Advertisement
Global R&D Funding Forecast
Subscribe to Global R&D Funding Forecast
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

From the lab to the dentist office

August 21, 2013 7:34 am | by Rob Matheson, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Traditionally, dentists have made dental impressions by having patients bite down on a moldable silicone material. Such impressions, however, can be uncomfortable and inaccurate. In the early 2000s, a group of researchers from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard Univ. began working to commercialize a novel handheld scanner that could digitally capture 3-D images of the inside of a patient’s mouth.

Heat waves to become more frequent, severe

August 20, 2013 10:31 am | News | Comments

Climate change is set to trigger more frequent and severe heat waves in the next 30 years regardless of the amount of carbon dioxide we emit into the atmosphere, a new study has shown. Extreme heat waves such as those that hit the U.S. in 2012 and Australia in 2009—dubbed three-sigma events by the researchers—are projected to cover double the amount of global land by 2020 and quadruple by 2040.

Little critters, big energy

August 20, 2013 7:58 am | News | Comments

Tennessee scientists are using one of Earth’s smallest creatures to solve some of the government’s biggest bioenergy problems. For the next three years, a $2.1 million grant is allowing researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to use a process called microbial electrolysis to transform plant biomass into hydrogen to produce energy-rich biofuel for use in combustion engines.

Advertisement

New study reveals regional concentration of U.S. scientists and engineers

August 20, 2013 12:39 am | News | Comments

According to a recently published report by the National Science Foundation, reveals regional concentration of scientists and engineers in the United States, science and engineering (S&E) employment is geographically concentrated in a small number of states. Further, several major metropolitan areas within these states account for the highest S&E employment.

ORNL team uses lignin to power green battery

August 19, 2013 8:24 am | News | Comments

Lignin is a waste material that is produced when paper is manufactured from wood. Instead of disposing of the lignin, a research team at the U.S. Dept. of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory has learned how to take the material and convert it into powering a green battery.

Electronic warfare development targets fully adaptive threat response technology

August 19, 2013 8:17 am | News | Comments

When U.S pilots encounter enemy air defenses, onboard electronic warfare (EW) systems protect them by interfering with incoming radar signals: a technique known as electronic attack (EA) or jamming. Conversely, electronic protection technology prevents hostile forces from using EA methods to disable U.S. radar equipment assets. A research team is now developing a new generation of advanced radio frequency jammer technology.

Reducing computer viruses in health networks

August 19, 2013 8:04 am | by Nicole Casal Moore, University of Michigan | News | Comments

The hospital IT networks and medical devices that doctors rely on to treat patients are susceptible to their own maladies: computer viruses and other malware. Whether a bug accidentally finds its way into a system, or an attacker intentionally injects one, researchers believe such breaches are happening more often with the growth of technology such as cloud computing. A national team is at work to improve the cybersecurity of these systems.

Researchers work on missile-defense software

August 19, 2013 7:56 am | News | Comments

Purdue Univ. researchers are peering into the future to help the U.S. foil enemy missile attacks. Working with the U.S. Missile Defense Agency, the research team is creating software that makes it possible to pose various "what-if" questions; scenarios that explore plausible future missile advances in adversarial nations and the defensive capability of the U.S.

Advertisement

Rechargeable flow battery enables cheaper, large-scale energy storage

August 19, 2013 7:38 am | by Jennifer Chu, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have engineered a new rechargeable flow battery that doesn’t rely on expensive membranes to generate and store electricity. The device, they say, may one day enable cheaper, large-scale energy storage. The palm-sized prototype generates three times as much power per square centimeter as other membraneless systems.

Image-processing 1,000 times faster

August 15, 2013 7:50 am | News | Comments

Loosely inspired by a biological brain's approach to making sense of visual information, a Univ. of Michigan researcher is leading a project to build alternative computer hardware that could process images and video 1,000 times faster with 10,000 times less power than today's systems—all without sacrificing accuracy.

Wyss Institute’s “Organ-on-a-Chip” to test radiation exposure therapies

August 14, 2013 6:02 pm | News | Comments

The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard Univ. has received a $5.6 million grant award from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to use its Organs-on-Chips technology to test human physiological responses to radiation. The project will investigate if the microfluidic devices lined by living human cells can be used instead of animals to evaluate the efficacy and safety of medical treatments for radiation sickness.

Science is harnessing shock waves to create new materials

August 12, 2013 1:42 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at Purdue Univ. are part of a national effort to develop new materials having super strength and other properties by using shock waves similar to those generated by meteorites striking the Earth. A new center has been established specifically for this type of investigation, and its primary mission is to predict shock conditions under which new materials can be synthesized.

New findings in the transmission of viruses

August 12, 2013 10:50 am | News | Comments

Outbreaks such as the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS) have afflicted people around the world, yet many people think these trends are on the decline. Quite the opposite is true. The efforts to combat this epidemic are being spearheaded by a team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists.

Advertisement

Faster, more powerful mobile devices

August 12, 2013 8:12 am | News | Comments

The next generation of smartphones could be capable of storing 250 hours of high-definition video and carrying a charge for a week, thanks to an advanced data storage technology from a Univ. of Michigan startup that could upend the memory market. Crossbar Inc., which licensed the technology from U-M in 2010, recently announced it has developed a working resistive random access memory prototype in a commercial fabrication facility.

Targeting product design for the developing world

August 12, 2013 7:37 am | by Jennifer Chu, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Designing products for the developing world can be a hit-or-miss endeavor: While there may be a dire need for products addressing problems, such as access to clean water, sanitation and electricity, designing a product that consumers will actually buy is a complicated process. More often than not, such products go unused due to poor quality, unreliability or differences in cultural expectations.

NOAA report card for 2012's climate: More warming

August 7, 2013 8:04 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

A new massive federal study says the world in 2012 sweltered with continued signs of climate change. Rising sea levels, snowmelt, heat buildup in the oceans, and melting Arctic sea ice and Greenland ice sheets, all broke or nearly broke records, but temperatures only sneaked into the top 10.

Study finds price of wind energy in the U.S. near all-time low

August 7, 2013 7:30 am | News | Comments

Annual wind power additions in the U.S. achieved record levels in 2012, while wind energy pricing is near an all-time low. Roughly 13.1 GW of new wind power capacity were connected to the U.S. grid in 2012, well above the previous high in 2009, and motivated by the scheduled expiration of federal tax incentives at the end of 2012.

SRI, NEDO collaborate to accelerate innovation

August 6, 2013 11:01 am | News | Comments

SRI International and the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO), Japan's largest public R&D management organization, are establishing a collaborative program to identify and nurture promising research projects to result in building successful startup companies in Japan.

Improved innovative performance through production offshoring

August 6, 2013 10:55 am | by Management Center Innsbruck | News | Comments

In the last few decades, European companies have moved much of their manufacturing abroad. A joint study produced by Austrian Institute of Technology and the Management Center Innsbruck shows that such companies spend significantly more on R&D or product design, and invest more in process innovation than non-offshoring firms.

China investing billions in bid to catch up with Western pharma

August 6, 2013 10:41 am | by Lux Research | News | Comments

China’s biomedical sector is rapidly transforming itself from a manufacturing base to an innovation hub, investing billions of dollars and setting up innovation centers in a bid to catch up with the west by the end of the 12th Five-Year Plan, according to Lux Research.

Localized wind power blowing more near homes

August 6, 2013 10:11 am | News | Comments

Americans are increasingly installing wind turbines near their homes, farms and businesses to generate their own energy, concludes a new report released by the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE). The 2012 Market Report on Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications is the first comprehensive analysis on a growing field called distributed wind.

Battelle team wins DARPA contract to build medical device to treat sepsis

August 6, 2013 9:48 am | News | Comments

At Battelle, supporting America’s military personnel is woven into the fabric of its business. In that pursuit, a team consisting of Battelle, NxStage Medical Inc. and Aethlon Medical has won a contract from DARPA to develop an innovative, new medical device that may save the lives of soldiers—and civilians as well—by treating sepsis.

LANL announces Express Licensing program

August 6, 2013 9:41 am | News | Comments

With the launch of a new “Express Licensing” program, access to innovative technology invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has gotten easier. The new licensing alternative was announced by David Pesiri, Dir. of LANL’s Technology Transfer Div.

South Korea approves $6 million in aid for North Korea

August 6, 2013 9:01 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

South Korea has approved $6 million in government aid for vaccines, medical care and food for North Korean children, officials said Tuesday, the first such humanitarian aid for Pyongyang since South Korean President Park Geun-hye took office in February.

Univ. Of Maryland, Baltimore's licensing deals fuel local life sciences community

August 6, 2013 8:30 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Univ. of Maryland Ventures announced agreements between Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore and five different life sciences companies across the Baltimore/Washington metropolitan region. The companies include Rexahn Pharmaceuticals, Plasmonix, IGI Technologies, A&G Pharmaceuticals and BioAssay Works.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading