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Governments mining Google for more personal data

November 14, 2013 2:50 pm | News | Comments

Google has become less likely to comply with government demands for its users' online communications and other activities as authorities in the U.S. and other countries become more aggressive about mining the Internet for personal data. Legal requests from governments for people’s data have risen 21% from the last half of last year.

Next generation of biofuels is still years away

November 14, 2013 12:54 pm | by Jonathan Fahey, Associated Press | News | Comments

The first trickle of fuels made from agricultural waste is finally winding its way into the nation's energy supply. But the full benefits of this fuel source remain many years away, and ethanol, which was meant to be a stop-gap until non-food sources of fuel were found, has been far more damaging to the environment than the government predicted.

Prairies vanish in the U.S. push for green energy

November 13, 2013 11:15 am | by Chet Brokaw and Jack Gillum, Associated Press | News | Comments

Across the Dakotas and Nebraska, more than 1 million acres of the Great Plains are giving way to cornfields as farmers transform the wild expanse that once served as the backdrop for American pioneers. This expansion of the Corn Belt is fueled in part by America's green energy policy, which requires oil companies to blend billions of gallons of corn ethanol into their gasoline.

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From knee to neuron, offspring of Yale’s 3-D printers multiply

November 12, 2013 8:34 am | News | Comments

Yale Univ. neuroscientist Gordon Shepherd has studied neurons for decades. But until recently he’d never had a neuron he could grasp with his own two hands: Neurons are much too small. Now he’s got his very own 3-D neuron in all its spidery glory, a vastly enlarged but precise replica that is the latest custom-made anatomical model to emerge from the Yale Center for Engineering Innovation and Design (CEID).

Study: Better police surveillance technologies come with a cost

November 11, 2013 2:07 pm | by Phil Ciciora, Business & Law Editor, Univ. of Illinois | News | Comments

The widespread use of advanced surveillance technologies by state and local police departments will improve the efficiency of criminal investigations. But a lack of oversight and regulation poses significant privacy concerns, warns Stephen Rushin, a professor of law at the Univ. of Illinois.

Japan starts up offshore wind farm near Fukushima

November 11, 2013 6:41 am | by ELAINE KURTENBACH - AP Business Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Japan switched on the first turbine at a wind farm 20 km (12 miles) off the coast of Fukushima, feeding electricity to the grid tethered to the tsunami-crippled nuclear plant onshore. The wind farm near the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant is to eventually have a generation capacity of 1 GW from 143 turbines.

French out-tough U.S. over Iran nuclear program

November 10, 2013 12:49 pm | by JAMEY KEATEN - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

When Iran appeared close to a preliminary deal with world powers over its nuclear program, France stepped up to say: Not so fast — a surprise move that exposed divisions among the United States and other Western negotiators who had long been in lockstep on the issue.

Georgia Tech launches new robotics institute

November 8, 2013 7:00 am | News | Comments

The Georgia Institute of Technology has announced the launch of its Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (IRM), the newest of Georgia Tech’s 10 Interdisciplinary Research Institutes. IRIM brings together robotics researchers from across campus—spanning colleges, departments and individual labs—to support and connect research initiatives, enhance educational programs and foster advances for the National Robotics Initiative.

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New ion source for focused ion beams uses cold atomic beam

October 21, 2013 8:49 am | News | Comments

Researchers from the NIST and zeroK Nanotech Corp. have demonstrated a new ion source that may enable focused ion beams with high brightness and resolution for nanoscale fabrication and measurement applications in fields ranging from semiconductor manufacturing to biotechnology. Working under a CRADA, the researchers have constructed the first prototype of a low-temperature ion source.

Government reopens after Congress ends 16-day shutdown

October 17, 2013 9:01 am | by Andrew Taylor, Associated Press | News | Comments

The government reopened its doors after a battle-weary Congress approved a bipartisan measure to end a 16-day partial shutdown and avert the possibility of an economy-jarring default on U.S. obligations. Early Thursday, President Barack Obama signed the measure ending a brawl with Republicans who tried to use the must-pass legislation to mount a last-ditch effort to derail the president's landmark health care law.

Study: Renewable fuel standard needs to be modified, not repealed

October 15, 2013 8:06 am | News | Comments

Congress should minimally modify—and not, as petroleum-related interests have increasingly lobbied for, repeal—the Renewable Fuel Standard (RSF), the most comprehensive renewable energy policy in the U.S., according to a new paper from two Univ. of Illinois researchers. In the study, the researchers argue that RFS mandates merely ought to be adjusted to reflect current and predicted biofuel commercialization realities.

Scotland demonstrates its collaborative approach to cell therapy development

October 14, 2013 9:01 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

  Scotland announced that leading industry players, Sistemic and Roslin Cells, are going to work together with Scottish Development International to make the process of undertaking clinical trials in cell therapy easier, faster and more successful in reaching commercial realization.

Ford, Univ. of Michigan open new battery lab

October 14, 2013 8:06 am | by Dee-Ann Durbin, Associated Press | News | Comments

Ford Motor Co. and the Univ. of Michigan are opening a new battery research and manufacturing laboratory that they hope will speed the development of batteries for electric and hybrid cars. The center, on the university's campus in Ann Arbor, will bring together battery makers, car companies and researchers who will test new batteries for prototype vehicles.

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Proof: R&D Investment Pays Off

October 11, 2013 11:30 am | by Laura Gaze, Director, PR & Thought Leadership, Intellectual Property & Science, Thomson Reuters | Articles | Comments

Thomson Reuters announced its 2013 Top 100 Global Innovators this week, a list of the who’s who in innovation based on a series of proprietary patent metrics using its Derwent World Patents Index database. The 2013 honorees comprise many of the likely suspects: AT&T, Apple, Google, Ford, L’Oreal and Microsoft, as well as some that aren’t so likely: Alcatel Lucent, Blackberry and Ericsson.

Creating a permanent bacteria barrier

October 11, 2013 9:35 am | by Rob Matheson, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Any medical device implanted in the body attracts bacteria to its surface, causing infections and thrombosis that lead to many deaths annually. Devices can be coated with antibiotics and blood thinners, but these eventually dissolve, limiting their longevity and effectiveness. Now, Semprus BioSciences is developing a novel biomaterial for implanted medical devices that barricades these troublesome microbes from the device’s surface.

EU urges “closer ties” between science and industry

October 11, 2013 8:52 am | News | Comments

Bridging the gap between research institutes and enterprise is central to advance innovation and competitiveness in Europe, argue European Union (EU) officials and industry leaders. But how to get these separate orbiting planets acquainted with one another was the subject of heated debate at the 5th European Innovation Summit, held in Brussels.

Achieving an innovation nation

September 25, 2013 7:42 am | by Peter Dizikes, MIT News Office | News | Comments

The U.S. economy retains myriad sources of innovative capacity; but not enough of the innovations occurring in America today reach the marketplace, according to a major two-year Massachusetts Institute of Technology study. The report found that potentially valuable innovations occur throughout the advanced manufacturing sector and in companies of all sizes, from multinational conglomerates to specialized “Main Street” firms.

Researchers seek to control prosthetic legs with neural signals

September 23, 2013 8:09 am | News | Comments

Most people don’t think about the difference between walking across the room and walking up a flight of stairs. Their brains (and their legs) automatically adjust to the new conditions. But for people using prosthetic legs, there is no automatic link between their bodies and the prosthetics that they need to negotiate the new surroundings.

NSF report details increase in business research and development

September 20, 2013 12:25 pm | News | Comments

According to a recent study published by the National Science Foundation (NSF), businesses spent more on research and development (R&D) in 2011 than they did in 2010. The figures revealed that during 2011, companies in manufacturing industries performed $201 billion, or 68%, of domestic R&D.

Fuel-efficient cars, planes cheaper with magnesium drawn from ocean

September 20, 2013 8:20 am | News | Comments

A lightweight metal that reduces fuel use in cars and planes could be extracted from the ocean through a unique process being developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The process could ultimately make fuel-efficient transportation more affordable and expand the American magnesium market.

NRL achieves highest open-circuit voltage for quantum dot solar cells

September 13, 2013 12:05 pm | News | Comments

Using colloidal lead sulfide nanocrystal quantum dot (QD) substances, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) research scientists and engineers have recorded an open-circuit voltage of 692 mV using the QD bandgap of a 1.4 eV under one-sun illumination. The achievement highlights the potential for improvements in QD solar cells by employing smaller quantum dots.

Nation's bloated nuclear spending comes under fire

September 13, 2013 12:45 am | by JERI CLAUSING - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

At Los Alamos National Laboratory, a seven-year, $213 million upgrade to the security system that protects the laboratory's most sensitive nuclear bomb-making facilities doesn't work. Those same facilities, which sit atop a fault line, remain susceptible to collapse and dangerous radiation releases, despite millions more spent on improvement plans.

Hydroelectric power makes big comeback at U.S. dams

September 12, 2013 9:20 am | by David Pitt, Associated Press | News | Comments

In the 1980s and 1990s, hydroelectric development stagnated as environmental groups lobbied against it and a long regulatory process required years of environmental study. But for the first time in decades, power companies are proposing new projects to take advantage of government financial incentives, policies that promote renewable energy over fossil fuels and efforts to streamline the permit process.

GIEC signs MOU with Pakistan universities to enhance scientific cooperation

September 11, 2013 11:52 am | News | Comments

Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences (GIEC) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Univ. of Agriculture Faisalabad, Pakistan and the Univ. of Engineering & Technology Lahore, Pakistan in Lahore to enhance scientific cooperation and the exchange of scientists, young scholars and technicians between the two sides.

Report: Quality of science, engineering at National Security Labs is solid

September 11, 2013 11:38 am | News | Comments

The science and engineering capabilities that underpin the nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship and nonproliferation missions at the nation’s three national security laboratories are “healthy and vibrant,” says a new report from the National Research Council.  The committee that wrote the report found no problems with the quality of science and engineering that would prevent certification of the stockpile.

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