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Boeing: 787 production continues as planned

January 17, 2013 12:37 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Boeing says production of its 787 is continuing as planned, even though airlines have grounded the plane because of safety concerns. Federal aviation officials grounded the plane until they can figure out a solution to electrical problems that have caused one battery to catch fire and another to leak in the past two weeks. It's not clear how long the grounding will last.

Webb Telescope teams completes optics milestone

January 17, 2013 10:27 am | News | Comments

Engineers working on NASA's James Webb Space Telescope have recently concluded performance testing on the observatory's aft-optics subsystem at Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp's facilities in Boulder, Colo. This is significant because it means all of the telescope's mirror systems are ready for integration and testing.

Aerial platform supports development of lightweight sensors for UAVs

January 17, 2013 7:44 am | News | Comments

A research team at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) is developing an airborne testing capability for sensors, communications devices, and other airborne payloads. This aerial test bed, called the GTRI Airborne Unmanned Sensor System (GAUSS), is based on an unmanned aerial vehicle made by Griffon Aerospace and modified by GTRI.

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Dreamliner woes spotlight Japan battery maker

January 17, 2013 6:00 am | by ELAINE KURTENBACH - AP Business Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The troubles with Boeing's 787 Dreamliner are drawing an unwelcome spotlight for the Japanese maker of the powerful lithium-ion batteries that have become the focus of investigations into onboard fire risks. Kyoto, Japan-based GS Yuasa Corp. said it began working Thursday with investigators probing the cause of recent problems with the 787.

Space station to get $18 million balloon-like room

January 16, 2013 8:59 pm | by HANNAH DREIER - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

NASA is partnering with a commercial space company in a bid to replace the cumbersome "metal cans" that now serve as astronauts' homes in space with inflatable bounce-house-like habitats that can be deployed on the cheap. A $17.8 million test project will send to the International Space Station an inflatable room that can be compressed into a 7-foot tube for delivery, officials said Wednesday in a news conference at North Las Vegas-based Bigelow Aerospace.

Meteorite made up of rare early solar system material

January 16, 2013 9:22 am | News | Comments

It looked like a fireball in the sky. It created a sonic boom. It vaporized upon entering the atmosphere. It's all of the above: The Sutter's Mill Meteorite had the force of 4 kilotons of TNT upon descent and spilled samples of itself over the towns of Columa and Lotus in northern California when it hit Earth last spring. And now a consortium of scientists has determined that the Sutter's Mill Meteorite is the most pristine sample yet collected of the rare Carbonaceous-Mighei chondrite class of meteorites.

Whew! Big asteroid no longer threat to Earth

January 11, 2013 10:31 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

About nine years ago, when astronomers first saw Apophis, they thought there was a 2.7% chance that it would smack into our planet. Later, they lowered the chances to an even more unlikely 1 in 250,000. Now it's never mind, they say, as the 1,060-foot wide rock will approach to within 20,000 miles.

Farthest supernova yet for measuring cosmic history

January 10, 2013 2:27 pm | News | Comments

In 2004 the Supernova Cosmology Project used the Hubble Space Telescope to find a tantalizing supernova that appeared to be almost 10 billion light-years distant. But Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists had to wait until a new camera was installed on the Hubble years later before they could confirm the candidate's identity and redshift as a Type Ia "standard candle." The spectrum and light curve of supernova SCP-0401 are now known with clarity; it is the supernova furthest back in time that can be used for precise measurements of the expansion history of the universe.

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Netzsch to supply SpaceX’s thermal analysis laboratory instruments

January 10, 2013 10:12 am | News | Comments

Netzsch Instruments North America LLC announced that it is currently the sole supplier to Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) of high-temperature thermal analysis instruments used to characterize material properties for space applications. The instruments will be used to fine-tune properties of existing materials and to develop new materials for use in the demanding, harsh environments of space.

Boeing defends Dreamliner, safety questions remain

January 9, 2013 6:35 pm | by JOSHUA FREED - AP Business Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

  Boeing's 787 is supposed to revolutionize air travel. It just needs to get out of its own way first. The new plane is undoubtedly Boeing's most visible. It's built from composites instead of aluminum and comes with the promise of the most comfortable ride in the sky. At $200 million each, 787s are an important part of Boeing's future, even though it will be a while before it makes money on them.

Telescope gives researchers a glimpse of the beginning of time

January 9, 2013 9:27 am | News | Comments

Where do we come from? What is the universe made of? Will the universe exist only for a finite time or will it last forever? These are just some of the questions that University of California, San Diego physicists are working to answer in the high desert of northern Chile.

Mock Mars trek finds down-to-Earth sleep woes

January 8, 2013 9:19 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

In 2010, six volunteers were confined in a cramped mock spaceship in Moscow to simulate a voyage to Mars. They emerged after 17 months, claiming a successful experience, but encountered difficulties in getting enough sleep. A study conducted during the experiment found that the lack of slumber can turn intrepid space travelers into drowsy couch potatoes

Carbon found in Vesta's craters

January 8, 2013 8:43 am | News | Comments

Images taken by the framing camera onboard NASA's space probe Dawn show two enormous craters in the southern hemisphere of the asteroid Vesta, a remarkable protoplanet that is a time capsule of early planet formation in the solar system. Scientists have recently found that the asteroids that created these impact features also delivered dark, carbonaceous material to the protoplanet.

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At least one in six stars has an Earth-sized planet

January 7, 2013 3:41 pm | News | Comments

The quest for a twin Earth is heating up. Using NASA's Kepler spacecraft, astronomers are beginning to find Earth-sized planets orbiting distant stars. A new analysis of Kepler data shows that about 17% of stars have an Earth-sized planet in an orbit closer than Mercury.

DARPA selects SwRI’s K-band space crosslink radio

January 7, 2013 9:16 am | News | Comments

The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) recently selected Southwest Research Institute to provide the flight low-rate crosslink wireless communications platform for the System F6 Program.

Curiosity Rover explores “Yellowknife Bay”

January 7, 2013 9:06 am | News | Comments

After imaging during the holidays, NASA's Mars rover Curiosity resumed driving Jan. 3 and pulled within arm's reach of a sinuous rock feature called "Snake River." Snake River is a thin curving line of darker rock cutting through flatter rocks and jutting above sand. Curiosity's science team plans to get a closer look at it before proceeding to other nearby rocks.

Martian rock from Sahara desert unlike others

January 3, 2013 4:25 pm | by ALICIA CHANG - AP Science Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

  Scientists are abuzz about a coal-colored rock from Mars that landed in the Sahara desert: A yearlong analysis revealed it's quite different from other Martian meteorites. Not only is it older than most, it also contains more water, tests showed. The baseball-size meteorite, estimated to be 2 billion years old, is strikingly similar to the volcanic rocks examined on the Martian surface by the NASA rovers Spirit and Opportunity, which found water-bearing minerals.

Researchers develop acrobatic space rovers to explore moons, asteroids

January 2, 2013 7:48 am | News | Comments

Stanford University researchers, in collaboration with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, have designed a robotic platform that could take space exploration to new heights. The mission proposed for the platform involves a mother spacecraft deploying one or several spiked, roughly spherical rovers to the Martian moon Phobos.

From Cassini for the holidays: A splendor seldom seen

December 21, 2012 12:21 pm | News | Comments

Just in time for the holidays, NASA's Cassini spacecraft, in orbit around Saturn for more than eight years now, has delivered another glorious, backlit view of the planet Saturn and its rings.On Oct. 17, 2012, during its 174th orbit around the gas giant, Cassini was deliberately positioned within Saturn's shadow, a perfect location from which to look in the direction of the sun and take a backlit view of the rings and the dark side of the planet.

Clays on Mars: More plentiful than expected

December 21, 2012 9:30 am | News | Comments

A new study indicates that clay minerals, rocks that usually form when water is present for long periods of time, cover a larger portion of Mars than previously thought.  In fact, the research team say clays were in some of the rocks studied by Opportunity when it landed at Eagle crater in 2004. But Opportunity doesn’t have the capability any longer to detect these clays, which were found using spectroscopic analysis from the Mars Reconnaissance Observer.

Asteroid surfaces more complex than previously thought

December 21, 2012 8:39 am | News | Comments

Meteorites that had fallen from an asteroid impact that lit up the skies over California and Nevada in April were quickly recovered by scientists and recent studies report that this space rock is an unusual example from a rare group known as carbonaceous chondrites, which contain some of the oldest material in the solar system. It is also complex, containing molecules such as water and amino acids.

Closest Sun-like star may have planets

December 19, 2012 10:40 am | News | Comments

An international team of scientists has discovered that Tau Ceti, one of the closest and most Sun-like stars, may have five planets. The surprise finding was the result of combining more than 6,000 observations from three different instruments and applying intensive modeling to the data. New techniques allowed the scientists to find signals half the size previously thought possible.

Team confirms “gusty winds” in space turbulence

December 17, 2012 3:53 pm | by Gary Galluzzo, University of Iowa | News | Comments

In much the same way that a plane is jolted back and forth by invisible gusts of wind, turbulence is common in space, where chaotic motions affect the movements of ionized gas, or plasma. A research team led by the University of Iowa reports to have directly measured this turbulence for the first time in the laboratory.

Innovation on Wheels

December 14, 2012 11:35 am | by Paul Livingstone | Articles | Comments

The Mars Science Laboratory is more than the biggest rolling science laboratory ever put on another planet. It's a systems engineering—and product development—triumph.

Twin NASA spacecraft prepare to crash into moon

December 13, 2012 4:38 pm | by Alicia Chang, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

On Friday, engineers are turning off the science instruments in preparation for Monday's big finale. After nearly a year circling the moon, NASA's Ebb and Flow will meet their demise when they crash—on purpose—into the lunar surface. Just don't expect to see celestial fireworks as it will happen on the dark side of the moon.

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