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Researchers make clothes from sugar

April 3, 2014 1:25 pm | News | Comments

In the future, the clothes you wear could be made from sugar. Researchers have discovered a new chemical process that can convert adipic acid directly from sugar.                         

Researchers open path to finding rare, polarized metals

April 2, 2014 12:31 pm | Videos | Comments

Researchers are turning some of the basic tenets of chemistry and physics upside down to cut a...

Rapid materials testing in 3-D

March 20, 2014 12:31 pm | News | Comments

Ultrasound is a proven technology in components...

Matheson acquires Continental Carbonic Products

February 13, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

Global gas manufacturer and supplier Matheson Tri-...

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Study suggests ways to improve common furniture fire test

February 11, 2014 8:19 am | News | Comments

NIST and American Univ. researchers report in a new study that the bench-scale test widely used to evaluate whether a burning cigarette will ignite upholstered furniture may underestimate the tendency of component materials to smolder when these materials are used in sofas and chairs supported by springs or cloth. The study comes as regulations and methods for evaluating ignition in furniture are undergoing scrutiny.

FEI acquires oil and gas imaging specialist Lithicon

February 7, 2014 8:34 am | News | Comments

Instrumentation company FEI has acquired Lithicon AS of Trondheim, Norway, and Canberra, Australia. Lithicon provides digital rock technology services and pore-scale micro computed tomography (µCT, or microCT) equipment to oil and gas companies worldwide. In conjunction with the acquisition, FEI has obtained the helical scan microCT product and associated software from the Australia National Univ.

NASA boards the 3-D manufacturing train

February 6, 2014 1:01 pm | by Lori Keesey, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

Additive manufacturing, or 3-D printing, offers a compelling alternative to more traditional manufacturing approaches at NASA, where the need for highly custom­ized spacecraft and instrument components is quite high. The agency has recently launched a number of formal programs to prototype new 3-D printed components, including rocket engine injectors, and 3-D printers for use in space.

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Study identifies quake-prone concrete buildings in Los Angeles area

February 4, 2014 9:00 am | News | Comments

Researchers in the George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation have studied concrete buildings constructed before roughly 1980 in the Los Angeles area. Their work has identified examples of this category of buildings, sometimes referred to as nonductile concrete buildings, which are known from experience in previous earthquakes to have the potential for catastrophic collapse during strong earthquakes.

World’s first continuous-wave, tunable diamond Raman lasers

January 31, 2014 12:13 pm | News | Comments

Scientists at the Univ. of Strathclyde, U.K., have successfully demonstrated two notable high-power laser research developments: the first ever tunable diamond Raman laser and the first continuous-wave (CW) laser. Both lasers use synthetic diamond material made by California’s Element Six. The breakthrough is a significant achievement in solid-state laser engineering.

Stratasys introduces world’s first color multi-material 3-D printer

January 28, 2014 1:39 pm | News | Comments

Stratasys, a manufacturer of 3-D printers and materials for personal use, prototyping and production, has announced the launch of the ground-breaking Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3-D Printer, the first and only 3-D printer to combine colors with a variety of photopolymer 3-D printed materials.

Manufacturing Data Measurement Software

December 19, 2013 11:46 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Hexagon Metrology has announced the availability of PC-DMIS 2013 MR1, a mid-term release of its measurement software used to collect, evaluate, manage and present manufacturing data. Software highlights include new user interface elements for a cleaner, simpler look and feel, more than 100 customer-driven enhancements, and new software tools.

ORNL devises recipe to fine-tune diameter of silica rods

December 16, 2013 3:22 pm | News | Comments

The goal of fabricating fixed-size one-dimensional silica structures and being able to precisely control the diameter during growth has long eluded scientists. Now, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers Panos Datskos and Jaswinder Sharma have demonstrated what they describe as the addressable local control of diameter of each segment of the silica rod.

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SunPartner Technologies, 3M to deliver wireless transparent solar charging system

November 22, 2013 3:56 pm | News | Comments

SunPartner Technologies and 3M Company have announced an agreement to collaborate in product development and technical solutions based on engineered electronics materials from 3M and transparent solar cell technologies from Sunpartner Technologies. The two companies are developing a sustainable wireless transparent micro component that will charge devices while they are being used and exposed to light.

Bulletproof suit uses military-grade carbon nanotube technology

November 5, 2013 4:20 pm | News | Comments

The Toronto-based luxury bespoke tailoring house Garrison Bespoke launched the first fashion-forward bulletproof suit with a live ammo field-testing event at the Ajax Rod and Gun Club at in Ontario. The Garrison Bespoke bulletproof suit is made with carbon nanotubes created using nanotechnology and originally developed to protect U.S. forces in Iraq. The patented material is thinner, more flexible and 50% lighter than Kevlar.

Microfluidic material breakthrough allows wafer-scale mass production of lab-on-chip

November 1, 2013 12:04 pm | News | Comments

Belgian nanoelectronics research center Imec and JSR, a materials company based in Tokyo, Japan, announce that they have successfully used JSR’s innovative PA (Photo-patternable Adhesive) material for wafer-scale processing of lab-on-chip devices. Using this material, imec has processed microfluidic cell-sorter devices, merging microheaters and sensors with wafer-scale polymer microfluidics.

Futuristic copper foam batteries get more bang for the buck

October 24, 2013 8:39 am | News | Comments

Amy Prieto, a chemist at Colorado State Univ. leads a start-up company with the goal of developing a lithium-ion battery that should be safer, cheaper, faster-charging, and more environmentally friendly than conventional batteries now on the market. The key to the technology is copper foam which is easy to manufacture and has high power density.

Cheap metals can be used to make products from petroleum

October 21, 2013 2:30 pm | News | Comments

A new process developed at the Univ. of Illinois at Chicago suggests that base metals may be used as catalysts in the manufacture of countless products made from petroleum-based raw materials. The metals, copper and iron, could potentially replace a rare and expensive metal catalyst currently required for the chemical process called borylation.

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Giga-year storage medium could outlive human race

October 17, 2013 2:14 pm | News | Comments

Although the amount of data that can be stored has increased immensely during the past few decades, it is still difficult to actually store data for a long period of time. A researcher has recently demonstrated a way to store data for extremely long periods, even millions of years, using an etched wafer made of tungsten encapsulated by silicon nitride. The material is resistant to both time and elevated temperatures.

First pilot system to extract dandelion rubber for making tires

October 14, 2013 12:24 pm | News | Comments

Rubber can be extracted from the juice of the dandelion, but transitioning this technology to the industrial setting has been a challenge. The Fraunhofer Institute in Germany has joined with Continental tire company to build the first-ever pilot system to extract vast quantities of dandelion rubber for making tires

Thermally Conductive Potting Compound

October 2, 2013 11:07 am | Product Releases | Comments

The 50-3152FR thermally conductive potting compound from Epoxies Etc. offers fast heat dissipation and stability during thermal cycling. And unlike many similar compounds that mix in slightly uneven ratios, 50-3152FR mixes in equal parts.

Densest array of carbon nanotubes grown to date

September 20, 2013 1:10 pm | News | Comments

A team from Cambridge Univ. in England has devised a simple technique to increase the density of nanotube forests grown on conductive supports about five times over previous methods. The new technique could one day help improve the performance of microelectronics in devices ranging from batteries to spacecraft.

Fuel-efficient cars, planes could be cheaper with magnesium drawn from ocean

September 20, 2013 1:03 pm | News | Comments

Magnesium is a lightweight metal used in cars and planes to improve their fuel efficiency. But it currently requires a lot of energy and money to produce the metal. Engineers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a new production method that would be 50% more energy efficient than the United States' current production process.

NSF report details increase in business research and development

September 20, 2013 12:25 pm | News | Comments

According to a recent study published by the National Science Foundation (NSF), businesses spent more on research and development (R&D) in 2011 than they did in 2010. The figures revealed that during 2011, companies in manufacturing industries performed $201 billion, or 68%, of domestic R&D.

Breakthrough technique could make electronics smaller, better

September 4, 2013 7:15 am | News | Comments

An international group of researchers from the U.S. and South Korea have discovered a groundbreaking technique in manufacturing nanostructures that has the potential to make electrical and optical devices smaller. The new patterning technology, called atomic layer lithography, based on a layering technique at the atomic level and relies on a surprising low-tech tool: Scotch Magic tape.

Study reveals true raw material footprint of nations

September 3, 2013 10:37 am | News | Comments

The amount of raw materials needed to sustain the economies of developed countries is significantly greater than present indicators suggest, a new Australian study has revealed. Using a new modeling tool and more comprehensive indicators, researchers Australia were able to map the flow of raw materials across the world economy with unprecedented accuracy to determine the true “material footprint” of 186 countries over a two-decade period.

New nanoparticles to make solar cells cheaper to manufacture

August 29, 2013 4:43 pm | News | Comments

Researchers in Canada have found that abundant materials in the Earth's crust can be used to make inexpensive and easily manufactured nanoparticle-based solar cells. The team has designed nanoparticles that absorb light and conduct electricity from two very common elements: phosphorus and zinc. These are much more plentiful than scarce cadmium, and safer than lead.

A new atomic crystal dynamic for titanium dioxide found

August 29, 2013 4:20 pm | News | Comments

Titanium dioxide is an inexpensive, yet versatile material. The use of titanium oxide in the electronics industry is currently being investigated. An international team of researchers has confirmed theoretically-predicted interactions between single oxygen molecules and crystalline titanium dioxide and the implications of these findings could be important for a variety of applications.

Old concrete can protect aquatic ecosystems

August 22, 2013 10:27 am | News | Comments

Lakes and streams are often receiving so much phosphorous that it can pose a threat to the local aquatic environment. Now, research in Denmark shows that an easy and inexpensive solution is available to prevent phosphorus from being discharged to aquatic environments: crushed concrete from demolition sites.

Terahertz technology fights fashion fraud

August 8, 2013 11:43 am | News | Comments

The fashion industry in many countries amounts to tens of billions of dollars in value, and has historically been vulnerable to counterfeiters. Scientists from the U.K.’s National Physical Laboratory have published recent research that demonstrates how a technique called terahertz time-domain spectroscopy could be used to help spot fakes and combat textile counterfeiting.

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