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The Lead

A homemade solar lamp for developing countries

April 17, 2014 3:11 pm | News | Comments

The solar lamp developed by a start-up in Switzerland is a more effective, safer, and less expensive form of illumination than the traditional oil lamp currently used by more than one billion people in the world. Designed to be made by anyone, these solar-powered light-emitting diode lamps require nothing more than locally-found equipment. Only the solar panels are ordered from abroad.

Panasonic, Tesla eye joint plant in U.S. to make EV batteries

February 26, 2014 10:55 am | News | Comments

Panasonic Corp. is considering setting up a new...

Silicon Valley sees shortage of EV charge stations

January 20, 2014 6:59 pm | News | Comments

Installation of electric vehicle charging ports at...

3-D Optical Microscope for PCB Industry

December 30, 2013 1:11 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Bruker’s ContourSP large panel metrology system...

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Integrated Drive for OEM Pumps

December 23, 2013 10:42 am | Product Releases | Comments

Watson-Marlow Pumps Group will introduce the DriveSure, a new panel-mount OEM brushless DC gear motor with fully integrated speed controller at MD&M West 2014 at Anaheim Convention Center, Calif., in February. The highly adaptable drive is designed for biopharmaceutical, medical device, and process analysis equipment.

Mass. high-tech startup hopes to change biking

December 18, 2013 8:46 am | by Rodrique Ngowi, Associated Press | News | Comments

A new device transforms almost any bicycle into an electric-hybrid vehicle using an app on a smartphone. The device, called the Copenhagen Wheel, is is equipped with wireless connectivity to track travel and installed as part of a rear hub of a bike wheel. Packed with a proprietary computer, batteries, and sensors that monitor how hard a rider is pedaling, it activates an onboard motor whenever support is needed.

SMD Power Inductors

December 17, 2013 3:13 pm | Product Releases | Comments

API Delevan now offers three SMD power inductors with the highest reliability rating currently available. The MILP1812, MIL4922 and MIL8532 meet all military QPL requirements, and the ruggedized molded and leaded construction is proven against MIL-STD-202 mechanical vibration, moisture resistance, and DWV testing.

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Combination of three propulsion technologies brings maritime fuel savings

November 11, 2013 10:04 am | News | Comments

A new maritime propulsion technology called the RudderPod, which steers independently of the main propulsion unit, could save up to half a million euros in fuel costs, according to the TRIPOD research project collaborators in Europe who plan to retrofit the new system to a ship for testing. The project aims to improve propeller efficiency as well by integrating RudderPod with new types of propellers.

SRC launches synthetic biology research effort at six universities

October 24, 2013 9:04 am | News | Comments

Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) has launched a new research program on hybrid bio-semiconductor systems that they hope will provide insights and opportunities for future information and communication technologies. The Semiconductor Synthetic Biology (SSB) program will initially fund research at six universities.

Futuristic copper foam batteries get more bang for the buck

October 24, 2013 8:39 am | News | Comments

Amy Prieto, a chemist at Colorado State Univ. leads a start-up company with the goal of developing a lithium-ion battery that should be safer, cheaper, faster-charging, and more environmentally friendly than conventional batteries now on the market. The key to the technology is copper foam which is easy to manufacture and has high power density.

Why lithium-ion-batteries fail

October 18, 2013 9:48 am | by Peter Rüegg, ETH Zurich | News | Comments

Materials in lithium ion battery electrodes expand and contract during charge and discharge. These volume changes drive particle fracture, which shortens battery lifetime. A group of scientists has quantified this effect for the first time using high-resolution 3D movies recorded using x-ray tomography at the Swiss Light Source.

Color Assessment Lightbooth

September 25, 2013 12:24 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The SpectraLight QC is a visual color assessment lightbooth that can meet practically any specification. This holistic solution starts with state of the art light sources, and includes a data-driven back-end that carefully monitors the performance and condition of lamps, as well as a system to educate and certify operators.

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DC Power Supplies

September 17, 2013 9:32 am | Product Releases | Comments

B&K Precision has introduced three new base models to its XLN Series of programmable DC power supplies. Expanding on the success of the XLN Series, the new models, XLN15010, XLN30052 and XLN60026 offer an even greater range in output voltage, up to 150V, 300 V and 600 V, respectively.

The new allure of electric cars: Blazing-fast speeds

September 10, 2013 11:52 am | News | Comments

Speaking at the American Chemical Society’s meeting in Indianapolis this week, electric vehicle pioneer John E. Waters said that relatively recent advances in engineering and use of lithium-ion batteries are producing electric vehicles (EVs) capable of leaving traditional internal combustion engine race cars in the dust. Part of the shift is the elevated storage-to-torque efficiency of electric motor.

Multi-Ranging Power Supplies

August 29, 2013 4:06 pm | Product Releases | Comments

B&K Precision has expanded its DC system power supply offerings with the introduction of  the model 9115 multi-range programmable DC power source. The 9115 can deliver up to 1200 W in multiple combinations of voltage up to 80 V and current up to 60 A in a 1U form factor.

Tesla promises to add charging stations

May 31, 2013 10:26 am | News | Comments

On Thursday, electric car maker Tesla Motors Inc. said that by the end of next month it will triple the number of charging stations it runs from the current eight. The number will go to around 100 in the coming year, putting stations within reach of almost the entire populations of both U.S. and Canada. The expanded "supercharger" network will allow owners of Tesla's $70,000 Model S sedans to travel from Los Angeles to New York.

China's struggle to measure economy clouds outlook

April 16, 2013 9:32 pm | by Joe McDonald, AP Business Writer | News | Comments

After China reported quarterly economic growth of 7.7% this week, global markets reacted by falling, wiping out billions of dollars in stock. The reason? Growth came in under the 8% expected by forecasters. The plunge highlighted complaints about the possible inaccuracy of Beijing's official data and the intense, possibly excessive importance traders attach to a handful of Chinese economic indicators.

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New material class could help create better solar cells

February 12, 2013 9:54 am | News | Comments

Recent research shows that a newly discovered class of materials, called layered oxide heterostructures, could have optimal electrical characteristics. A research team at the Vienna University of Technology, together with colleagues from the United States and Germany, has now shown that these heterostructures can be used to create a new kind of extremely efficient ultra-thin solar cells.

Nanoantenna array could be vast improvement over silicon

February 5, 2013 12:01 pm | by Colin Poitras, University of Connecticut | News | Comments

For years, scientists have studied the potential benefits of a new branch of solar energy technology that relies on incredibly small nanosized antenna arrays that are theoretically capable of harvesting more than 70% of the sun’s electromagnetic radiation and simultaneously converting it into usable electric power. A new fabrication technique developed by University of Connecticut engineering professor Brian Willis could provide the breakthrough for this technology.

NREL, Stanford team up on peel-and-stick solar cells

January 13, 2013 10:48 pm | News | Comments

It may be possible soon to charge cell phones, change the tint on windows, or power small toys with peel-and-stick versions of solar cells. A partnership between Stanford University and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory aims to produce water-assisted transfer printing technologies that support thin-film solar cell production.

Researchers develop new design for concentrator solar cell

November 8, 2012 9:02 am | News | Comments

Engineers in Israel have created a radically new design for a concentrator solar cell that, when irradiated from the side, generates solar conversion efficiencies which rival, and may eventually surpass, the most efficient photovoltaics. The design, the developers say, can exceed 40% conversion efficiency at intensities of 10,000 suns.

24V Line Drivers with Impedance Adaption

October 3, 2012 7:58 am | Product Releases | Comments

The nearly released integrated devices iC-HD2, iC-HD7 and iC-HE from manufacturer iC-Haus are line drivers for 5 V and 24 V industrial encoder/sensor applications. The output drivers are designed for cable impedances in the range of 30 to 140 ohms. The devices feature a unique integrated wave impedance adaption.

Solar cell consists of a single molecule

October 1, 2012 5:39 am | News | Comments

Researchers in Germany and Israel have developed a method to measure photocurrents of a single functionalized photosynthetic protein system. The proteins represent light-driven, highly efficient single-molecule electron pumps that can act as current generators in nanoscale electrical circuits. According to the findings these proteins can be integrated and selectively addressed in artificial photovoltaic device architectures while retaining their biomolecular functional properties.

Hotter might be better at energy-intensive data centers

September 26, 2012 4:43 am | News | Comments

As data centers continue to come under scrutiny for the amount of energy they use, researchers at University of Toronto Scarborough have a suggestion: turn the air conditioning down. Their latest research suggests that turning up the temperature could save energy with little or no increased risk of equipment failure.

Manufacturing changes may increase solar cell production efficiency

September 19, 2012 9:03 am | News | Comments

The competition in the photovoltaics (PV) market is fierce. When it comes to price, Asian manufacturers are frequently ahead of the competition. Now, researchers in Germany are designing new coating processes and thin layer systems that may help reduce the price of solar cells significantly, and change the balance of power in PV.

U.S. research and development most prevalent in small number of regions

September 13, 2012 4:29 am | News | Comments

According to data from a 2008 Business R&D and Innovation Survey by the National Science Foundation, businesses perform the lion's share of their R&D activity in just a small number of geographic areas, particularly the San Jose-San Francisco-Oakland area and the New York-Newark-Bridgeport area.

How to clean up oil spills

September 12, 2012 3:38 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have developed a new technique for magnetically separating oil and water that could be used to clean up oil spills. They believe that, with their technique, the oil could be recovered for use, offsetting much of the cleanup cost.

Self-charging power cell converts, stores energy in single unit

August 22, 2012 3:39 am | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a self-charging power cell that directly converts mechanical energy to chemical energy, storing the power until it is released as electrical current. By eliminating the need to convert mechanical energy to electrical energy for charging a battery, the new hybrid generator-storage cell uses mechanical energy more efficiently than systems using separate generators and batteries.

Engineers damage graphene to make batteries perform far better

August 21, 2012 5:58 am | News | Comments

After making a sheet of “paper” from the world’s thinnest material, graphene, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute scientists zapped it with a laser. The light blemished the ultrathin paper with countless cracks, pores, and other imperfections. The result is a graphene anode material that can be charged or discharged 10 times faster than conventional graphite anodes used in today’s lithium-ion batteries.

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