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Scientific & Medical Instrumentation
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The Lead

MiXcroscopy correlative imaging solution introduced by JEOL, Nikon

March 28, 2014 12:49 pm | News | Comments

JEOL and Nikon have integrated optical microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy in a way that enables seamless observation of the same region of interest on a sample with fast, accurate navigation. The technique, MiXcroscopy, employs the same specimen holder for both the optical microscope and the scanning electron microscope.

Micro systems with big commercial potential featured in SPIE journal

March 26, 2014 9:28 am | News | Comments

Commercial demand is driving high-tech research...

Giant macrophages discovered in blood of cancer patients

March 20, 2014 11:44 am | News | Comments

When cancers become advanced, tumor cells from the...

New technique allows frequent water quality monitoring for pollutants

March 5, 2014 10:19 am | News | Comments

Incomplete or infrequent water quality data can...

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Beckman Coulter partners with Wyatt on particle characterization

March 4, 2014 3:02 pm | News | Comments

Beckman Coulter Life Sciences has announced an agreement with Wyatt Technology Corp. to enable collaboration on products, applications and technical development. The partnership brings together Wyatt’s expertise in protein characterization, light scattering and biophysics with Beckman Coulter’s expertise in particle counting, particle characterization and cell viability measurement.

Nanoscale freezing leads to better imaging

February 26, 2014 4:40 pm | by Justin H.S. Breaux | News | Comments

For scientists to determine if a cell is functioning properly, they often must destroy it with ionizing radiation, which is used in x-ray fluorescence microscopy to provide detail that conventional microscopes can’t match. To address this, Argonne National Laboratory researchers created the R&D 100 Award-winning Bionanoprobe, which freezes cells to “see” at greater detail without damaging the sample.

The end of full-body scanners?

February 26, 2014 11:04 am | News | Comments

Standing in a full-body scanner at an airport isn’t fun, and the process adds time and stress to a journey. It also raises privacy concerns. But researchers now report making several key advances in terahertz wave sensor technology to create a more precise and direct method for using these waves to detect explosives from greater distances.

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Andor Technology joins Oxford Instruments to drive growth

February 12, 2014 8:57 am | News | Comments

Oxford Instruments, a leading provider of high-technology tools for industry and research has recently acquired Andor. A supplier of high-performance cameras, microscope systems and software for the physical science and life science industries, Andor will continue to focus on growing its existing core markets and will spearhead Oxford Instruments strategic expansion into the nanobiotechnology arena.

FEI acquires oil and gas imaging specialist Lithicon

February 7, 2014 8:34 am | News | Comments

Instrumentation company FEI has acquired Lithicon AS of Trondheim, Norway, and Canberra, Australia. Lithicon provides digital rock technology services and pore-scale micro computed tomography (µCT, or microCT) equipment to oil and gas companies worldwide. In conjunction with the acquisition, FEI has obtained the helical scan microCT product and associated software from the Australia National Univ.

Team develops rapid smartphone-based mercury testing and mapping

February 5, 2014 8:59 am | by Matthew Chin, UCLA | News | Comments

A team of engineers from the Univ. of California, Los Angeles has developed a smartphone attachment and application to test water for the presence of mercury, a toxic heavy metal. The new platform could significantly reduce the time and cost of the testing, and it could be particularly useful in regions with limited technological resources.

Weight loss program for infrared cameras

February 3, 2014 8:56 am | News | Comments

Infrared sensors can be employed in a wide range of applications, such as driver assistance systems for vehicles or thermography for buildings. However, IR detectors need to be permanently cooled, resulting in cameras that are large, heavy and energy-intensive. Researchers are now developing IR sensors for the far-infrared region that can operate at room temperature and a new prototype camera is providing a test bed for development.

Raman Microscope

January 28, 2014 12:04 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Designed to quickly reveal molecular structure, chemical composition and sample morphology, the new Thermo Scientific DXRxi Raman imaging microscope can provide insights, identify defects and confirm product quality with a high degree of confidence. By employing the image-centric software interface, users can quickly profile materials through information-rich chemical images.

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Deep-diving sub Alvin cleared to return to service

January 28, 2014 11:44 am | News | Comments

After a three-year overhaul and major upgrade, the United States' deepest-diving research submersible, Alvin, has been cleared to return to work exploring the ocean's depths. The sub has been out of service since December 2010, undergoing a major upgrade, including the replacement of its personnel sphere with a newly fabricated, larger, more capable hull.

New device prevents falls in the elderly

January 17, 2014 12:26 pm | News | Comments

Falls are a major problem for the elderly. Each year, one-third of adults over age 65 experience a fall, and one-third of those falls impact health and autonomy. The Swiss spin-off Gait Up just put an extremely thin motion sensor on the market which can detect the risk of a fall in an older person and is equally useful for sports and physical therapy.

Microscopic fountain pen to be used as a chemical sensor

January 15, 2014 12:39 pm | News | Comments

The atomic force microscope (AFM) uses a fine-tipped probe to scan surfaces at the atomic scale. But soon, thanks to efforts by scientists in The Netherlands, the AFM will soon be augmented with a new type chemical sensor, one that resembles a microscopic fountain pen. A hollow AFM cantilever acts as the pen, delivering droplets of mercury at the tip, which acts as a chemical sensor.

Thin Layer Chromatograph

December 26, 2013 11:06 am | Product Releases | Comments

Field Forensics has announced the availability of microTLC, a portable, fast, and easy-to-use solution for rapid pre-screening and presumptive identification of drugs and explosive mixtures. microTLC achieves package miniaturization by using only one thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate.

Integrated Drive for OEM Pumps

December 23, 2013 10:42 am | Product Releases | Comments

Watson-Marlow Pumps Group will introduce the DriveSure, a new panel-mount OEM brushless DC gear motor with fully integrated speed controller at MD&M West 2014 at Anaheim Convention Center, Calif., in February. The highly adaptable drive is designed for biopharmaceutical, medical device, and process analysis equipment.

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ScreenTape Assay for Next-Gen Sequencing

December 19, 2013 11:30 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Agilent Technologies Inc. has introduced two new assays for the 2200 TapeStation system: the RNA ScreenTape and the D1000 ScreenTape assays. Both assays are essential for the quality control of samples in next-generation sequencing (NGS) workflow. They replace Agilent’s R6K and D1K ScreenTape assays.

Europe launches satellite to map 1 billion stars

December 19, 2013 7:16 pm | by Danica Coto and Frank Jordans, Associated Press | News | Comments

Astronomers are still largely working with a “flat” map of the galaxy, and the European Space Agency hopes to change that with Gaia, its star-surveying satellite which launched into space Thursday. The spacecraft will produce the most accurate 3-D map of the Milky Way yet. Gaia is now heading for a stable orbit on the opposite side of the Earth from the sun, and will always keep its back to the sun.

Researchers develop advanced 3-D “force microscope”

December 17, 2013 3:19 pm | News | Comments

Until recently, the microscopic study of complex membrane proteins has been restricted due to limitations of “force microscopes” that are available to researchers and the one-dimensional results these microscopes reveal. Now, researchers at the Univ. of Missouri have built a 3-D microscope that will yield unparalleled information on membrane proteins and how they interact in cells. The innovation could speed up drug development.

Scanning Electron Microscope

December 17, 2013 2:59 pm | Product Releases | Comments

At M&M 2013, Indianapolis, ZEISS launched the next generation EVO scanning electron microscope (SEM) series for material and life science applications. Improvements in the SEM’s workflow automation, beam deceleration technology, and HD BSE detector can reduce a workflow from more than 400 steps to just 15.

Multicapacity Microreactor

December 16, 2013 3:12 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The Hiden Catlab integrated micro-reactor/mass spectrometer system now addresses an extended applications range with the introduction of enlarged sample capacity options to accommodate sample volumes up to 2mL. The system monitors gas and vapor reaction products directly from the sample position via the primary sampling interface.

Multipoint Scanning Confocal Microscope

December 16, 2013 3:07 pm | Product Releases | Comments

At the 2013 American Society for Cell Biology Annual Meeting, Bruker introduced the Opterra Multipoint Scanning Confocal Microscope, which integrates confocal microscopy with photoactivation capabilities for applications in biology.

Scientists publish first radiation measurements from the surface of Mars

December 10, 2013 1:55 pm | News | Comments

In the first 300 days of the Mars Science Laboratory surface mission, the Curiosity rover collected soil samples in Gale Crater while the onboard Radiation Assessment Detector made detailed measurements of the radiation environment on the surface of Mars. Southwest Research Institute scientists have published the results of these studies, comparing them to typically doses received on Earth.

Smithsonian, Olympus team up on new science education effort

December 10, 2013 10:47 am | News | Comments

Q?rius (pronounced “Curious”) is a new hub of scientific activity and education based at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington D.C. The product of a partnership between Olympus and the Smithsonian, the 10,000-square-foot experiential learning center will be equipped with dozens of microscopes and imaging systems that will enable museum visitors more than 6,000 bones, minerals, and fossils.

Gene sequencing that everyone can afford

December 6, 2013 8:15 am | News | Comments

Researchers in China, working on the optimization of a third-generation sequencing technique based on nanopores, have found that long-chain DNA with low salt concentration is more conducive to the nanopore sequencing process. This finding may improve the efficiency of sequencing, and further low the cost of gene sequencing.

Bruker receives FDA clearance to market MALDI Biotyper CA System

November 27, 2013 11:52 am | News | Comments

Bruker Corp. has announced that it has been granted U.S. FDA clearance under Section 510(k) to market its MALDI Biotyper CA System in the United States for the identification of Gram negative bacterial colonies cultured from human specimens. The clearance marks progress in Bruker’s efforts to develop MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry into the most advanced platform for clinical microbiology identification.

Thermo Fisher Scientific receives clearance for Life Technologies acquisition

November 27, 2013 11:44 am | News | Comments

The European Commission has approved the pending acquisition of Life Technologies Corp. by Thermo Fisher Scientific, which has committed to divest its cell culture (sera and media), gene modulation and magnetic beads businesses to expedite the approval. Combined, these businesses had 2012 revenue of approximately $225 million.

Motion control technology from PI powers Mars science

November 26, 2013 4:40 pm | by Paul Livingstone, Senior Editor | Articles | Comments

Two of the key instruments aboard NASA’s Curiosity rover on Mars are the CheMin, a mineral sample analyzer, and the ChemCam, a spectroscopic imaging system. Both systems require precise, fast motion control, capable of surviving a harsh environment. Jet Propulsion Laboratory engineers found a solution with piezo-based technology from Physik Instrumente and miCos. But first it would need to pass rigorous testing.

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