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Water used for hydraulic fracturing varies widely across United States

July 1, 2015 7:00 am | by American Geophysical Union | News | Comments

The amount of water required to hydraulically fracture oil and gas wells varies widely across the country, according to the first national-scale analysis and map of hydraulic fracturing water usage detailed in a new study.

U.N. says China to make pledge for climate treaty this month

June 5, 2015 12:03 am | by Cara Anna, Associated Press | News | Comments

China is expected this month to formally submit its pledge for a global climate treaty that...

EPA plans temporary pesticide restrictions while bees feed

May 28, 2015 12:04 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

If honeybees are busy pollinating large, blooming croplands, farmers wanting to spray toxic...

Anti-pollution rules have uncertain effects

May 26, 2015 10:38 am | by Indiana Univ. | News | Comments

Air pollution regulations issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are estimated to...

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To fight bee decline, Obama proposes more land to feed bees

May 19, 2015 2:04 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

A new federal plan aims to reverse America's declining honeybee and monarch butterfly populations by making millions of acres of federal land more bee-friendly, spending millions of dollars more on research and considering the use of fewer pesticides. While putting different type of landscapes along highways, federal housing projects and elsewhere may not sound like much in terms of action.

EPA suggests guidelines to spot algae in drinking water

May 7, 2015 2:00 pm | by John Flesher, AP Environmental Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

The EPA is proposing guidelines to help state and local officials detect dangerous levels of algal toxins in drinking water. EPA officials have released suggested thresholds that should prompt actions, such as issuing do-not-drink warnings or taking steps to quickly reduce levels of two types of algal toxins. One set of trigger points was recommended for young children and another for the rest of the population.

UN climate chief says technology has changed carbon politics

May 7, 2015 4:04 am | by Rod Mcguirk, Associated Press | News | Comments

Technological advances that have reduced prices and improved efficiency of renewable energy have helped transform the politics around climate change since 2009 when an attempt to forge a global deal on reducing greenhouse gas emissions crashed in Copenhagen, the United Nations climate chief said Thursday.

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U.S. pledges to cut emissions in global treaty

April 1, 2015 8:32 am | by Josh Lederman, Associated Press | News | Comments

The U.S. pledged to cut its greenhouse gas emissions up to 28% as part of a global treaty aimed at preventing the worst effects of climate change, the White House said. The Obama administration's contribution to the treaty, which world leaders expect to finalize in December, codifies a commitment President Barack Obama first made late last year in Beijing.

Do biofuel policies seek to cut emissions by cutting food?

March 30, 2015 7:36 am | by Catherine Zandonella, Princeton Univ. | News | Comments

A study found government biofuel policies rely on reductions in food consumption to generate greenhouse gas savings. Shrinking the amount of food that people and livestock eat decreases the amount of carbon dioxide that they breathe out or excrete as waste. The reduction in food available for consumption, rather than any inherent fuel efficiency, drives the decline in carbon dioxide emissions in government models, the researchers found.

Environment Tops Issues at Meeting in China

March 9, 2015 9:34 am | by Associated Press, Jack Chang | News | Comments

China's severe environmental problems and government pledges to fix them have dominated the start of the country's annual legislative meeting, as leaders try to ease public worries about air, water and soil contamination that threaten to derail the country's economic rise and cast doubts on the ruling Communist Party.  

Climate science literacy unrelated to public acceptance of human-caused global warming

February 24, 2015 8:18 am | by Yale Univ. | News | Comments

Deep public divisions over climate change are unrelated to differences in how well ordinary citizens understand scientific evidence on global warming, according to a new study published by Prof. Dan Kahan. In fact, members of the public who score the highest on a climate science literacy test are the most politically polarized on whether human activity is causing global temperatures to rise.

Hydrogels Fight Invasive Ants

February 19, 2015 2:00 pm | by Purdue Univ. | News | Comments

Pesticide sprays and baits are common tactics for managing pest ants. But sprays can have little long-term impact and carry environmental costs such as chemical contamination of soil and water sources. Water-storing crystals known as hydrogels can effectively deliver pesticide bait to invasive Argentine ants, quickly decimating a colony.

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Researcher Calculate Plastic Waste in Ocean

February 13, 2015 7:00 am | by UC Santa Barbara | News | Comments

Ocean currents have been carrying floating debris into all five of the world’s major oceanic gyres for decades. However, exactly how much plastic is making its way into the world’s oceans and from where it originates has been a mystery— until now.  

Refineries challenge EPA plan to cut emissions

January 29, 2015 10:26 am | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

A rule proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency that aims to curb emissions from oil refineries and petrochemical manufacturers is causing tensions to flare between the agency and industry groups. The agency is reviewing a flood of public comments on the issue and is expected to finalize the rule by April 17, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News.

Obama moves to create first methane limits for gas drilling

January 14, 2015 8:37 am | by Josh Lederman, Associated Press, Associated Press | News | Comments

The Obama administration said Wednesday it will issue the first regulations to cut down on methane emissions from new natural gas wells, aiming to curb the discharge of a potent greenhouse gas by roughly half. Relying once again on the Clean Air Act, the rules join a host of others that Obama has ordered in an effort to slow global warming despite opposition to new laws in Congress that has only hardened since the midterm elections.

Global boom in hydropower expected this decade

October 24, 2014 10:50 am | News | Comments

An unprecedented boom in hydropower dam construction is underway, primarily in developing countries and emerging economies. While this is expected to double the global hydropower electricity production, it could reduce the number of remaining large free-flowing rivers by 20% and pose a threat to freshwater biodiversity. A new database has been developed in Denmark to support decision making on sustainable modes of electricity production.

China, U.S., India push world carbon emissions up

September 22, 2014 9:42 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Spurred chiefly by China, the United States and India, the world spewed far more carbon pollution into the air last year than ever before. The world pumped an estimated 39.8 billion tons of carbon dioxide into the air last year by burning coal, oil and gas. That is 778 million tons or 2.3% more than the previous year. World leaders gather this week to discuss how to reduce heat-trapping gases. 

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Engineers call for national approach to flooding

September 22, 2014 9:07 am | by Geoff Mulvihill, Associated Press | News | Comments

The American Society of Civil Engineers are urging Congress and the Obama Administration to develop a national strategy for mitigating flood risks, saying the U.S. has not fully heeded lessons from Hurricane Katrina and Superstorm Sandy. A sustainable way to pay for infrastructure maintenance and updates to help manage floods is needed, they say, and they will release their full recommendations Monday in Philadelphia.

Ohio water crisis: Threat isn't going away soon

August 6, 2014 10:06 am | by John Seewer, Associated Press | News | Comments

The threat of toxins contaminating water supplies along western Lake Erie is far from over even after Toledo, Ohio, declared its water safe again. That's because the algae leaving behind the dangerous toxins each summer aren't supposed to peak until September. The chances of another water emergency over the next few months will depend on the winds, rains and temperatures that dictate how large the algae grow and where algae blooms end up.

Obama rolls out rule to cut power plant pollution

June 2, 2014 11:58 am | by Dina Cappiello and Josh Lederman, Associated Press | News | Comments

The U.S. government rolled out a plan Monday to cut carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by 30% by 2030, a centerpiece of President Barack Obama's efforts to reduce the pollution linked to global warming. The rule, expected to be final next year, sets in motion one of the most significant actions on global warming in U.S. history.

Dangerous nitrogen pollution could be halved

May 13, 2014 12:16 pm | News | Comments

The most important fertilizer for producing food is, at the same time, one of the most important risks for human health: nitrogen. If no action is taken, nitrogen pollution could rise by 20% by 2050 in a middle-of-the-road scenario, according to a study now published by scientists of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. This research also shows that ambitious mitigation efforts could decrease the pollution by 50%.

Climate meeting to discuss future of fossil fuels

April 7, 2014 9:14 am | by Frank Jordans, Associated Press | News | Comments

After concluding that global warming almost certainly is man-made and poses a grave threat to humanity, the U.N.-sponsored Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPCC, is meeting next week in Berlin to chart ways in which the world can curb the greenhouse gas emissions that scientists say are overheating the planet. It is also trying to give estimates on what it would cost.

U.S. clean-air efforts stay on target

March 28, 2014 11:28 am | News | Comments

National efforts in the last decade to clear the air of dangerous particulate matter have been so successful that most urban areas have already attained the next benchmark, according to new research by Rice Univ. Atmospheric researchers at Rice studied the state implementation plans from 23 regions mandated by the EPA to reduce particulate matter (PM) smaller than 2.5 um (PM 2.5) to less than 15 micrograms per cubic meter by 2009.

Colorado's proposed emissions rules get a hearing

November 21, 2013 6:58 pm | by KRISTEN WYATT - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Colorado's proposal to curb air pollutants from oil and gas operations got praise from industry representatives and environmental activists Thursday at its first hearing. But both sides warned the Colorado Air Quality Control Commission that there will still be haggling over the particulars of three rule changes introduced this week.

Next generation of biofuels is still years away

November 14, 2013 12:54 pm | by Jonathan Fahey, Associated Press | News | Comments

The first trickle of fuels made from agricultural waste is finally winding its way into the nation's energy supply. But the full benefits of this fuel source remain many years away, and ethanol, which was meant to be a stop-gap until non-food sources of fuel were found, has been far more damaging to the environment than the government predicted.

Prairies vanish in the U.S. push for green energy

November 13, 2013 11:15 am | by Chet Brokaw and Jack Gillum, Associated Press | News | Comments

Across the Dakotas and Nebraska, more than 1 million acres of the Great Plains are giving way to cornfields as farmers transform the wild expanse that once served as the backdrop for American pioneers. This expansion of the Corn Belt is fueled in part by America's green energy policy, which requires oil companies to blend billions of gallons of corn ethanol into their gasoline.

Clean Air Act has improved water quality in the Chesapeake Bay watershed

November 7, 2013 7:00 am | News | Comments

A new study shows that the reduction of pollution emissions from power plants in the mid-Atlantic is making an impact on the quality of the water that ends up in the Chesapeake Bay. The study confirms a decreased amount of emissions of nitrogen oxide from coal-fired power plants.

Federal trial over Gulf oil spill to resume

September 30, 2013 3:05 am | by MICHAEL KUNZELMAN - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The trial resumes Monday for the federal litigation spawned by BP's massive 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the company's response to the deadly disaster. At the start of the trial's second phase, U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier is expected to hear two hours of opening statements from lawyers for BP and for Gulf Coast residents and businesses who claim the spill cost them money.

Web tool expands access to scientific, regulatory chemical information

September 9, 2013 12:54 pm | News | Comments

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has launched a web-based tool, called ChemView, to significantly improve access to chemical specific regulatory information developed by EPA and data submitted under the Toxic Substances Control Act. The tool displays key health and safety data in an online format that allows comparison of chemicals by use and by health or environmental effects.

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