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Manhattan Project scientist Cowan dies at 92

April 23, 2012 8:29 am | by Susan Montoya Bryan, Associated Press | News | Comments

One of the few people to know the various components of the first atomic bombs, George Cowan would become one of the leading nuclear researchers in the country and a fixture at Los Alamos National Laboratory for nearly 40 years. Still working with nonprofit science institute he helped found, he died Friday as the result of a fall at his home.

Cyber security exercise puts laboratories to the test

April 13, 2012 4:40 am | News | Comments

Recently, Los Alamos National Laboratory hosted an information security exercise dubbed "Eventide" that put more than 100 participants from around the country into a maelstrom of sensitive data leaks and cracked network security. It’s hoped such trials by fire prepare the Department of Energy’s facilities to cope with eventual compromises of cyber integrity.

Magnetic field researchers achieve hundred-tesla goal

March 23, 2012 8:58 am | News | Comments

During a six-experiment pulse this week, the previous world record for laboratory-produced magnetic fields was broken by Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers. The hundred-tesla field, about 2 million times Earth’s magnetic field was produced with the help of a 1,200-MJ motor generator.

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Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione

March 5, 2012 3:40 am | News | Comments

Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists and an international research team have announced discovery of molecular oxygen ions in the upper-most atmosphere of Dione, one of the 62 known moons orbiting the ringed planet. The research was made possible by instruments aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft, which was launched in 1997.

LEDs go ultraviolet with nanocrystal core

February 27, 2012 3:49 am | News | Comments

A multinational team of scientists has developed a process for creating glass-based, inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that produce light in the ultraviolet range. If successfully integrated into biomedical devices, these would be the first robust, cheap to produce, and chemically stable LEDs to operate in the medically-useful UV spectrum.

Mysterious electron acceleration explained

February 27, 2012 2:48 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT News Office | News | Comments

A mysterious phenomenon detected by space probes has finally been explained, thanks to a massive computer simulation that was able to precisely align with details of spacecraft observations. The finding could not only solve an astrophysical puzzle, but might also lead to a better ability to predict high-energy electron streams in space that could damage satellites.

Tiny quantum dots hold promise for future source of lighting

January 12, 2012 3:25 am | News | Comments

University of Texas at Dallas researchers are making strides in understanding the workings of quantum dots. These nanosized particles could be used in a variety of ways ranging from illuminating the human body in high-tech medical imaging to increasing the efficiency of energy sources.

Nanotube 'glow sticks' transform surface science tool kit

January 11, 2012 3:48 am | News | Comments

Many physical and chemical processes necessary for biology and chemistry occur at the interface of water and solid surfaces. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have now shown that semiconducting carbon nanotubes have the potential to detect and track single molecules in water.

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Economy, Energy, and Entrepreneurship

December 15, 2011 4:13 am | by R&D Editors | Articles | Comments

Federally funded research can be a solution to some of the nation's top challenges, say government laboratory executives.

Economy, Energy, and Entrepreneurship: Los Alamos National Laboratory

December 15, 2011 3:54 am | by R&D Editors | Articles | Comments

Los Alamos National Laboratory's David Pesiri speaks on topics including funding, peer review, entrepreneurship, nanotechnology research, and communicating research missions in a social networking environment.

Proton beam experiments open new areas of research

December 5, 2011 3:34 am | News | Comments

By focusing proton beams using high-intensity lasers, a team of scientists have discovered a new way to heat material and create new states of matter in the laboratory.

Christmas burst reveals neutron star collision

December 2, 2011 3:14 am | News | Comments

A strangely powerful, long-lasting gamma-ray burst on Christmas Day, 2010 has finally been analyzed to the satisfaction of a multinational research team. Called the Christmas Burst, GRB 101225A was freakishly lengthy and it produced radiation at unusually varying wavelengths.

Los Alamos instrument to shine light on Mars habitability

November 29, 2011 4:51 am | News | Comments

With the successful launch of the Mars Science Laboratory on Saturday, Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers and scientists from the French space institute IRAP are poised to begin focusing the energy of a million light bulbs on the surface of the Red Planet to help determine whether Mars was or is habitable.  

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Is sustainability science really a science?

November 28, 2011 4:07 am | News | Comments

The idea that one can create a field of science out of thin air—just because of societal and policy need—is a bold concept. But for the emerging field of sustainability science, sorting among theoretical and applied scientific disciplines, making sense of potentially divergent theory, practice, and policy, the gamble has paid off.

DOE captures fugitives to reduce its carbon emissions

November 16, 2011 10:00 am | News | Comments

In terms of emissions, just one pound of sulfur hexafluoride, a nontoxic gas used in electric insulation, is equivalent to about 11 tons of carbon dioxide. Energy Department experts are hunting down this and other fugitive carbon emissions and have already prevented the release of 600,000 metric tons of carbon equivalent.

Antibody library project could unlock mysteries of human gene function

November 1, 2011 11:10 am | News | Comments

A National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to Los Alamos National Laboratory  Bioscience Division could help unravel the gnarly secrets of how many human genes function. With the new NIH Common Fund grant of more than $4 million, researchers led by Andrew Bradbury aim to develop an automated pipeline to generate antibodies against human gene products, without using animals.

LANL completes CRADA with Biomagnetics Diagnostics

September 30, 2011 8:37 am | News | Comments

Los Alamos National Laboratory successfully completed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Biomagnetics Diagnostics Inc., in June 2011. The CRADA followed the licensing to Biomagnetics of a LANL-developed prototype waveguide-based optical biosensor.

Los Alamos achieves world-record pulsed magnetic field

August 23, 2011 11:24 am | News | Comments

A research team at Los Alamos National Laboratory have set a new world record for the strongest magnetic field produced by a nondestructive magnet. They achieved a field of 92.5 tesla on Aug. 18, taking back a record that had been held by a team of German scientists. Then they surpassed the record again the next day.

Price is right for better nuclear fuel

August 14, 2011 8:00 pm | Award Winners

A new chemical thorium extraction process from Los Alamos National Laboratory circumvents hazardous chemicals and high prices normally associated with the production of this highly efficient nuclear fuel.

Fluid additive prevents oil-well blowouts

August 14, 2011 8:00 pm | Award Winners

When added to spacer drilling fluid in the casings of deepwater oil wells, the TAPSS: Trapped Annular Pressure Shrinking Spacer product causes the fluids underground to shrink, counteracting the potentially devastating effects of thermal expansion.

Using neutrons to spy on the elusive hydronium ion

August 8, 2011 8:47 am | News | Comments

A Los Alamos National Laboratory research team has harnessed neutrons to view for the first time the critical role that an elusive molecule plays in certain biological reactions. The effort could aid in treatment of peptic ulcers or acid reflux disease, or allow for more efficient conversion of woody waste into transportation fuels.

Researchers find potential key for unlocking biomass energy

July 20, 2011 6:35 am | News | Comments

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory and Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center have found a potential key for unlocking the energy potential from non-edible biomass materials such as corn leaves and stalks, or switch grass.

Fire threat fades for Los Alamos as NASA measures pollution

July 5, 2011 8:03 am | by P. Solomon Banda, Associated Press, and NASA | News | Comments

A smattering of summer rain gave a boost to firefighters battling a huge forest fire near Los Alamos, letting officials lift an evacuation ban and putting the national laboratory on track to open Wednesday. The challenges aren’t over, however, as New Mexico and Arizona will likely be dealing with low-level ozone and poor air quality from the fires.

Towns near NM fire, nuclear lab wary of smoke

June 29, 2011 9:12 am | by P. Solomon Banda and Susan Montoya Bryan, Associated Press | News | Comments

Los Alamos, both the town and the laboratory of the same name, remains evacuated as a major wildfire spreads has reached the roadway just outside some of the laboratory’s property. Top lab officials and fire managers said they're confident the flames won't reach key buildings or areas where radioactive waste is stored, but some residents remained concerned for the safety of their families and nearby communities.

New Mexico fire threatens Los Alamos lab

June 27, 2011 5:10 am | News | Comments

The U.S. Dept. of Energy lab was forced to shut down its operations Monday as both workers and residents were kept out of harm’s way of a wind-driven wildfires. According to officials, all radioactive and hazardous materials at the long-time defense research site were being protected.

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