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Leading scientists call for a stop to non-essential use of fluorochemicals

August 28, 2014 8:27 am | News | Comments

A number of leading international researchers, among others from the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, have recommended that fluorochemicals should only be used where absolutely essential, until better methods exist to measure the chemicals and more is known about their potentially harmful effects.

Food allergies: A new, simple method to track down allergens

July 8, 2014 1:20 pm | News | Comments

Scientists in Switzerland have developed a fast...

Cosmic caffeine: Astronauts getting espresso maker

June 27, 2014 2:37 pm | by Marcia Dunn, AP Aerospace Writer | News | Comments

Talk about a cosmic caffeine jolt. The...

Preserving bread longer: A new edible film made with essential oils

June 4, 2014 9:59 am | News | Comments

Essential oils have boomed in popularity as more...

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Protecting olive oil from counterfeiters

April 24, 2014 1:50 pm | by Barbara Vonarburg, ETH Zurich | News | Comments

Counterfeit or adulterated olive oil has been a persistent presence on the market, in part because the oil is difficult to track. An invisible label, developed by researchers in Switzerland, could perform this task. The tag consists of tiny magnetic DNA particles encapsulated in a silica casing and mixed with the oil. Just a few grams of the new substance are enough to tag the entire olive oil production of Italy.

Beckman Coulter partners with Wyatt on particle characterization

March 4, 2014 3:02 pm | News | Comments

Beckman Coulter Life Sciences has announced an agreement with Wyatt Technology Corp. to enable collaboration on products, applications and technical development. The partnership brings together Wyatt’s expertise in protein characterization, light scattering and biophysics with Beckman Coulter’s expertise in particle counting, particle characterization and cell viability measurement.

Chemists use sugar-based gelator to solidify vegetable oils

December 20, 2013 12:34 am | News | Comments

Researchers at The City College of New York have reported the successful transformation of vegetable oils to a semisolid form using low-calorie sugars as a structuring agent. The findings portend the development of alternatives to structured oil products produced using saturated/trans fatty acids, which have been linked to coronary artery disease, obesity, and diabetes.

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Food-tech startups aim to replace eggs and chicken

December 9, 2013 1:35 pm | by Terence Chea, Associated Press | News | Comments

Funded by prominent Silicon Valley investors and Microsoft founder Bill Gates, Hampton Creek Foods seeks to disrupt a global egg industry that backers say wastes energy, pollutes the environment, causes disease outbreaks and confines chickens to tiny spaces. The company, which just started selling a mayonnaise made without eggs, is part of a new generation of so-called food-tech ventures that aim to change the way we eat.

Additive may make wine fine for a longer time

November 21, 2013 12:52 pm | by Matthew Swayne, Penn State Univ. | News | Comments

Oxygen usually enters wine through the cork and interacts with metals, particularly iron, setting off a chain reaction that changes compounds that add often disagreeable tastes and smells to the drink. Penn State Univ. researchers have added chelation compounds that bind with metals to inhibit oxidation, or oxygen's ability to react with trace metals. These compounds, they found, were effective.

Device speeds concentration step in food-pathogen detection

October 14, 2013 1:39 pm | by Emil Venere, Purdue Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a system that concentrates foodborne salmonella and other pathogens faster than conventional methods by using hollow thread-like fibers that filter out the cells. The machine, called a continuous cell concentration device, could make it possible to routinely analyze food or water samples to screen for pathogens within a single work shift at food processing plants.

Mars food study researchers emerge from dome

August 14, 2013 9:14 am | by Jennifer Sinco Kelleher, Associated Press | News | Comments

Six researchers have spent the past four months living in a small dome on a barren Hawaii lava field at 8,000 feet, trying to figure out what foods astronauts might eat on Mars and during deep-space missions. They emerged on Tuesday with their recipes and without the space suits they were required to wear each time they ventured onto the northern slope of Mauna Loa—an active volcano that last erupted in 1984.

Scientists serve lab-made burger from cow cells

August 5, 2013 10:56 am | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Two volunteer taste-testers in London got the unusual opportunity of sampling a stem-cell burger. Though it was reportedly short on taste, the burger represents five years of research. Made from meat grown in a laboratory from the stem cells of cattle, the the burger is part of an effort to help solve both the food crisis and climate change.

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EU, U.S. to extend cooperation on measurements, standards

July 25, 2013 8:08 am | News | Comments

The European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the U.S. Dept. of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) this week agreed to expand their current scientific cooperation to include new areas of research, such as energy, health care and clinical measurements, and food safety and nutrition.

New technologies, ingredients offer better options for gluten-free eating

July 18, 2013 9:54 am | News | Comments

According to a presentation this week at the 2013 Institute of Food Technologists exposition in Chicago, new technologies and ingredients are improving the taste, appearance and nutritional content of gluten-free food products, a market that is expected to grow to $6 billion by 2017. An estimated one in 133 Americans has celiac disease, an immune disorder triggered by the ingestion of gluten peptides found in wheat, barley and rye.

Platinum nanoparticles may keep fruit fresh longer

May 13, 2013 8:16 am | News | Comments

Ripening fruit, vegetables, and flowers release ethylene, which works as a plant hormone. Ethylene accelerates ripening, so other unripened fruit also begins to ripen—fruit and vegetables quickly spoil and flowers wilt. researchers in Japan have now introduced a new catalytic system for the fast and complete degradation of ethylene. This could keep the air in warehouses ethylene-free, keeping perishable products fresh longer.

An electronic nose can tell pears and apples apart

May 8, 2013 12:13 pm | News | Comments

Swedish and Spanish engineers have created a system of sensors that detects fruit odors more effectively than the human sense of smell. For now, the device, which has 32 sensors and can process scent data in real time, can distinguish between the odorous compounds emitted by pears and apples, but the system can be tailored to other applications.

In-package plasma process quickly, effectively kills bacteria

April 17, 2013 8:49 am | by Brian Wallheimer, Purdue University | News | Comments

Kevin Keener, a professor of food science at Purdue University, looks for new ways to kill harmful bacteria, and has determined that exposing packaged liquids, fruits, and vegetables to an electrical field for just minutes could remove all traces of foodborne pathogens. His method uses electricity to generate a plasma, or ionized gas, from atmospheric gases inside the food package.

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Carbon-graphite Material for Food Applications

March 6, 2013 2:38 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Metallized Carbon Corporation, a manufacturer of oil-free, self-lubricating, carbon-graphite materials for severe service lubrication applications, announces that its Metcar Grade M-58 has received approval from the FDA so that it can be used in food contact applications.  This will permit the use of Metcar Grade M-58 in dry running, food mixer seals to provide lower seal friction and longer seal wear life.    

Beer will help power Alaska brewery

February 4, 2013 9:12 am | by Joshua Berlinger, Associated Press | News | Comments

The Alaskan Brewing Co. is going green, but instead of looking to solar and wind energy, it has turned to a very familiar source: beer. The Juneau-based beer maker has installed a unique boiler system in order to cut its fuel costs. It purchased a $1.8 million furnace that burns the company's spent grain—the waste accumulated from the brewing process—into steam which powers the majority of the brewery's operations.

For bagged or boxed wine, cool is best

December 18, 2012 1:28 pm | News | Comments

In the most comprehensive study to date on how storage temperature affects wines with different packaging systems, University of California, Davis researchers found that bag-in-box wine is more vulnerable to warmer storage temperatures than bottled wine.

Fast-growing fish may never wind up on your plate

December 5, 2012 10:45 am | by Matthew Perrone, AP Health Writer | News | Comments

After weathering concerns about everything from the safety of humans eating the salmon to their impact on the environment, Aquabounty was in a position to become the world's first company to sell fish whose DNA has been altered to speed up growth. But after positive feedback from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2010, the agency still has not approved the fish and the company could soon run out of money.

Fluorescent pH-sensitive nanoparticles indicate bacterial growth

October 30, 2012 1:26 pm | News | Comments

The food industry is strict in its vigilance toward bacteria in products. Now their efforts may be eased by a new bacteria monitoring method developed by researchers in Germany. The fluorescence of nanoparticles embedded in an agarose growth medium, they report, changes significantly when the pH value changes because of bacterial metabolism. This can be monitored in real time with a simple digital camera.

New simulation method produces realistic fluid movements

September 26, 2012 5:58 pm | News | Comments

What does a yogurt look like over time? The food industry will soon be able to answer this question using a new fluid simulation tool developed by scientists at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, as part of a broad partnership with other research institutions. The method distinguishes itself significantly from known simulation methods which use mesh structures where the vertices are locked in a fixed position. In the new method, the mesh structure is replaced by a dynamic structure where the vertices move one at a time.

Scientists developing new material to increase shelf life of beer

September 18, 2012 6:06 am | News | Comments

Scientists at CRANN, a nanoscience institute based at Trinity College Dublin, have partnered with brewing company SABMiller on a project to increase the shelf life of bottled beer in plastic bottles. Their research centered on a nanostructured boron nitride additive that, when added to plastic bottles, will make them impervious to carbon dioxide and oxygen.

U.S. research and development most prevalent in small number of regions

September 13, 2012 4:29 am | News | Comments

According to data from a 2008 Business R&D and Innovation Survey by the National Science Foundation, businesses perform the lion's share of their R&D activity in just a small number of geographic areas, particularly the San Jose-San Francisco-Oakland area and the New York-Newark-Bridgeport area.

Biorefinery finds treasure in spent coffee grounds and stale bakery goods

August 20, 2012 10:18 am | News | Comments

In a report presented this week at the American Chemical Society meeting in Philadelphia, researchers based in Hong Kong, in cooperation with Starbucks restaurant chain, described their work on development and successful laboratory testing of a new biorefinery designed to change food waste into a key ingredient for making plastics, laundry detergents and scores of other everyday products.

Discovery may lead to tomatoes with vintage flavor and quality

June 29, 2012 12:38 pm | News | Comments

A University of California Davis research team began studying the genes influencing tomato fruit development and ripening after spending two summers screening tomato plants for transcription factors that might play a role in both fruit color and quality. What they’ve found is that selection for tomatoes with optimal ripening qualities compromises the sugars that contribute to the fruit’s flavor.

Government to speed tracking of E. coli in meat

May 3, 2012 9:02 am | by Sam Hananel, Associated Press | News | Comments

A new Agriculture Department program will begin tracing the source of potentially contaminated ground beef as soon as there is an initial positive test. Current procedures require USDA officials to wait until additional testing confirms E. coli before starting their investigation. Under the new process, the source could be traced 24 to 48 hours sooner.

Sensor tests fruits' ripeness

May 1, 2012 10:27 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Every year, U.S. supermarkets lose roughly 10% of their fruits and vegetables to spoilage, according to the Department of Agriculture. To help combat those losses, Massachusetts Institute of Technology chemistry professor Timothy Swager and his students have built a new sensor that could help grocers and food distributors better monitor their produce.

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