southampton | News | Comments

Researchers at the Univ. of Southampton have demonstrated how glass can be manipulated to create electronic devices that will be smaller, faster and consume less power. The researchhas the potential to allow faster, more efficient electronic devices; further shrinking the size of our phones, tablets and computers and reducing their energy consumption by turning waste heat into power.

Smartphone app to cut risk of power outages

November 14, 2014 10:45 am | by Carl Blesch, Rutgers Univ. | News | Comments

An easy-to-use smartphone app developed by Rutgers Univ. engineers will help keep the lights on...

Atomic timekeeping, on the go

November 12, 2014 7:58 am | by Jennifer Chu, MIT News Office | News | Comments

What time is it? The answer, no matter what your initial reference may be, will always trace...

Microsoft unveils fitness gadget, health tracking

October 31, 2014 9:17 am | by Anick Jesdanun, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Microsoft is releasing a $199 fitness band that also checks your email and even pays for coffee...

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Study: Cinematic experience governed by contextual clues, not screen size

October 29, 2014 1:12 pm | News | Comments

If the surroundings are designed to be sufficiently stimulating, even a simple computer screen is enough to generate an intense cinematic experience. After observing some 300 study subjects, researchers in Germany have concluded that the angle of viewing does not play a vital role in the cinematic experience. Instead, the presence of so-called contextual visual cues plays a greater role in actually drawing viewers into a movie.

When emotions control objects

October 20, 2014 11:51 am | by Cécilia Carron, EPFL | Videos | Comments

Sensors developed by SmartCardia, a spin-off from EPFL in Switzerland, use various biological vital signs to transmit data to a host of everyday objects. This data, which includes heart rate, respiration activity, skin conductivity and physical exertion, can be used dim a light, control immersive playing on a computer, and track yoga exercises in real time.

Revving up fluorescence for superfast LEDs

October 14, 2014 9:17 am | News | Comments

Duke Univ. researchers have made fluorescent molecules emit photons of light 1,000 times faster than normal, setting a speed record and making an important step toward realizing superfast light emitting diodes (LEDs) and quantum cryptography. This finding could help make LED technology, which earned a Nobel Prize this year, suitable for use as a light source in light-based telecommunications.

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Google Glass gets speech-to-text update

October 6, 2014 8:20 am | by Jason Maderer, Georgia Institute of Technology | Videos | Comments

A team of Georgia Institute of Technology researchers has created speech-to-text software for Google Glass that helps hard-of-hearing users with everyday conversations. A hard-of-hearing person wears Glass while a second person speaks directly into a smartphone. The speech is converted to text, sent to Glass and displayed on its heads-up display.

Can a football stadium be as “smart”as a phone?

October 3, 2014 10:21 am | by Michael Liedtke, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

It's a tough challenge for the National Football League to entice fans off their comfy couches and into stadiums when ticket prices are almost as high as the sport's TV ratings. Equipped with lots of technology, fans at home can watch multiple games on Sunday from the couch. So when the owners of the San Francisco 49ers drew up plans for the team's new $1.3 billion stadium, they tapped the ingenuity surrounding their Silicon Valley home.

Tech-friendly cities struggle with new biz rules

September 29, 2014 9:12 am | by Philip Marcelo, Associated Press | News | Comments

A renowned technology hub that is home to some of the country's top universities, Boston is emerging as an unlikely battleground for web-based businesses like Airbnb and Uber, with some saying more regulations are needed to prevent the upstarts from disrupting more established industries. Cities like Boston have been wrestling with the same questions and developing solutions ranging from outright bans to minimum safety requirements.

Reflected smartphone transmissions enable gesture control

September 22, 2014 8:52 am | by Michelle Ma, Univ. of Washington | News | Comments

Some smartphones are starting to incorporate 3-D gesture sensing based on cameras, but cameras consume significant battery power and require a clear view of the user’s hands. Univ. of Washington engineers have developed a new form of low-power wireless sensing technology that could soon contribute to gesture control by letting users “train” their smartphones to recognize and respond to specific hand gestures near the phone.

Want to print your own cell phone microscope for pennies?

September 16, 2014 8:01 am | by Susan Bauer, PNNL | Videos | Comments

At one o'clock in the morning, layers of warm plastic are deposited on the platform of the 3-D printer that sits on scientist Rebecca Erikson's desk. A small plastic housing, designed to fit over the end of a cell phone, begins to take shape. Pulling it from the printer, Erikson quickly pops in a tiny glass bead and checks the magnification.

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Apple's smartwatch: Timely idea or clocked out?

September 12, 2014 9:24 am | by Mae Anderson, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

A habitual party crasher, Apple has a history of arriving late and making a big splash in various gadget categories. But can it continue with the Apple Watch? Smartwatches have been around for a few years, but makers such as Samsung and Sony have failed to make them a runaway hit. Apple's Watch won't go on sale until early 2015 and raises questions: Can the company work its magic as it has in the past?

Apple pushes digital wallet with Apple Pay

September 10, 2014 8:47 am | by Mae Anderson, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Apple is betting that people want to pay with a tap of the phone rather than a swipe of the card. The technology company on Tuesday introduced a new digital wallet service called Apple Pay that is integrated with its Passbook credential-storage app and its fingerprint ID security system. The announcement came as Apple introduced several new products including a new, larger iPhone 6 and a watch.

Microsoft revamps MSN to flow across devices

September 8, 2014 12:25 am | by Mae Anderson - AP Technology Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Microsoft is giving its MSN news service a crisper look, new lifestyle tools and seamless syncing across devices. The company says the revamped site fits in with Microsoft's overall strategy of making mobile phones and Internet-based services priorities as its traditional businesses—Windows and Office software installed on desktops—slow down or decline.

Smartphone app can detect newborn jaundice in minutes

August 27, 2014 11:40 am | by Michelle Ma, Univ. of Washington | News | Comments

Newborn jaundice: It’s one of the last things a parent wants to deal with, but it’s unfortunately a common condition in babies less than a week old. Skin that turns yellow can be a sure sign that a newborn is jaundiced and isn’t adequately eliminating the chemical bilirubin. But that discoloration is sometimes hard to see. Researchers have developed a smartphone application that checks for jaundice in newborns.

Smartphones set out to decipher a cryptographic system

August 26, 2014 8:29 am | by Sébastien Corthésy, EPFL | News | Comments

Researchers in Switzerland have created an Android app which lets users get together to crack a modern cryptographic code. Building on earlier work that used a network of 300 PlayStation consoles, the scientists decided to leverage the power of smartphones. By running the algorithm a very large number of times the code may be broken eventually.

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Razor-sharp TV pictures

August 25, 2014 1:24 pm | News | Comments

The future of movie, sports and concert broadcasting lies in 4K definition, which will bring cinema quality TV viewing into people’s homes. With its 3840 x 2160 resolution, 4K Ultra HD has four times as many pixels as today’s Full HD. The new HEVC video compression standard now allows broadcasters to transmit live video in the 4K digital cinema standard, and was used recently to broadcast a soccer game in Germany.

Future phones to use blood, speech to monitor HIV, stress, nutrition

August 25, 2014 9:30 am | by Cornell Univ. | News | Comments

David Erickson, a professor at Cornell Univ., will receive a $3 million National Science Foundation grant over five years to adapt smartphones for health monitoring. The program, dubbed PHeNoM for Public Health, Nanotechnology, and Mobility, aims to deploy three systems that can have an immediate impact on personal healthcare.

A smart wristband for nocturnal cyclists

July 30, 2014 12:08 pm | News | Comments

A team of engineers in Switzerland have invented a wristband that flashes when the rider reaches out to indicate a turn. Designed to add safety for cyclists in urban areas, the relatively simple device consists of an accelerometer and a magnetometer that can detect the position of the user's arm. When the rider reaches out laterally, the accelerometer and magnetometer provide data to a microcontroller, which directs the LED to engage.

Gadget Watch: PadFone novel as phone-tablet hybrid

July 28, 2014 1:26 pm | by Anick Jesdanun - AP Technology Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Companies often blend old products to give you something new. This summer, AsusTek Computer Inc. claims you don't need both a phone and a tablet—as long as you get its new PadFone X. The PadFone works like any other phone and has a screen that measures 5 in diagonally.

Microsoft makes design central to its future

July 21, 2014 3:24 pm | by Ryan Nakashima - AP Business Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Before Ralf Groene helped devise the look and feel of Microsoft's Surface tablet, he designed food — or "food concepts," he says, for people on the go. Among them: dried noodles that come wrapped around a pair of chopsticks; a tubular meal that can be pulled with two fingers from a car cup holder base; and a fork that squeezes out sauce.

Microsoft cutting 18,000 jobs, signals new path

July 17, 2014 12:23 pm | by Ryan Nakashima - AP Business Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Microsoft announced the biggest layoffs in its history Thursday, saying it will cut 18,000 jobs or 14 percent of its workforce as it streamlines its Nokia mobile device business to focus on using the Windows Phone operating system. Although the job cuts had been expected, the extent of them was a surprise.

LG Display unveils 18-inch flexible display

July 11, 2014 11:38 am | by Youkyung Lee, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

The South Korean display panel maker LG has developed an 18-inch flexible display that can be rolled into the shape of a thin cylinder, a step toward making a large display for flexible TVs. Although not as sharp as the latest ultra-high definition flat screens, the new display has a resolution of 1200 pixels by 810 pixels and maintains its function when it is rolled up.

New York police see risks with drones' popularity

July 10, 2014 9:43 am | by Tom Hays, Associated Press | News | Comments

Police in New York City are concerned that the increasing popularity of drones in such a tightly packed metropolis could carry major risks, even becoming a potential tool for terrorists to conduct surveillance or carry out attacks. Even though it's illegal to fly the devices just about anywhere in New York City without permission, recent incidents and breathtaking videos of Manhattan suggest that the restrictions are being widely flouted.

Own your own data

July 10, 2014 7:28 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Cell phone metadata has been in the news quite a bit lately, but the National Security Agency isn’t the only organization that collects information about people’s online behavior. Newly downloaded cell phone apps routinely ask to access your location information, your address book or other apps, and of course, Websites like Amazon or Netflix track your browsing history in the interest of making personalized recommendations.

TransWall: KAIST’s two-sided, transparent touchscreen

July 8, 2014 1:01 pm | Videos | Comments

Researchers in Korea have been working to perfect their two-sided, touchable, transparent display technology called TransWall. Featuring an incorporated surface transducer, TransWall provides audio and vibrotactile feedback to users, enabling people to see, hear, or even touch other people through the wall while enjoying gaming and interpersonal communication.

MIT finger device reads to the blind in real time

July 8, 2014 10:30 am | by Rodrique Ngowi, Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are developing an audio reading device to be worn on the index finger of people whose vision is impaired, giving them affordable and immediate access to printed words. The so-called FingerReader, a prototype produced by a 3-D printer, fits like a ring on the user's finger, and is equipped with a small camera that scans text.

Google to show off smart home gadgets, wearables

June 25, 2014 8:14 am | by Barbara Ortutay, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

An Android update, wearable gadgets, and so-called smart home devices are just some of the innovations Google is likely to show off at its two-day developer conference, which begins today in San Francisco. In recent years, the conference has focused on smartphones and tablets, but this year Google's Android operating system is expected to stretch into cars, homes, and smartwatches.

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