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Pharmaceuticals & Biopharmaceuticals
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Scientists to use tiny particles to fight big diseases

October 23, 2014 12:49 pm | Videos | Comments

A group of scientists in Florida have combined medicine and advanced nanotechnological engineering to create a smarter, more targeted therapy that could overcome the most lethal gynecologic cancer. The technology involves combining Taxol, a chemotherapy drug, with magneto-electric nanoparticles that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier.

2nd Annual Pharma Data Analytics Conference

September 29, 2014 3:10 pm | Events

The 2nd Annual Pharma Data Analytics Conference will enable senior-level analytics professionals...

German Merck to buy Sigma-Aldrich for $17 billion

September 22, 2014 12:35 pm | by David McHugh, AP Business Writer | News | Comments

German...

Better use of electronic health records makes clinical trials less expensive

July 11, 2014 12:40 pm | News | Comments

According to recent research in the U.K. , use of...

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Agilent collaborates with Seoul National Univ. on new research center

May 13, 2014 7:39 am | News | Comments

Agilent Technologies Inc. has announced the signing of a memorandum of understanding with Seoul National Univ., Korea's top research university, on a new research center that will support the College of Pharmacy's New Drug Development Center. The collaboration will conduct drug metabolism studies, develop new compounds, study remedial effects and toxicity, assess pharmacokinetics, and conduct clinical tests for drugs.

Dead Cell Removal Device

March 24, 2014 2:46 pm | Product Releases | Comments

AMSBIO has announced the launch of ClioCell, an ex vivo device for removal of dying and dead cells, improving viability and quality of cell populations and their subsequent productivity. The system comprises super-paramagnetic nanoparticles which have been coupled with proprietary elements that bind to dead and dying cells and cell debris. 

New high-throughput method proposed for screening, ranking anti-aging drugs

March 14, 2014 7:27 am | News | Comments

Scientists in the U.K. have proposed a new computer-based method of screening drugs that could be used to slow the aging process in humans. The proposed method uses gene expression data from “young” and “old” tissues to construct the cloud of molecular signalling pathways involved in ageing and longevity. It then evaluates the effects of a large number of drugs and drug combinations to emulate a youthful state for cells and tissues.

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Doctors often uncertain in ordering, interpreting lab tests

March 10, 2014 12:43 pm | by Sharon Parmet, Univ. of Illinois Chicago | News | Comments

Over the past 20 years, the number of laboratory tests available to primary care physicians has doubled, to more than 3,500 tests, and physicians are challenged by the quantity of tests available. A recent survey conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests they often face uncertainty in ordering and interpreting clinical laboratory tests, and would welcome better electronic clinical decision support tools.

Pharma data play larger role in Olympic drug tests

February 10, 2014 7:48 am | by Matthew Perrone, AP Health Writer | News | Comments

Some of the world's biggest drugmakers are playing a larger role in anti-doping efforts at this year's Winter Olympics: They're providing information on drugs that once would have been considered proprietary trade secrets. GlaxoSmithKline, Amgen and Roche are among the drugmakers that have begun sharing data about experimental drugs as part of an effort to stay one step ahead of drug cheats.

Advanced approach identifies new drug candidates from genome sequence

February 10, 2014 7:41 am | News | Comments

In research that could ultimately lead to many new medicines, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have developed a potentially general approach to design drugs from genome sequence. As a proof of principle, they identified a highly potent compound that causes cancer cells to attack themselves and die.

Merck joins companies ending chimpanzee research

January 31, 2014 8:38 am | News | Comments

Drugmaker Merck & Co. is joining two dozen other pharmaceutical companies and contract laboratories in committing to not use chimpanzees for research. The growing trend could mean roughly 1,000 chimps in the U.S. used for research or warehoused for many years in laboratory cages could be "retired" to sanctuaries by around 2020.

Study: Hybrid nanomaterials could replace human tissue, today’s pills

November 22, 2013 8:12 am | News | Comments

A team of researchers has uncovered critical information that could help scientists understand how protein polymers interact with other self-assembling biopolymers. The research helps explain naturally occurring nanomaterial within cells and could one day lead to engineered bio-composites for drug delivery, artificial tissue, bio-sensing, or cancer diagnosis.

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Brain imaging reveals dynamic changes caused by pain medicines

November 20, 2013 8:39 pm | News | Comments

Univ. of Michigan researchers are the first to use brain imaging procedures to track the clinical action of pregabalin, a drug known by the brand name Lyrica that is prescribed to patients suffering from fibromyalgia and neuropathic pain. The study suggests role of brain imaging in creating personalized treatment of chronic pain.

Cheminformatics Software

September 24, 2013 12:31 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Accelrys Inc. has announced the release of Accelrys Insight and Accelrys Insight for Excel, completing the roll-out of Accelrys’ next-generation cheminformatics suite and providing an interactive, collaborative environment for rapid and effective decision-making in drug discovery.

NSF report details increase in business research and development

September 20, 2013 12:25 pm | News | Comments

According to a recent study published by the National Science Foundation (NSF), businesses spent more on research and development (R&D) in 2011 than they did in 2010. The figures revealed that during 2011, companies in manufacturing industries performed $201 billion, or 68%, of domestic R&D.

When writing antibiotic prescriptions, doctors favor strongest drugs

August 1, 2013 1:55 pm | News | Comments

A study at the Univ. of Utah finds that more than 60% of antibiotic prescriptions are for types that kill multiple kinds of bacteria. Unfortunately, in more than 25% of cases such prescriptions are useless because the infection stems from a virus, which cannot be treated with antibiotics. This overuse of antibiotics has a number of downsides.

Chemical reaction could streamline manufacture of pharmaceuticals

July 23, 2013 8:50 am | News | Comments

Researchers in Texas have discovered a new chemical reaction that has the potential to lower the cost and streamline the manufacture of compounds ranging from agricultural chemicals to pharmaceutical drugs. The reaction resolves a long-standing challenge in organic chemistry in creating phenolic compounds from aromatic hydrocarbons quickly and cheaply.

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Sigma-Aldrich, Scripps partner to accelerate reagent commercialization

July 18, 2013 9:33 am | News | Comments

On Thursday, Sigma-Aldrich Corp.announced a partnership with The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) to fund research and provide immediate, day-of-publication access to TSRI researchers’ discoveries for the synthesis and analysis of potential drugs. The partnership promises to eliminate months from the translation of cutting-edge chemistry into widespread applications for drug discovery.

Avastin fails studies in new brain tumor patients

June 2, 2013 9:39 am | by MARILYNN MARCHIONE - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

New research raises fresh questions about which cancer patients benefit from Avastin, a drug that lost its approval for treating breast cancer nearly two years ago. Two studies found that Avastin did not prolong life when used as a first treatment for people with brain tumors like the one U.S. Sen. Edward Kennedy died of several years ago. Side effects also were more common with Avastin.

GlaxoSmithKline buys vaccine developer Okairos

May 29, 2013 4:10 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

British drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline PLC said Wednesday that it will buy Okairos AG for about $323 million, gaining the Swiss vaccine developer's products. GlaxoSmithKline said Okairos is studying vaccine technology that could be used in shots that can both prevent and cure infections or diseases.

Biogen submits new MS drug for FDA approval

May 21, 2013 3:13 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Specialty drugmaker Biogen Idec said Tuesday it submitted a new injectable multiple sclerosis drug to the Food and Drug Administration for U.S. market approval. The drug, called Plegridy, is intended to treat patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis.

XenoPort MS treatment fails in late-stage testing

May 20, 2013 12:01 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Shares of XenoPort Inc. sank Monday after the drug developer said a potential treatment for multiple sclerosis patients failed in late-stage clinical testing, and it will stop developing the drug. The Santa Clara, Calif., company said the treatment, labeled arbaclofen placarbil, failed to show a statistically significant improvement for patients taking it compared to a fake drug.

State pharmacy boards back more FDA oversight

May 9, 2013 2:47 pm | by MATTHEW PERRONE - AP Health Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

State pharmacy officials on Thursday threw their support behind a proposal giving the Food and Drug Administration authority over large compounding pharmacies, in an effort to head off more outbreaks tied to contaminated medications. The head of the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy told Senate lawmakers that his group welcomes FDA action against pharmacies.

FDA OKs Bristol's HIV drug for younger patients

May 3, 2013 5:51 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. said Friday that U.S. regulators expanded approval of its HIV drug Sustiva to children as young as three months old. The capsule-based drug was first approved in 1998 to treat HIV-infected children who are age three and older and weigh at least 22 pounds. The new approval expands the drug's use to children age three months to three years who weigh at least 7.7 pounds.

FDA device will screen for fake medicines overseas

April 24, 2013 1:19 pm | by MATTHEW PERRONE - AP Health Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

U.S. health officials are making a high-tech screening device available to African authorities to help spot counterfeit malaria pills in hopes that the technology may eventually be used to combat the fake drug trade worldwide. The FDA announced Wednesday that regulators in Ghana will begin using a federally developed handheld device to screen for fake or diluted versions of two common malaria pills.

FDA finds safety issues at specialty pharmacies

April 12, 2013 11:29 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration says it has uncovered potential safety problems at 30 specialty pharmacies that were inspected in the wake of a recent outbreak of meningitis caused by contaminated drugs. The agency said its inspectors targeted 31 compounding pharmacies that produce sterile drugs, which must be prepared under highly sanitary conditions.

Pfizer inks deal with nanotechnology drugmaker

April 3, 2013 1:36 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

BIND Therapeutics said Wednesday that Pfizer Inc. has agreed to pay it $160 million per drug as part of a collaboration to develop targeted medicines using nanotechnology which use particles measured in billionths of a meter. BIND is developing an experimental group of targeted, programmable...

FDA approves first-of-its-kind diabetes drug from J&J

March 29, 2013 3:38 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved a first-of-its-kind diabetes drug from Johnson & Johnson that uses a new method to lower blood sugar—flushing it out in patients' urine. The agency cleared J&J's Invokana tablets for adults with Type 2 diabetes, which affects an estimated 26 million Americans. The once-a-day medication works by blocking the kidneys from reabsorbing sugar, which occurs at higher levels in patients with diabetes than in healthy patients.

FDA approves imaging drug for cancer lymph nodes

March 13, 2013 1:45 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new imaging drug to help doctors locate lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer and skin cancer. The drug Lymphoseek from Navidea Biopharmaceuticals Inc. is a radioactive imaging agent that is intended to help determine if breast cancer or melanoma has spread to a patient's lymph nodes.

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