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Scientists will soon be tracking the course of chemical reactions in real time. A quantum cascade laser, which records 1,000 spectra/second, makes it all possible. © Fraunhofer IAF

Mini laser facilitites real-time quality control

June 12, 2015 2:17 pm | by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft | News | Comments

Good quality and precision are essential—a dictum that also applies to products from the pharmaceutical and chemical industry. While the quality of chemical products is often still being monitored manually during the production process, a laser-based system could take over this task in future, allowing for a continuous monitoring in real time.

The cement industry’s CO2 emissions can only be cut by actually removing CO2 from flue gasses.

Fighting climate change—with cement

June 12, 2015 12:31 pm | by Lars Martin Hjorthol, Norwegian University of Science and Technology | News | Comments

Carbon capture—membrane-based technology developed at NTNU is one of four technologies that may be used in a full-scale CO2 capture project—in a cement factory. The four technologies being tested as part of the project are amines (Aker Solutions), membranes (NTNU, SINTEF, DNV GL, Air Products), regenerating calcium cycle (Alstom) and solid sorbents (Research Triangle Institute, USA).

Longstanding problem put to rest

June 11, 2015 9:51 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Comparing the genomes of different species is the basis of a great deal of modern biology. DNA sequences that are conserved across species are likely to be functionally important, while variations between members of the same species can indicate different susceptibilities to disease. The basic algorithm for determining how much two sequences of symbols have in common is now more than 40 years old.

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Synthetic immune organ produces antibodies

June 11, 2015 9:32 am | by Anne Ju, Cornell Univ. | News | Comments

Cornell Univ. engineers have created a functional, synthetic immune organ that produces antibodies and can be controlled in the lab, completely separate from a living organism. The engineered organ has implications for everything from rapid production of immune therapies to new frontiers in cancer or infectious disease research.

Engineer creates origami battery

June 11, 2015 8:20 am | by Ryan Yarosh, Binghamton Univ. | News | Comments

Origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, can be used to create beautiful birds, frogs and other small sculptures. Now a Binghamton Univ. engineer says the technique can be applied to building batteries, too. Seokheun "Sean" Choi developed an inexpensive, bacteria-powered battery made from paper.

Probing what happens to plutonium in a nuclear explosion

June 11, 2015 7:33 am | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

For years, research on nuclear weapons has relied on old data, limited experiments and computer modeling. But this year, that pattern has changed. Scientists have run new experiments that simulate what happens to plutonium in a nuclear explosion. The research will deepen scientists’ understanding of the element, and help them analyze a nuclear event should one occur.

More Than Just a Pretty Face

June 10, 2015 11:30 am | by Tim Studt | Articles | Comments

The developers of the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) describe their project as “a new and liberating lab typology that promotes collaboration and medical discovery, attracting the best researchers from around the world.” With design by global design and consulting firm Woods Bagot, SAHMRI was the first project completed within the new South Australian Health and Biomedical Precinct.

Researchers make ultrasensitive conductivity measurements

June 10, 2015 11:25 am | by Jade Boyd, Rice Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers at Rice Univ. have discovered a new way to make ultrasensitive conductivity measurements at optical frequencies on high-speed nanoscale electronic components. In a series of experiments, researchers linked pairs of puck-shaped metal nanodisks with metallic nanowires and showed how the flow of current at optical frequencies through the nanowires produced “charge transfer plasmons” with unique optical signatures.

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Boron compounds for OLEDs

June 10, 2015 11:15 am | by Goethe Univ. Frankfurt | News | Comments

Major advances in the field of organic electronics are currently revolutionizing previously silicon-dominated semiconductor technology. Customized organic molecules enable the production of lightweight, mechanically flexible electronic components that are perfectly adapted to individual applications. Chemists at the Goethe Univ. have now developed a new class of organic luminescent materials.

Fast, accurate synchronization in the “blink” of an eye

June 10, 2015 9:41 am | by Univ. of Southern California | News | Comments

"Let's synchronize our watches." It's the classic line before a group goes out on a mission. We are all familiar with the concept of synchronized clocks—less known, but equally important, is that wireless devices need to be synchronized too. However, instead of requiring a precision of minutes, wireless devices have to make their clocks match within very small fractions of a second.

3D printing with metals achieved

June 10, 2015 9:25 am | by Univ. of Twente | News | Comments

A team of researchers from the Univ. of Twente has found a way to 3D print structures of copper and gold, by stacking microscopically small metal droplets. These droplets are made by melting a thin metal film using a pulsed laser.

Toward “green” paper-thin, flexible electronics

June 10, 2015 9:15 am | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

The rapid evolution of gadgets has brought us an impressive array of “smart” products from phones to tablets, and now watches and glasses. But they still haven’t broken free from their rigid form. Now scientists are reporting a new step toward bendable electronics. They have developed the first light-emitting, transparent and flexible paper out of environmentally friendly materials via a simple, suction-filtration method.

Polymer network enhances cell adhesion, growth for tissue regeneration

June 10, 2015 8:07 am | by A*STAR | News | Comments

Tissues and organs in the body are sometimes damaged to such an extent that they require artificial support to heal. Now, A*STAR researchers have used star-shaped polymers to produce a 3-D network that is both compatible with human tissue and facilitates cells to adhere and proliferate under controlled biological conditions.

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“Nano-raspberries” could bear fruit in fuel cells

June 10, 2015 7:50 am | by NIST | News | Comments

Researchers at NIST have developed a fast, simple process for making platinum "nano-raspberries", microscopic clusters of nanoscale particles of the precious metal. The berry-like shape is significant because it has a high surface area, which is helpful in the design of catalysts. Even better news for industrial chemists: the researchers figured out when and why the berry clusters clump into larger bunches of "nano-grapes."

Argonne advances engine simulation

June 10, 2015 7:34 am | by Greg Cunningham, Argonne National Laboratory | News | Comments

For engine designers in the digital age, time is money. And that time is measured in computer cycles. Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are partnering with Convergent Science Inc. to speed up a key piece of modeling and simulation software to ensure those cycles are used as effectively as possible, reducing product development time and resulting in better engines and savings for consumers.

Schematic, cutaway view of the geometry used to generate currents of spin from currents of heat. Pulses of laser light heat the left side of the sample and create an intense current of heat passing through the [Co,Ni] ferromagnet. This current of heat cre

Ultrafast heat conduction manipulates nanoscale magnets

June 9, 2015 12:27 pm | by Rick Kubetz, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have uncovered physical mechanisms allowing the manipulation of magnetic information with heat. These new phenomena rely on the transport of thermal energy, in contrast to the conventional application of magnetic fields, providing a new, and highly desirable way to manipulate magnetization at the nanoscale.

From ancient Egyptians roasting a dripping cut of beef next to the Great Pyramid of Giza to a Boy Scout learning to build a log cabin fire in his backyard, everyone builds fires with the same general shape.  And now we know why.

The shape of a perfect fire

June 9, 2015 11:56 am | by Ken Kingery, Duke University | News | Comments

From ancient Egyptians roasting a dripping cut of beef next to the Great Pyramid of Giza to a Boy Scout learning to build a log cabin fire in his backyard, everyone builds fires with the same general shape. And now we know why.

Scientists observe photographic exposure live at the nanoscale

June 9, 2015 10:27 am | News | Comments

Scientists have now monitored the chemical processes during a photographic exposure at the level of individual nanoscale grains in real-time. The advanced experimental method enables the investigation of a broad variety of chemical and physical processes in materials with millisecond temporal resolution.

Engineers develop a computer that operates on water droplets

June 9, 2015 9:49 am | News | Comments

Computers and water typically don't mix, but in Manu Prakash's lab, the two are one and the same. Prakash, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford, and his students have built a synchronous computer that operates using the unique physics of moving water droplets.

Injectable electronics hold promise for basic neuroscience, treatment of neuro-degenerative diseases

June 9, 2015 9:45 am | News | Comments

It's a notion that might be pulled from the pages of science-fiction novel — electronic devices that can be injected directly into the brain, or other body parts, and treat everything from neuro-degenerative disorders to paralysis. It sounds unlikely, until you visit Charles Lieber's lab.

Futuristic components on silicon chips

June 8, 2015 11:09 am | by Jason Socrates Bardi, American Institute of Physics | News | Comments

A team of IBM researchers has developed a relatively simple, robust and versatile process for growing crystals made from compound semiconductor materials that will allow them be integrated onto silicon wafers. This is an important step toward making future computer chips that will allow integrated circuits to continue shrinking in size and cost even as they increase in performance.

A Window To Containment Facility Design

June 8, 2015 9:24 am | by Lindsay Hock, Editor | Articles | Comments

Can a high containment lab have windows? Can the traditional model of a high containment lab be turned inside out? Can a high containment facility offer better life quality? The answer to all these questions is yes. Home to three international reference labs for 10 exotic viral diseases of livestock, The Pirbright Institute focuses on virology and, specifically, animal health, including zoonotic diseases.

Stretchable ceramics made by flame technology

June 8, 2015 7:49 am | by Kiel Univ. | News | Comments

Synthesizing nanoscale materials takes place within high-tech laboratories, where scientists in full-body suits keep every grain of dust away from their sensitive innovations. However, scientists at Kiel Univ. proved that this is not always necessary. They have successfully been able to transfer the experience from furnace to laboratory while synthesizing nanoscale materials using simple and highly efficient flame technology.

Next-gen illumination using silicon quantum dot-based white-blue LED

June 5, 2015 10:07 am | by Hiroshima Univ. | News | Comments

A Si quantum dot (QD)-based hybrid inorganic/organic light-emitting diode (LED) that exhibits white-blue electroluminescence has been fabricated by a Hiroshima Univ. team. A hybrid LED is expected to be a next-generation illumination device for producing flexible lighting and display, and this is achieved for the Si QD-based white-blue LED.

Soft robotic glove puts control in the grasp of hand-impaired patients

June 5, 2015 9:19 am | by Kat J. McAlpine, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering | Videos | Comments

Having achieved promising results in proof–of–concept prototyping and experimental testing, a soft robotic glove under development could someday help people suffering from loss of hand motor control to regain some of their daily independence.

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