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The Lead

Could hydrogen vehicles take over as the “green” car of choice?

November 20, 2014 7:59 am | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

Now that car makers have demonstrated through hybrid vehicle success that consumers want less-polluting tailpipes, they are shifting even greener. In 2015, Toyota will roll out the first hydrogen fuel-cell car for personal use that emits only water. An article in Chemical & Engineering Newsexplains how hydrogen could supplant hybrid and electric car technology.

Mars spacecraft reveal comet flyby effects on Martian atmosphere

November 10, 2014 7:46 am | by Jim Scott, CU-Boulder Media Relations | News | Comments

Two NASA and one European spacecraft, including NASA’s MAVEN mission led by the Univ. of...

Shifts in states of matter: It’s complicated

November 7, 2014 3:23 pm | by Anne M. Stark, LLNL | News | Comments

The process of phase changes- those transitions...

Life in Earth’s primordial sea was starved for sulfate

November 7, 2014 3:18 pm | by Univ. of British Columbia | News | Comments

The Earth’s ancient oceans held much lower...

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Greater use of social media gets scientists noticed

November 7, 2014 3:14 pm | by Chris Barncard, Univ. of Wisconsin | News | Comments

Here is an idea worth following: “share” for tenure; “like” to get cited. Academic researchers are turning to social media more and more, according to new research.                          

DNA study dates Eurasian split from East Asians

November 7, 2014 3:08 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The human populations now predominant in Eurasia and East Asia probably split between 36,200 and 45,000 years ago, according to a study released Thursday.                            

Hubble surveys debris-strewn exoplanetary construction yards

November 7, 2014 3:03 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have completed the largest and most sensitive visible-light imaging survey of dusty debris disks around other stars.                         

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Maybe it wasn't the Higgs particle, after all

November 7, 2014 2:58 pm | by Univ. of Southern Denmark | News | Comments

Last year CERN announced the finding of a new elementary particle, the Higgs particle. But, maybe it wasn't the Higgs particle– maybe it just looks like it. And maybe, it is not alone.

Purdue innovation might make MR imaging more effective, less toxic

November 7, 2014 10:17 am | by Purdue Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers led by David Thompson, president of Aten Biotherapeutics and a professor in Purdue's Department of Chemistry, are developing controlled-release imaging agents that allow for a longer, safer imaging session.         

A promising strategy against HIV

November 7, 2014 10:09 am | by B. D. Colen, Harvard Univ. | News | Comments

Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) researchers at Massachusetts General (MGH) and Boston Children’s hospitals (BCH) for the first time have used a relatively new gene-editing technique to create what could prove to be an effective technique for blocking HIV from invading and destroying patients’ immune systems.

New model predicts how traffic will flow

November 7, 2014 10:01 am | by David Chandler, MIT | News | Comments

A reliable way of predicting the flow of traffic could be a great convenience for commuters, as well as a significant energy-saver. Now a team of researchers from MIT, the Univ. of Notre Dame, and elsewhere has devised what they say is an effective and relatively simple formula for making such predictions.

Research lights the way for super-fast computers

November 7, 2014 9:54 am | by Univ. of Surrey | News | Comments

New research demonstrates how glass can be manipulated to create a material that will enable computers to transfer information using light. This development could significantly increase computer processing speeds and power in the future.    

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Thermomagnetic processing method provides path to new materials

November 7, 2014 9:49 am | by ORNL | News | Comments

For much the same reason LCD televisions offer eye-popping performance, a thermomagnetic processing method developed at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory can advance the performance of polymers.           

How to make mobile batteries last longer

November 7, 2014 9:42 am | by Univ. of Luxembourg | News | Comments

Electronic devices waste a lot of energy by producing useless heat. Researchers have made a leap forward in understanding how this happens and how this waste could be reduced by controlling energy flows at a molecular level.        

Satellites assist in Ebola management

November 7, 2014 9:37 am | by UK Space Agency | News | Comments

The UK's International Charter for Space and Major Disasters (the Charter) is an international agreement between space agencies to provide free satellite images in the immediate aftermath of natural or man-made disasters.         

3-D printing a lunar base

November 7, 2014 9:29 am | by European Space Agency | News | Comments

Could astronauts one day be printing rather than building a base on the Moon? In 2013 ESA, working with industrial partners, proved that 3-D printing using lunar material was feasible in principle. Since then, work continues to investigate the technique.

Wind energy reaches greater heights

November 6, 2014 3:14 pm | by Rob Matheson, MIT | News | Comments

Wind turbines across the globe are being made taller to capture more energy from the stronger winds that blow at greater heights. But it’s not easy, or sometimes even economically feasible, to build taller towers, with shipping constraints on tower diameters and the expense involved in construction.

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Synthetic biology for space exploration

November 6, 2014 3:13 pm | by Lynn Yarris, Berkeley Lab | News | Comments

Does synthetic biology hold the key to manned space exploration of the Moon and Mars? Berkeley Lab researchers have used synthetic biology to produce an inexpensive and reliable microbial-based alternative to the world’s most effective anti-malaria drug.

Clearing a path for electrons in polymers

November 6, 2014 2:53 pm | by Univ. of Cambridge | News | Comments

A new class of low-cost polymer materials, which can carry electric charge with almost no losses despite their seemingly random structure, could lead to flexible electronics and displays which are faster and more efficient.

Petrochemical industry technique helps store solar energy

November 6, 2014 2:46 pm | by Dan Stober, Stanford Univ. | News | Comments

Chemical engineers have designed a catalyst that could help produce vast quantities of pure hydrogen through electrolysis – the process of passing electricity through water to break hydrogen loose from oxygen in H2O.         

The origins of multicellular life

November 6, 2014 10:14 am | by Massey Univ. | News | Comments

In groundbreaking research reported in this week’s edition of Nature, researchers from New Zealand, Germany and the United States report the real-time evolution of life forms that have all the hallmarks of multicellular organisms.       

Leading the charge for a panel-powered car

November 6, 2014 10:08 am | by Queensland Univ. of Technology | News | Comments

A car powered by its own body panels could soon be driving on our roads after a breakthrough in nanotechnology research by a Queensland Univ. of Technology team.                          

Golden approach to high-speed DNA reading

November 6, 2014 9:54 am | by Lynn Yarris, Berkeley Lab | News | Comments

Researchers with Berkeley Lab and the Univ. of California (UC) Berkeley have invented a simple, one-step process for producing nanopores in a graphene membrane using the photothermal properties of gold nanorods.            

Cockroach cyborgs use microphones to detect, trace sounds

November 6, 2014 9:47 am | by Matt Shipman, North Carolina State Univ. | News | Comments

North Carolina State Univ. researchers have developed technology that allows cyborg cockroaches, or biobots, to pick up sounds with small microphones and seek out the source of the sound.                  

Diagnostic exhalations

November 6, 2014 9:40 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Paramedics respond to a 911 call to find an elderly patient who’s having difficulty breathing. Anxious and disoriented, the patient has trouble remembering all the medications he’s taking, and with his shortness of breath, speaking is difficult. Is he suffering from acute emphysema or heart failure? Initiating the wrong treatment regimen will increase the patient’s risk of severe complications.

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover finds mineral match

November 5, 2014 9:08 am | by NASA | News | Comments

Reddish rock powder from the first hole drilled into a Martian mountain by NASA's Curiosity rover has yielded the mission's first confirmation of a mineral mapped from orbit. Curiosity collected the powder by drilling into a rock outcrop at the base of Mount Sharp in late September. The robotic arm delivered a pinch of the sample to the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument inside the rover.

SpaceShipTwo’s descent system deployed early

November 3, 2014 10:25 am | by Associated Press, Brian Melley | News | Comments

Federal investigators say they have determined that a space tourism rocket broke apart in flight over California's Mojave Desert after a device to slow the experimental spaceship's descent deployed too soon. While no cause for Friday's crash of SpaceShipTwo has been determined, investigators found the "feathering" system was activated before the craft reached the appropriate speed.

Stratasys, Worrell to accelerate medical device development with 3-D printed injection molds

October 31, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

Stratasys, a leading global provider of 3-D printing and additive manufacturing solutions, has announced its collaboration with design and product development company Worrell to accelerate medical device development through the use of 3-D printed injection molding. Worrell is producing injection molded prototypes using final production materials in 95% less time and at 70% less cost compared with traditional aluminium molds.

Microsoft unveils fitness gadget, health tracking

October 31, 2014 9:17 am | by Anick Jesdanun, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Microsoft is releasing a $199 fitness band that also checks your email and even pays for coffee as the software company seeks to challenge Apple and others in the still-infant market for wearable devices. The Microsoft Band will work with the company's new Microsoft Health system for consolidating health and fitness data from various gadgets and mobile apps.

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