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Motion control technology from PI powers Mars science

November 26, 2013 4:40 pm | by Paul Livingstone, Senior Editor | Articles | Comments

Two of the key instruments aboard NASA’s Curiosity rover on Mars are the CheMin, a mineral sample analyzer, and the ChemCam, a spectroscopic imaging system. Both systems require precise, fast motion control, capable of surviving a harsh environment. Jet Propulsion Laboratory engineers found a solution with piezo-based technology from Physik Instrumente and miCos. But first it would need to pass rigorous testing.

Riding an electron wave into the future of microchip fabrication

November 12, 2013 7:11 pm | News | Comments

A recently developed plasma-based chip fabrication technique affords chip makers unprecedented control of plasma thanks to a population of suprathermal electrons. This is critical to modern microchip fabrication, but how the beam electrons transform themselves into this suprathermal population has been a puzzle. New computer simulations reveal how intense plasma waves generate suprathermal electrons.

Microfluidic material breakthrough allows wafer-scale mass production of lab-on-chip

November 1, 2013 12:04 pm | News | Comments

Belgian nanoelectronics research center Imec and JSR, a materials company based in Tokyo, Japan, announce that they have successfully used JSR’s innovative PA (Photo-patternable Adhesive) material for wafer-scale processing of lab-on-chip devices. Using this material, imec has processed microfluidic cell-sorter devices, merging microheaters and sensors with wafer-scale polymer microfluidics.

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SRC launches synthetic biology research effort at six universities

October 24, 2013 9:04 am | News | Comments

Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) has launched a new research program on hybrid bio-semiconductor systems that they hope will provide insights and opportunities for future information and communication technologies. The Semiconductor Synthetic Biology (SSB) program will initially fund research at six universities.

World record: Wireless data transmission at 100 gigabits per second

October 14, 2013 12:50 pm | News | Comments

In a record-setting experiment, researchers with the Millilink project in Germany transmitted 100 Gbits/sec of data at a frequency of 237.5 GHz over a distance of 20 m in the laboratory. The scientists applied a photonic method to generate the radio signals at the transmitter. After radio transmission, fully integrated electronic circuits were used in the receiver.

Applied Materials in takeover of Tokyo Electron

September 24, 2013 8:29 am | News | Comments

Chip-making equipment manufacturer Applied Materials is acquiring Tokyo Electron Ltd., a rival maker of equipment for production of semiconductors, flat panel displays and solar panels. The two companies said Tuesday their $9.39 billion all-stock transaction will result in the creation of a new company with a market capitalization of about $29 billion.

NSF report details increase in business research and development

September 20, 2013 12:25 pm | News | Comments

According to a recent study published by the National Science Foundation (NSF), businesses spent more on research and development (R&D) in 2011 than they did in 2010. The figures revealed that during 2011, companies in manufacturing industries performed $201 billion, or 68%, of domestic R&D.

Graphene photodetector integrated into computer chip

September 16, 2013 12:34 pm | News | Comments

A recent study from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology describing how graphene can be used to convert signals from optical to electrical has also been explored by engineers in Austria, who have also constructed a graphene light detector on a semiconductor chip. According to the researchers, graphene can convert all light wavelengths which are used in telecommunications.

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New Intel CEO shares vision of computing future, quark chip

September 12, 2013 7:45 am | News | Comments

During this week’s Intel Developer Forum, new Intel CEO Brian Krzanich announced a number of near-term changes for the company’s product line, including new LTE and 14-nm products, and a lower-power product family called Quark directed at future wearable electronics devices.

Hackers find weaknesses in car computer systems

September 3, 2013 9:40 am | by TOM KRISHER - AP Auto Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

As cars become more like PCs on wheels, what's to stop a hacker from taking over yours? In recent demonstrations, hackers have shown they can slam a car's brakes at freeway speeds, jerk the steering wheel and even shut down the engine — all from their laptop computers. The hackers are...

A new atomic crystal dynamic for titanium dioxide found

August 29, 2013 4:20 pm | News | Comments

Titanium dioxide is an inexpensive, yet versatile material. The use of titanium oxide in the electronics industry is currently being investigated. An international team of researchers has confirmed theoretically-predicted interactions between single oxygen molecules and crystalline titanium dioxide and the implications of these findings could be important for a variety of applications.

Linear Position Sensors

August 29, 2013 4:11 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Alliance Sensors Group has released its LV-48 linear position sensors designed and sealed to IP-68 for outdoor use in the harshest conditions. The LV-48 uses a proprietary inductive technology that allows it to replace traditional DC-LVDTs, linear potentiometers, and magnetostrictive sensors in most applications.

Using RFID for fiber composites

July 18, 2013 1:48 pm | News | Comments

Antennas that are capable of transmitting radio waves turn components into intelligent objects. Researchers in Germany have now found a way to embed these antennas in fiber composites. As a result, the technology also works with carbon and glass fibers.

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Who are you? NIST biometric publication provides two new ways to tell quickly

July 16, 2013 1:55 pm | News | Comments

A Personal Identity Verification (PIV) card is a government-issued smart card used by federal employees and contractors to access government facilities and computer networks. To assist agencies seeking stronger security and greater operational flexibility, NIST has made several modifications to the previous version of Biometric Data Specification for PIV cards.

Wireless RF Transceiver Module

July 15, 2013 1:40 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The 250 Series RF transceiver module is designed for reliable bi-directional transfer of digital data over distances of up to 4 miles (6.4 km), line of sight. High output power gives the module exceptional range and helps overcome noisy environments at shorter ranges.

Subminiature Pressure Transducers

July 11, 2013 11:05 am | Product Releases | Comments

Featuring 1% accuracy, Honeywell Sensing and Control’s Model S Series of subminiature pressure transducers fit into tight spaces with little clearance, and accurately measure pressure ranges from 100 psi to 15,000 psi.

Developers achieve world record in optical coupling efficiency

July 3, 2013 3:27 pm | News | Comments

Researchers of the Univ. of Stuttgart have achieved a new world record in coupling efficiency between optical fibers and integrated silicon waveguides. The breakthrough, which resulted in a coupling efficiency of 87%, was based on newly developed aperiodic grating coupler structures optimized at the nanoscale.

Team builds ultrasensitive molybdenum-based image sensor

July 2, 2013 12:08 pm | News | Comments

Researchers in Switzerland have designed prototype for an image sensor based on the semiconducting properties of molybdenite. Their sensor only has a single pixel, but it needs five times less light to trigger a charge transfer than the silicon-based sensors that are currently available.

Hospitals seek high-tech help for hand hygiene

June 28, 2013 12:19 pm | by Jim Salter, Associated Press | News | Comments

Hospitals have fretted for years over how to make sure doctors, nurses and staff keep their hands clean, but with only limited success. Now, some are turning to technology—beepers, buzzers, lights and tracking systems that remind workers to sanitize, and chart those who don't.

Rapid prototyping conference breaks past attendance records

June 19, 2013 12:11 am | News | Comments

More than 2,500 attendees turned out for the 2013 RAPID Conference and Exposition, almost doubling last year’s attendance and reflecting widespread excitement about 3D printing and additive manufacturing, according to event organizer SME. It included attendees from nearly 30 countries and the U.S.

NSF and SRC to fund research to create failure-resistant circuits

May 24, 2013 5:00 am | News | Comments

Leaders of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC), the world's leading university-research consortium for semiconductors and related technologies, this week announced 18 new projects funded through a joint initiative to address research challenges in the design of failure-resistant circuits and systems.

First precise MEMS output measurement technique unveiled

May 14, 2013 1:06 pm | News | Comments

Researchers in Europe have developed a new experimental system to gain accurate information on mechanical values and properties of any microelectromechanical (MEMS) device through electrical measurement. The technique works by applying a current across the device with a varying frequency and analyzes the harmonic content of the output voltage of the component parts.

Study unlocks secrets of device that is both battery and memory

April 24, 2013 10:18 am | News | Comments

Unlike the building blocks of conventional hard disk drives and memories, resistive memory cells (ReRAM) are active electrochemical components. In these cells, ions generate voltage on electrodes in a similar manner to a battery. Researchers in Europe have conducted an extensive study of ReRAMs, also described as memristors, and have found previously undiscovered sources of voltage in these devices.

High temperature alloy may be perfect solder for well electronics

April 17, 2013 9:01 am | by Meg Marquardt, Materials 360 Online | News | Comments

Technology used in downhole applications—such as geothermal or oil-well monitoring—must endure punishing conditions, from very high temperatures to tremendous pressures. Finding a solder material that can perform in these harsh environments is a constant challenge. Researchers have recently repurposed a solder alloy once intended defense applications that has all the right properties for well tasks.

China's struggle to measure economy clouds outlook

April 16, 2013 9:32 pm | by Joe McDonald, AP Business Writer | News | Comments

After China reported quarterly economic growth of 7.7% this week, global markets reacted by falling, wiping out billions of dollars in stock. The reason? Growth came in under the 8% expected by forecasters. The plunge highlighted complaints about the possible inaccuracy of Beijing's official data and the intense, possibly excessive importance traders attach to a handful of Chinese economic indicators.

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