Advertisement
Communications
Subscribe to Communications
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

NASA mission will study what disrupts radio waves

April 26, 2013 8:46 am | by Karen C. Fox, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

A NASA-funded sounding rocket mission will launch from an atoll in the Pacific in the next few weeks to help scientists better understand and predict the electrical storms in Earth's upper atmosphere These storms can interfere with satellite communication and global positioning signals.

Tracking gunfire with a smartphone

April 26, 2013 8:41 am | by David Salisbury, Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

You are walking down the street with a friend. A shot is fired. The two of you duck behind the nearest cover and you pull out your smartphone. A map of the neighborhood pops up on its screen with a large red arrow pointing in the direction the shot came from. A team has made such a scenario possible by developing a system that transforms a smartphone into a shooter location system.

What did Alexander Graham Bell's voice sound like?

April 26, 2013 8:34 am | News | Comments

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s sound-restoration experts have done it again. They’ve helped to digitally recover a 128-year-old recording of Alexander Graham Bell’s voice, enabling people to hear the famed inventor speak for the first time. The recording ends with Bell saying “in witness whereof, hear my voice, Alexander Graham Bell.”

Advertisement

Engineers generate world-record millimeter-wave output power from nanoscale CMOS

April 25, 2013 7:44 am | News | Comments

A team of  electrical engineers from Columbia University has generated a record amount of power output—by a power of five—using silicon-based nanoscale CMOS technology for millimeter-wave power amplifiers. Power amplifiers are used in communications and sensor systems to boost power levels for reliable transmission of signals over long distances as required by the given application.

Computational physics software supported presidential inauguration

April 19, 2013 12:41 pm | News | Comments

The Naval Research Laboratory aided both the 2009 and 2013 Presidential Inaugurations with a technology called CT-Analyst. The software modeling tool is designed to provide first responders with a tool that can provides accurate, instantaneous, 3D predictions of chemical, biological, and radiological agent transport in urban settings.

New keyboard developed for touchscreens

April 17, 2013 4:32 pm | News | Comments

A research team in Europe has created a new keyboard called KALQ that enables faster thumb-typing on touchscreen devices. They used computational optimization techniques in conjunction with a model of thumb movement to search among millions of potential layouts to find the best one. A study confirmed that users could type 34% faster than they could with a QWERTY layout.

School’s “Drone Lab” reimagines possibilities for UAVs

April 17, 2013 9:17 am | News | Comments

Say the word “drone” and the image most often conjured is a flying object that is spying on an enemy, or delivering a weapon to a target. Students at University of California, Berkeley’s Drone Lab are developing open-source software that helps put drones to more socially beneficent use. Their efforts require little more than a consumer-grade drone, a smartphone, and a new JavaScript-based software platform.

System allows multitasking runners to read on a treadmill

April 16, 2013 10:03 am | News | Comments

Not many people can run and read at the same time, because the relative location of the eyes to the text is constantly changing. This forces the eyes to constantly adjust. At Purdue University, an industrial engineering professor has introduced a new innovation called ReadingMate, which adjusts text on a monitor to counteract the bobbing motion of a runner's head so that the text appears still.

Advertisement

Microtransistor prototypes map the mind

April 12, 2013 9:42 am | by Blaine Friedlander, Cornell University | News | Comments

To make better mind maps, a group of French scientists—building on prototypes developed at the Cornell University NanoScale Science and Technology Facility—have produced the world’s first microscopic, organic transistors that can amplify and record signals from within the brain itself.

Researchers develop tiny gradient chip

April 12, 2013 8:52 am | News | Comments

Nanotechnologists at the University of Twente have developed a tiny chip that makes it easy to create micrometer-scale gradients. Gradients are gradual transitions in specific properties, such as acidity. This newly developed system can be used to efficiently measure the reaction kinetics of various chemical or biological reactions.

New software could alleviate wireless traffic

April 12, 2013 7:53 am | News | Comments

The explosive popularity of wireless devices is increasingly clogging the airwaves, resulting in dropped calls, wasted bandwidth, and botched connections. New software, called GapSense, being developed at the University of Michigan works like a stoplight to control the traffic and dramatically reduce interference.

Bose-Einstein condensates evaluated for communicating among quantum computers

April 11, 2013 5:03 pm | News | Comments

Quantum computers promise to perform certain types of operations much more quickly than conventional digital computers. But many challenges must be addressed before they become available. Among them, the loss of order in the systems, which worsens as the number of bits in a quantum computer increases. Now, a team of physicists has examined Bose-Einstein communication might work.

Researchers call for marine observation network

April 11, 2013 3:31 am | News | Comments

A comprehensive marine biodiversity observation network could be established with modest funding within five years, according to a recently published assessment from a team led by J. Emmett Duffy of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. Such a network, they say, would fill major gaps in scientists' understanding of the global distribution of marine organisms.

Advertisement

Researchers invent better single-photon emitter for quantum cryptography

April 9, 2013 6:31 pm | News | Comments

In a development that could make the advanced form of secure communications known as quantum cryptography more practical, University of Michigan researchers have demonstrated a simpler, more efficient single-photon emitter that can be made using traditional semiconductor processing techniques.

Technique finds software bugs in surgical robots

April 9, 2013 5:08 am | News | Comments

Surgical robots could make some types of surgery safer and more effective, but proving that the software controlling these machines works as intended is problematic. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Johns Hopkins University have demonstrated that methods for reliably detecting software bugs and ultimately verifying software safety can be applied successfully to this breed of robot.

ORNL microscopy uncovers “dancing” silicon atoms in graphene

April 3, 2013 4:17 pm | News | Comments

Jumping silicon atoms are the stars of an atomic scale ballet featured in a new Nature Communications study from the U.S. Department of Energy(DOE)'s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The ORNL research team documented the atoms' unique behavior by first trapping groups of silicon atoms, known as clusters, in a single-atom-thick sheet of carbon called graphene.

Open Photonics, VTT collaborate on spectral engine technologies

April 3, 2013 3:09 pm | News | Comments

Orlando-based photonics technology acceleration company Open Photonics Inc. and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland have announced a partnership to accelerate the commercialization of VTT’s advanced Fabry-Perot visible and infrared spectroscopy and spectral imaging technologies.  

First-ever secure quantum code transmitted through air

April 3, 2013 9:56 am | News | Comments

Physicists in Germany have, for the first time, successfully transmitted secure quantum information through the atmosphere from an aircraft to a ground station. Given the accuracy of the laser- and mirror-based system, which 3 m over a distance of 20 km, the experiment represents an important step towards secure satellite-based global communication.

Another step toward quantum computers: Using photons for memory

April 1, 2013 1:57 pm | News | Comments

Scientists at Yale University have found a new way to manipulate microwave signals that could aid the long-term effort to develop a quantum computer, a powerful tool that would revolutionize information processing through unprecedented speed and power. The researchers created an artificial medium in which photons repel photons, allowing for efficient, non-destructive encoding and manipulation of quantum information.

Acoustic time delay device could reduce size, cost of phased-array systems

April 1, 2013 7:51 am | News | Comments

Radar systems today depend increasingly on phased-array antennas, an advanced design in which extensive grids of solid-state components direct signal beams electronically. Phased-array technology is replacing traditional electromechanical radar antennas because stationary solid-state electronics are faster, more precise, and more reliable than moving mechanical parts. Yet phased-array antennas, which require bulky supporting electronics, can be as large as older systems. To address this issue, a research team from the Georgia Institute of Technology has developed a novel device.

Scientists in Korea develop low-power 60 GHz RF chip for mobile devices

March 31, 2013 6:44 pm | News | Comments

As a possible method for accelerating transmission of large data, researchers are studying the adoption of gigabits per second (Gbps) wireless communications operating over the 60 GHz radio frequency (RF) band. But mobile applications have not been developed yet because the 60 GHz RF circuit consumes hundreds of milliwatts of DC power. A new chip developed at KAIST in Korea, however, consumes as little 67 mW of power thanks to newly developed components.

Apple patents iPhone with wraparound display

March 29, 2013 4:47 pm | by PETER SVENSSON - AP Technology Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Apple is seeking a patent for an iPhone that has a display that wraps around the edges of the device, expanding the viewable area and eliminating all physical buttons. The patent application reveals that Apple has put some thought into a device that takes advantage of a new generation of displays, which don't have to be flat and rigid like today's liquid-crystal displays, or LCDs.

Better than X-rays: A more powerful terahertz imaging system

March 28, 2013 8:47 am | News | Comments

Low-energy terahertz radiation could potentially enable doctors to see deep into tissues without the damaging effects of X-rays, or allow security guards to identify chemicals in a package without opening it. But it's been difficult for engineers to make powerful enough systems to accomplish these promising applications. Now an electrical engineering research team at the University of Michigan has developed a laser-powered terahertz source and detector system that transmits with 50 times more power and receives with 30 times more sensitivity than existing technologies.

Scientists propose laser system to produce the next LHC

March 28, 2013 8:09 am | News | Comments

An international team of physicists has proposed a revolutionary laser system, inspired by the telecommunications technology, to produce the next generation of particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The International Coherent Amplification Network sets out a new laser system composed of massive arrays of thousands of fiber lasers, for both fundamental research at laboratories, such as CERN, and more applied tasks such as proton therapy and nuclear transmutation.

Backpack-sized mini-mapper captures intel in tight spots

March 27, 2013 7:44 am | News | Comments

Engineers have recently developed a portable mapping system—carried in a backpack—that can be used to automatically create annotated physical maps of locations where GPS is not available, such as in underground areas and on ships. The system improves upon algorithms once developed for robots—which are not practical for all environments—and has a built-in allowance for normal human movement, like walking.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading