Advertisement
Space
Subscribe to Space
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Wisconsin scientists help search for alien life

February 13, 2013 3:36 am | by CARRIE ANTLFINGER - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison are helping search for evidence of alien life not by looking into outer space, but by studying some rocks right here on Earth. Some of the rocks are up to 3.5 billion years old. The scientists are looking for crucial information to understand how life might have arisen elsewhere in the universe and guide the search for life on Mars one day.

U.N. agency moves to kill aircraft battery exemption

February 12, 2013 11:08 am | by JOAN LOWY - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A U.N. agency that sets global aviation safety standards is moving to prevent aircraft batteries like the one that caught fire on a Boeing 787 last month from being shipped as cargo on passenger planes, people familiar with the effort said.

Curiosity rover completes first drill into Mars rock

February 11, 2013 8:32 am | by Alicia Chang, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

In a Mars first, the Curiosity rover drilled into a rock and prepared to dump an aspirin-sized pinch of powder into its onboard laboratories for closer inspection. Using the drill at the end of its 7-foot-long robotic arm, Curiosity on Friday chipped away at a flat, veined rock bearing numerous signs of past water flow.  The exercise was so complex that engineers spent several days commanding Curiosity to tap the rock outcrop, drill test holes and perform a "mini-drill" in anticipation of the real show.

Advertisement

US: 787 battery approval should be reconsidered

February 7, 2013 7:15 pm | by JOAN LOWY - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The U.S. government should reassess its safety approval of the Boeing 787's lithium ion batteries, America's top accident investigator said Thursday, casting doubt on whether the airliner's troubles can be remedied quickly.

Closest Earth-like planet “stroll across park”

February 7, 2013 9:50 am | by Marcia Dunn, AP Aerospace Writer | News | Comments

Earth-like worlds may be closer and more plentiful than anyone imagined. Astronomers reported Wednesday that the nearest Earth-like planet may be just 13 light-years away—or some 77 trillion miles. That planet hasn't been found yet, but should be there based on the team's study of red dwarf stars. Galactically speaking, that's right next door.

NTSB: Plane batteries not necessarily unsafe

February 6, 2013 12:20 pm | by JOAN LOWY - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The use of lithium ion batteries to power aircraft systems isn't necessarily unsafe despite a battery fire in one Boeing 787 Dreamliner and smoke in another, but manufacturers need to build in reliable safeguards, the nation's top aviation safety investigator said Wednesday.

Supersonic skydiver reached 844 mph in record jump

February 5, 2013 8:14 am | by Marcia Dunn, AP Aerospace Writer | News | Comments

Supersonic skydiver Felix Baumgartner was faster than he or anyone else thought during his record-setting jump last October from 24 miles up. The Austrian parachutist known as "Fearless Felix" reached 843.6 mph, according to official numbers released Monday. That's equivalent to Mach 1.25, or 1.25 times the speed of sound. His top speed initially was estimated at 10 mph slower at 834 mph, or Mach 1.24.

AP Exclusive: 787 grounded, but batteries can fly

February 3, 2013 4:34 am | by JOAN LOWY - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

At the time the government certified Boeing's 787 Dreamliners as safe, federal rules barred the type of batteries used to power the airliner's electrical systems from being carried as cargo on passenger planes because of the fire risk. Now the situation is reversed.

Advertisement

U.S. satellite lost in failed launch from Pacific

February 1, 2013 4:44 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Sea Launch AG says a U.S. communications satellite was lost after a booster rocket carrying it into space failed shortly after its launch from a floating platform in the Pacific. The company said in a statement Friday the Intelsat 27 satellite was lost 40 seconds after the launch due to the failure of the Zenit-3SL rocket.

Japan to send investigators to US for 787 probe

January 31, 2013 10:55 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Japan's Civil Aviation Bureau is sending investigators looking into problems with Boeing 787 batteries to Seattle, where the aircraft are assembled. The Transport Ministry said members of the team working on the investigation would leave Tokyo on Sunday for Seattle. It provided no further details.

Researchers develop model for identifying habitable zones around stars

January 31, 2013 8:11 am | News | Comments

Researchers searching the galaxy for planets that could pass the litmus test of sustaining water-based life must find whether those planets fall in what’s known as a habitable zone. New work, led by a team of Penn State University researchers, will help scientists in that search.

Boeing sticks to production plans, battery for 787

January 30, 2013 3:34 pm | by JOSHUA FREED - AP Business Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Boeing is sticking with plans to speed up production of its 787 and sees no reason to change the lithium-ion battery design at the center of the troubled plane's problems, its CEO said Wednesday. Boeing's full-speed-ahead approach comes even as it became clear that airlines were replacing 787 batteries more often than Boeing had expected.

Ridges on Mars suggest ancient flowing water

January 29, 2013 3:57 pm | News | Comments

Ridges in impact craters on Mars appear to be fossils of cracks in the Martian surface, formed by minerals deposited by flowing water. Water flowing beneath the surface suggests life may once have been possible on Mars.

Advertisement

NASA testing vintage engine from Apollo 11 rocket

January 28, 2013 9:46 am | by Jay Reeves, Associated Press | News | Comments

Young engineers who weren't even born when the last Saturn V rocket took off for the moon are testing a vintage engine from the Apollo program. The engine, known to NASA engineers as No. F-6049, was grounded because of a glitch during a test in Mississippi and later sent to the Smithsonian Institution. Now, NASA engineers are using to get ideas on how to develop the next generation of rockets for future missions to the moon and beyond.

Boeing 787 probe shifts to monitoring system maker

January 28, 2013 1:08 am | by YURI KAGEYAMA - AP Business Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The joint U.S. and Japanese investigation into the Boeing 787's battery problems has shifted from the battery-maker to the manufacturer of a monitoring system. Japan transport ministry official Shigeru Takano said Monday the probe into battery-maker GS Yuasa was over for now as no evidence was found it was the source of the problems.

U.S. officials defend handling of Boeing 787 mishaps

January 23, 2013 4:10 pm | by JOAN LOWY - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Obama administration officials struggled Wednesday to defend their initial statements that the Boeing 787 is safe while promising a transparent probe of mishaps involving the aircraft's batteries. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood stood by his Jan. 11 assertion that the 787, Boeing's newest and most technologically advanced airliner, was safe.

Revolutionary theory of dark matter

January 23, 2013 7:51 am | News | Comments

The universe abounds with dark matter. Nobody knows what it consists of. Now, University of Oslo physicists have launched a very hard mathematical explanation that could solve the mystery once and for all.

New evidence indicates auroras occur outside our solar system

January 21, 2013 3:35 pm | News | Comments

University of Leicester planetary scientists have found new evidence suggesting auroras—similar to Earth's Aurora Borealis—occur on bodies outside our solar system. Auroras occur on several planets within our solar system, and the brightest—on Jupiter—are 100 times brighter than those on Earth. However, no auroras have yet been observed beyond Neptune.

Martian crater may once have held groundwater-fed lake

January 21, 2013 11:46 am | News | Comments

New information coming from researchers analyzing spectrometer data from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), which looked down on the floor of McLaughlin Crater on the Red Planet’s surface, suggests the formation of the carbonates and clay in a groundwater-fed lake within the closed basin of the crater. The depth of the crater may have helped allow the lake to form.

Boeing investigation turns to battery maker

January 21, 2013 4:13 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Japanese and U.S. investigators are conducting a probe of the maker of the lithium ion batteries used in Boeing's grounded 787 jets. Tsutomu Nishijima, a spokesman for GS Yuasa, said Monday that the investigators visited the company's headquarters in Kyoto, Japan and that Yuasa was cooperating with the probe.

Aviation technology advances, U.S. tries to keep up

January 20, 2013 2:22 pm | by DAVID KOENIG - AP Airlines Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The battery that caught fire in a Japan Airlines 787 in Boston last week was not overcharged, but U.S. investigators said Sunday there could still be problems with wiring or other charging components. An examination of the flight data recorder indicated that the battery didn't exceed its designed voltage of 32 volts, the National Transportation Safety Board said in a statement.

Airbus confident of avoiding Boeing battery issue

January 17, 2013 4:47 pm | by CARLO PIOVANO - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Airbus said it was confident its planes would not encounter the same technical problems afflicting archrival Boeing's 787s, even though they use the same kind of batteries that have this week raised security concerns. The company may nevertheless be affected eventually, experts say. If investigations show that authorities had approved parts for the 787 that turned out to be deficient, Airbus may face tougher tests when it tries to launch a new plane this year.

Space station to get $18 million balloon-like room

January 17, 2013 3:07 pm | by Hannah Dreier, Associated Press | News | Comments

NASA is partnering with a commercial space company in a bid to replace the cumbersome "metal cans" that now serve as astronauts' homes in space with inflatable bounce-house-like habitats that can be deployed on the cheap. A $17.8 million test project will send to the International Space Station an inflatable room that can be compressed into a 7-foot tube for delivery.

Boeing: 787 production continues as planned

January 17, 2013 12:37 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Boeing says production of its 787 is continuing as planned, even though airlines have grounded the plane because of safety concerns. Federal aviation officials grounded the plane until they can figure out a solution to electrical problems that have caused one battery to catch fire and another to leak in the past two weeks. It's not clear how long the grounding will last.

Webb Telescope teams completes optics milestone

January 17, 2013 10:27 am | News | Comments

Engineers working on NASA's James Webb Space Telescope have recently concluded performance testing on the observatory's aft-optics subsystem at Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp's facilities in Boulder, Colo. This is significant because it means all of the telescope's mirror systems are ready for integration and testing.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading