Advertisement
Electronic Equipment
Subscribe to Electronic Equipment
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

New device prevents falls in the elderly

January 17, 2014 12:26 pm | News | Comments

Falls are a major problem for the elderly. Each year, one-third of adults over age 65 experience a fall, and one-third of those falls impact health and autonomy. The Swiss spin-off Gait Up just put an extremely thin motion sensor on the market which can detect the risk of a fall in an older person and is equally useful for sports and physical therapy.

Research: “Sourcing hub” could help create more efficient supply chain

January 15, 2014 3:55 pm | by Phil Ciciora, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign | News | Comments

According to Anupam Agrawal, a professor of business administration at the Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, firms can manage their sourcing better by developing relationships not only with their suppliers but also with their suppliers’ suppliers. The lack of communication or collaboration between the big players at either end of the supply chain spectrum can prevent gains in efficiencies.

Self-driving vehicles offer potential benefits, challenges for lawmakers

January 6, 2014 8:38 am | News | Comments

New research finds that the social benefits of autonomous vehicles will outweigh the likely disadvantages. Decreased crashes, increased mobility, and increases in fuel economy will drive the technology forward, says RAND Corp. researchers, despite privacy concerns and need for updates in insurance regulations.

Advertisement

Samsung sells 110-inch ultra-HD TV for $150,000

December 30, 2013 9:46 am | by Youkyung Lee, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Last year, Samsung and rival LG Electronics, the world's top two TV makers, touted organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) as the future of TV. OLED screens are ultrathin and can display images with enhanced clarity and deeper color saturation. Now, Samsung has launched a giant 110-in television that reflects global TV makers' move toward ultra HD TVs, as manufacturing bigger TVs using OLED proves too costly.

Ultra-short pulse laser delivers controlled ablation to industrial settings

December 19, 2013 7:36 pm | News | Comments

Ultra-short laser pulses provide a fast and precise way of processing a wide range of materials without excessive heat input. Scientists from Bosch, TRUMPF, Jena Univ. and Fraunhofer Institute in Germany have turned the ultra-short pulse laser into an effective series-production tool. This type of laser can remove, or ablate, tiny areas measuring just a few nanometers.

Mass. high-tech startup hopes to change biking

December 18, 2013 8:46 am | by Rodrique Ngowi, Associated Press | News | Comments

A new device transforms almost any bicycle into an electric-hybrid vehicle using an app on a smartphone. The device, called the Copenhagen Wheel, is is equipped with wireless connectivity to track travel and installed as part of a rear hub of a bike wheel. Packed with a proprietary computer, batteries, and sensors that monitor how hard a rider is pedaling, it activates an onboard motor whenever support is needed.

Can smartphones snap out of technological stupor?

December 13, 2013 3:05 pm | by Michael Liedtke and Youkyung Lee, AP Technology Writers | News | Comments

Although high-definition displays on smartphones have gotten bigger and their cameras have gotten better, the pace of gee-whiz innovation has dawdled. Smartphone and software makers are working on ways to snap out of this technological lull, although it probably will be at least another year or two before breakthroughs revolutionize the design and function of mobile computing devices.

S. Korea court: Apple didn't violate Samsung patents

December 12, 2013 5:03 pm | by Youkyung Lee, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

A Seoul court rejected Samsung's claim that iPhone and iPad models violated three of its patents, another setback for the South Korean electronics giant in a global battle with Apple over rights to technologies that power smartphones and tablets.

Advertisement

Students' robotic arm can make you stronger

December 10, 2013 8:43 am | by Kathy Matheson, Associated Press | News | Comments

The Titan Arm, a robotic device invented by Univ. of Pennsylvania engineering students, looks and sounds like part of a superhero's costume. But its creators say it's designed for ordinary people—those who need either physical rehabilitation or a little extra muscle for their job. The arm can help its wearer carry an additional 40 pounds.

Motion control technology from PI powers Mars science

November 26, 2013 4:40 pm | by Paul Livingstone, Senior Editor | Articles | Comments

Two of the key instruments aboard NASA’s Curiosity rover on Mars are the CheMin, a mineral sample analyzer, and the ChemCam, a spectroscopic imaging system. Both systems require precise, fast motion control, capable of surviving a harsh environment. Jet Propulsion Laboratory engineers found a solution with piezo-based technology from Physik Instrumente and miCos. But first it would need to pass rigorous testing.

Dim traffic sensors dull how “smart” freeways are

November 25, 2013 8:46 am | by Justin Pritchard, Associated Press | News | Comments

Buried under thousands of miles of pavement in California are 27,000 traffic sensors that are supposed to help troubleshoot both daily commutes and long-term maintenance needs on some of the nation's most heavily used and congested roadways. About 9,000 of them do not work, despite their critical role in an "intelligent transportation" system designed to do things like detect the congestion that quickly builds after an accident.

SunPartner Technologies, 3M to deliver wireless transparent solar charging system

November 22, 2013 3:56 pm | News | Comments

SunPartner Technologies and 3M Company have announced an agreement to collaborate in product development and technical solutions based on engineered electronics materials from 3M and transparent solar cell technologies from Sunpartner Technologies. The two companies are developing a sustainable wireless transparent micro component that will charge devices while they are being used and exposed to light.

An unconventional car

November 19, 2013 9:06 am | by Marlene Cimons, National Science Foundation | News | Comments

A city car under development at Ohio State Univ. has no engine, no transmission and no differential. It weighs half as much as a conventional car and is powered by battery-power motors in each of its four wheels. But it needs help from a computer to stay stable and operating smoothly, which is why the research team is designing sophisticated algorithms for the vehicle's onboard computer.

Advertisement

South Africa cemeteries to microchip tombstones

November 15, 2013 11:13 am | by Carley Petesch, Associated Press | News | Comments

Amid a rash of tombstone thefts from cemeteries in Johannesburg, a company will be offering relatives of the deceased a high-tech solution: microchips that can be inserted into the memorial that will sound an alarm and send a text message to their cell phones if it is disturbed.

Second Apple-Samsung trial in U.S. gets underway

November 12, 2013 6:36 pm | by Paul Elias, Associated Press | News | Comments

A federal judge and lawyers for the world's two biggest smartphone makers began picking a jury Tuesday to determine how much Samsung Electronics owes Apple for copying vital iPhone and iPad features. A previous jury had awarded Apple $1.05 billion, but a judge found the jury miscalculated the amount and ordered a new trial to determine how much Samsung should pay.

Driver monitoring systems extend beyond luxury nameplates

November 5, 2013 4:01 pm | News | Comments

A new market study forecasts that the global market for driver monitoring systems will reach 64.8 million units by the end of 2020 with the majority of shipments being accounted for in vehicles sold in the Asia-Pacific region. A major 2013 is that these systems are migrating from the luxury brands like Volvo and Mercedes-Benz to more mass market models.

Patent shows Samsung's rival to Google Glass

October 25, 2013 11:24 am | by Youkyung Lee, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

A patent filing shows Samsung Electronics Co. is working on a device it calls sports glasses in a possible response to Google's Internet-connected eyewear. A design patent filing at the Korean Intellectual Property Office shows a Samsung design for smartphone-connected glasses that can display information from the handset.

National Robotics Initiative invests $38 million in next-generation robotics

October 25, 2013 8:53 am | News | Comments

The National Science Foundation, in partnership with the National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Agriculture and NASA, has announced new investments totaling approximately $38 million for the development and use of robots that cooperatively work with people to enhance individual human capabilities, performance and safety.

Remote Access Software

October 14, 2013 1:58 pm | Product Releases | Comments

GrayWolf Sensing has introduced remote, cloud-based access and control of any of its WiFi enabled AdvancedSense, WolfPack or DirectSense meters. The GrayWolfLive software permits measurement data viewing on smartphones, tablets, PCs or any Web-enabled device.

World record: Wireless data transmission at 100 gigabits per second

October 14, 2013 12:50 pm | News | Comments

In a record-setting experiment, researchers with the Millilink project in Germany transmitted 100 Gbits/sec of data at a frequency of 237.5 GHz over a distance of 20 m in the laboratory. The scientists applied a photonic method to generate the radio signals at the transmitter. After radio transmission, fully integrated electronic circuits were used in the receiver.

Tesla says car fire began in battery after crash

October 3, 2013 12:04 pm | by Mike Baker and Tom Krisher, Associated Press | News | Comments

A fire that destroyed a Tesla electric car near Seattle began in the vehicle's battery pack, officials said Wednesday, creating challenges for firefighters who tried to put out the flames. The driver says he struck debris, smelled burning and the vehicle was disabled.  The liquid-cooled 85 kW-hr battery in the Tesla Model S is mounted below the passenger compartment floor and uses lithium-ion chemistry.

Tiny camera records details of scene without losing sight of big picture

September 26, 2013 9:01 am | News | Comments

Cell phone cameras improve with every new model, but are still lacking in the fine resolution department. A team of researchers have created a miniature system that has the same quality as a full-size, wide-angle lens but is about the size of a walnut. The new system could be used to build a camera that pans and zooms with no moving parts.

Satellite cameras saving endangered species

September 6, 2013 3:47 pm | Videos | Comments

Product development firm Cambridge Consultants is helping conservationists protect some of the world’s most rare and endangered species. As part of the Instant Wild project, new satellite-connected and motion-triggered cameras are beaming near-real-time images of animals from the remotest areas of Africa. A mobile app allows users anywhere in the world to view the photos, providing early warning of illegal poaching activity.

Hackers find weaknesses in car computer systems

September 3, 2013 9:40 am | by TOM KRISHER - AP Auto Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

As cars become more like PCs on wheels, what's to stop a hacker from taking over yours? In recent demonstrations, hackers have shown they can slam a car's brakes at freeway speeds, jerk the steering wheel and even shut down the engine — all from their laptop computers. The hackers are...

Space laser to prove increased broadband possible

August 29, 2013 12:07 pm | by Dewayne Washington, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

When NASA’s Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) begins operation aboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), it will attempt to show two-way laser communication beyond Earth is possible, expanding the possibility of transmitting huge amounts of data. This new ability could one day allow for 3-D high-definition video transmissions in deep space to become routine.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading