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Wrangling over pesticide ingredients comes to a head in 2015

January 16, 2015 1:06 pm | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

Consumer advocates are fighting a new rule proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency that aims to address concerns over “inert” ingredients, including fragrances and dyes, in pesticides for non-food use. They say the proposal, which could become final this year, doesn’t go far enough to protect human health and the environment from the ingredients’ potential impacts.

ISS evacuated one side during leak scare

January 14, 2015 4:48 pm | by Marcia Dunn, Associated Press | News | Comments

NASA evacuated astronauts from its side of the International Space Station today after an alarm...

Self-driving cars: Lower-cost navigation system developed

January 14, 2015 11:31 am | by Gabe Cherry, Univ. of Michigan | News | Comments

A new software system developed at the Univ. of Michigan uses video game technology to help...

GM to release affordable 200-mile e-Car in 2017

January 12, 2015 10:28 am | by Tom Krisher, Associated Press | News | Comments

General Motors plans to start selling an affordable electric car in 2017 that will be able to go...

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NASA inflates chance of landing astronauts on Mars

January 5, 2015 9:28 am | by Brock Vergakis, Associated Press | News | Comments

Devising a way to one day land astronauts on Mars is a complex problem and NASA scientists think something as simple as a child's toy design may help solve the problem. Safely landing a large spacecraft on the Red planet is just one of many engineering challenges the agency faces as it eyes an ambitious goal of sending humans into deep space later this century.

Researchers: IMF Policies Hindered Ebola Response

December 30, 2014 9:32 am | by Michelle Faul, Associated Press | News | Comments

 Professors from three leading British universities say International Monetary Fund policies favoring international debt repayment over social spending contributed to the Ebola crisis by hampering health care in the three worst-hit West African countries.

Foldscope Beta Testers Share the Wonders of the Microcosmos

December 30, 2014 9:21 am | by Stanford Medicine | News | Comments

The holidays came early for citizen-scientists who received the first batch of Foldscope build-your-own paper microscope kits from Stanford’s Prakash Lab over the last several months. These beta testers have begun sharing a variety of fascinating images, videos, tips and ideas on the Foldscope Explore website.

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How 'The Interview's' VOD Grosses Could Change the Game

December 30, 2014 9:05 am | by Lindsey Bahr, AP Film Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Sony appears to have a win-win with "The Interview." Not only did the studio score a moral victory by releasing the film in the face of hacker threats, the movie made at least $15 million from more than 2 million digital rentals and purchases in its first four days.

Biomedical team creates ‘nerve on a chip’

December 26, 2014 4:04 pm | by Tulane University | News | Comments

Michael J. Moore and J. Lowry Curley first met in the laboratory as professor and student. Now the two Tulane University researchers have started a new biomedical company that’s winning praise and awards.                                        

Taking the grunt work out of Web development

December 26, 2014 3:58 pm | by MIT | News | Comments

A Web page today is the result of a number of interacting components — like cascading style sheets, XML code, ad hoc database queries, and JavaScript functions. For all but the most rudimentary sites, keeping track of how these different elements interact, refer to each other, and pass data back and forth can be a time-consuming chore.

E-readers foil good night’s sleep

December 23, 2014 11:12 am | News | Comments

Use of a light-emitting electronic book (LE-eBook) in the hours before bedtime can adversely impact overall health, alertness and the circadian clock, which synchronizes the daily rhythm of sleep to external environmental time cues, according to Harvard Medical School researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. 

A look at North Korea's limited internet capabilities

December 23, 2014 11:07 am | by Tong-Hyun Kim and Youkyung Lee - Associated Press | News | Comments

An hours-long Internet outage Tuesday in one of the world's least-wired countries was probably more inconvenient to foreigners than to North Korean residents, most of whom have never gone online. Even for wired Koreans south of the heavily armed border separating the rivals, the temporary outage made little difference - southerners are banned by law from accessing North Korean websites.

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Computer scientists extend web browsers to make the internet safer

December 23, 2014 11:01 am | News | Comments

Stanford computer scientists have extended two popular web browsers to make surfing safer while also empowering web developers to deliver creative new services.                                                  

Trapping light with a twister

December 23, 2014 10:55 am | News | Comments

Researchers at MIT who succeeded last year in creating a material that could trap light and stop it in its tracks have now developed a more fundamental understanding of the process.             

Poll: Americans skeptical of commercial drones

December 19, 2014 2:36 pm | by Joan Lowy and Jennifer Agiesta - Associated Press | News | Comments

Americans broadly back tight regulations on commercial drone operators, according to a new Associated Press-GfK poll, as concerns about privacy and safety override the potential benefits of the heralded drone revolution.       

In one aspect of vision, computers catch up to primate brain

December 19, 2014 2:13 pm | News | Comments

For decades, neuroscientists have been trying to design computer networks that can mimic visual skills such as recognizing objects, which the human brain does very accurately and quickly.            

Creating the fastest outdoor wireless internet connection

December 19, 2014 1:46 pm | News | Comments

Lancaster University engineers are to head up a European team working on the world’s first W-band wireless system, heralding the arrival of cost effective, high speed internet everywhere, every time.          

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New horizons for self - assembling materials

December 19, 2014 1:36 pm | News | Comments

Today’s 3-D printers, in which devices rather like inkjet-printer nozzles deposit materials in layers to build up physical objects, are a great tool for designers building prototypes or small companies with limited product runs.      

The power of a trillion light bulbs to map the nano-world

December 18, 2014 3:12 pm | News | Comments

Generating the equivalent of a trillion light bulbs – more power than the whole national grid, but delivered in incredibly short flashes, a new international science facility will give British researchers unprecedented access to the inner working of cells.

Engineering students aim to generate first breathable air on Mars

December 15, 2014 8:32 am | by The Univ. of Western Australia | News | Comments

A project by students from The Univ. of Western Australia and Mars One astronaut candidate Josh Richards has reached the finals of an international competition to land vital experiments on the Red Planet. The Helena Payload project, which aims to generate the first breathable air on Mars, is one of 10 finalists in the Mars One University Competition and is the only successful entry from the southern hemisphere.

Lining up for molecular memory devices

December 12, 2014 11:03 am | by RIKEN | News | Comments

A way to use weak molecular bonding interactions to create well-ordered and stable metal–organic monolayers with optoelectronic properties has been found by researchers from the RIKEN Surface and Interface Science Laboratory.        

Robot 'shadow hand'

December 12, 2014 10:57 am | by ESA | News | Comments

ESA is developing technologies for advanced human–machine interaction to transfer the human sense of touch to space.                                       

Neutron CT helps solve battery fire puzzle

December 12, 2014 10:43 am | by Daniel Hussey, NIST | News | Comments

Earlier this month, the NTSB released its Aircraft Incident Report on a fire aboard a Japan Airlines Boeing 787, concluding that the fire was probably caused by an internal short circuit within a cell of the lithium-ion battery.       

Seed grants awarded for innovative energy research

December 12, 2014 10:37 am | by Mark Shwartz and Mark Golden, Stanford University | News | Comments

Stanford University's Precourt Institute for Energy, Precourt Energy Efficiency Center and TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy have awarded eight seed grants totaling about $1.5 million for promising new research in clean technology and energy efficiency.

Interstellar mystery solved by supercomputer simulations

December 11, 2014 2:48 pm | by Jorge Salazar, TACC | News | Comments

An interstellar mystery of why stars form has been solved thanks to the most realistic supercomputer simulations of galaxies yet made.                                 

Theory details how ‘hot’ monomers affect thin-film formation

December 11, 2014 2:43 pm | by Mike Williams, Rice University | News | Comments

Researchers at Rice and the University of Maryland led by Rice theoretical physicist Alberto Pimpinelli devised the first detailed model to quantify what they believe was the last unknown characteristic of film formation through deposition by vacuum sublimation and chemical vapor deposition.

Stacking 2-D materials may lower cost of semiconductor devices

December 11, 2014 2:34 pm | by North Caroline State University | News | Comments

A team of researchers led by North Carolina State University has found that  stacking materials that are only one atom thick can create semiconductor junctions that transfer charge efficiently, regardless of whether the crystalline structure of the materials is mismatched.

New technology tracks carcinogens as they move through the body

December 11, 2014 12:17 pm | by Oregon State University | News | Comments

Researchers for the first time have developed a method to track through the human body the movement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs, as extraordinarily tiny amounts of these potential carcinogens are biologically processed and eliminated.

Ebola vaccine trial suspended after side effects

December 11, 2014 12:12 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Swiss researchers have suspended the testing of one of the leading Ebola vaccine candidates after some volunteers reported unexpected side effects.                             

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