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Cost-effective oxygen sensors

August 31, 2005 8:00 pm | Award Winners

The High-Temperature Potentiometric Oxygen Sensor with Internal Reference, developed by teams at Ohio State Univ., Columbus and Argonne National Laboratory, Ill., can withstand temperature up to 1600° C and eliminates the need for costly and bulky high temperature resistant external plumbing for a reference air system.

Battle-worthy membrane

August 31, 2004 8:00 pm | Award Winners

In a joint effort, researchers from Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, and Battelle, Columbus, Ohio, have developed a low-cost, high-temperature polymer membrane dubbed Battellion for use in Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells.

The oil hunt

August 31, 2004 8:00 pm | Award Winners

Research conducted by the Dept. of Energy states that nearly two-thirds of the oil discovered in the U.S. remains unharvested even after numerous recovery operations. This scenario is exacerbated by the lack of detailed information regarding oil reservoir conditions and well integrity. As a response to this need, Anbo Wang and his colleagues at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, devised the Miniature Laser-Bonded Self-Calibrating Interferometric Fiber Optic Sensor Technology for Oil Down-Hole Applications.

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Take this tiny motor for a spin

August 31, 2004 8:00 pm | Award Winners

Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is the current buzzword when it comes to small machines. But while MEMS motors can fit on the head of a pin, NEMS (nanoelectromechanical systems) motors can fit on a virus. The overall size of this nanomotor is ~300 nm, three orders of magnitude smaller than existing MEMS motors, making Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Synthetic Rotational Nanomotor the smallest synthetic motor ever made.

Line up for this ruler

August 31, 2004 8:00 pm | Award Winners

While it may sound like a measuring device for Lilliputians, the Nanoruler is actually a tool used for patterning large gratings with very high accuracy. Created by a team led by Mark Schattenburg at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, the device uses scanning-beam interference lithography (SBIL) to pattern gratings with distortions that are 10 to 100 times smaller than previously available.

Revolutionary engine components

August 31, 2003 8:00 pm | Award Winners

Created by NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, Univ. of Toledo, Ohio, and Texas A&M Univ., College Station, Texas, the High Temperature, High Load Radial Magnetic Bearing system enables high speed as well as high temperature operation of large diameter shaft systems.

Advancing Raman-based measurement

August 31, 2003 8:00 pm | Award Winners

Created by Iowa State Univ., Ames, researchers, Marc Porter, and Bob Liepert, with Christian Schoen, President, Concurrent Analytical Inc., Kailua, Hawaii, the Ramanprobe System is a low cost, high throughput, fiber-optic Raman microscopy system accompanied by a new line of extrinsic Raman label (ERL) reagents.

Internal breaches reach a block

August 31, 2003 8:00 pm | Award Winners

A break in internal security can have dire consequences on an organization, especially when speaking of financial service institutions and hospitals. To prevent such breaches and close the security holes present, Palisade Systems Inc., and Iowa State Univ., both from Ames, Iowa, created the FireBlock Security Appliance. Designed to protect crucial assets from internal attacks at the network level, this novel device proactively blocks and records unauthorized access, without limiting network performance.

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Cost-effective micro-nano actuator

August 31, 2003 8:00 pm | Award Winners

Actuators have expanded from humble single-axis linear systems into extravagant configurations with the rise of increasingly intricate applications. As these applications demand more sensitivity and multi-directional movement, the cost of the product accrues. The HexFlex Nano-manipulator, developed by MIT researchers, provides a low-cost alternative.

Coating extends seals’ durability

August 31, 2003 8:00 pm | Award Winners

A group of scientists at Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, Pa., Argonne National Laboratory, Ill., and the Univ. of Illinois at Chicago, has produced a novel coating for seals called the Nanostructured Carbide Derived Carbon (CDC). This film can be used in an array of rotating or sliding machines, promising to minimize energy consumption and improve a pump’s reliability.

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