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The Lead

Particulate Filter Relies on RF

August 19, 2014 4:54 pm | Award Winners

Jointly developed by Filter Sensing Technologies Inc., Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the RF-DPF Diesel Particulate Filter Sensor is a radio frequency (RF)-based sensor and control system used to measure the amount, type and distribution of contaminants on ceramic diesel particulate filters (DPFs).

A New DDF Engine Conversion Kit

August 19, 2014 1:57 pm | Award Winners

PTT Public Co. Ltd.’s PTT DIESEL CNG is a new concept for DDF...

Charging electric cars efficiently…and inductively

July 31, 2014 10:25 am | News | Comments

We already charge our toothbrushes and cellphones...

NIST develops prototype meter test for hydrogen refueling stations

July 22, 2014 2:20 pm | News | Comments

Three automakers plan to begin selling hydrogen-...

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After hybrid success, Toyota gambles on fuel cell

July 17, 2014 8:55 am | by Yuri Kageyama, AP Business Writer | News | Comments

Long dismissed as too impractical and expensive for everyday cars, fuel cell technology is getting a push into the mainstream by Toyota, the world's top-selling automaker. Buoyed by its success with electric-gasoline hybrid vehicles, Toyota is betting that drivers will embrace hydrogen fuel cells, an even cleaner technology. The company’s fuel cell car will go on sale before April next year.

Inventor pushes solar panels for roads, highways

July 11, 2014 11:33 am | by Nicholas K. Geranios, Associated Press | News | Comments

The solar panels that Idaho inventor Scott Brusaw has built aren't meant for rooftops. They are meant for roads, driveways, parking lots, bike trails and, eventually, highways. Brusaw, an electrical engineer, says the hexagon-shaped panels can withstand the wear and tear that comes from inclement weather and vehicles, big and small, to generate electricity.

Tesla handing over the keys to its technology

June 13, 2014 8:21 am | by Michael Liedtke and Dee-Ann Durbin, AP Business Writers | News | Comments

Tesla CEO Elon Musk promised Thursday to give away the company's entire patent portfolio to all comers, as long as they promised not to engage courtroom battles over intellectual property. The decision is meant to encourage other automakers to expand beyond gasoline-burning automobiles, and opens the door to more collaboration with Tesla, which is already making electric systems for Daimler and Toyota.

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Safety Is Key When Planning for U.S. High-speed Rail Lines

June 4, 2014 11:46 am | by Xavier Fornari, Product Marketing Manager, ANSYS, Elancourt, France | Articles | Comments

High-speed rail is a frequently discussed topic, but one that has yet to become a reality in the U.S. A number of states and regions in the U.S. including Texas, California, the Pacific Northwest and Minnesota, to name a few, have planned projects to bring high-speed rail to fruition.

A new solution for storing hydrogen fuel for alternative energy

May 21, 2014 2:13 pm | News | Comments

An international team of researchers have figured out a new way of storing and releasing hydrogen by making a unique crystal phase of a material containing lithium, boron and the key ingredient, hydrogen. To check how they could get the hydrogen back out of the material, the scientists heated it and found that it released hydrogen easily, quickly and only traces of unwanted by-products.

Driverless car test site gets industry partners

May 6, 2014 10:21 am | by David Runk, Associated Press | News | Comments

General Motors, Ford and Toyota are joining the Univ. of Michigan in establishing a testing site for driverless cars that will simulate a cityscape, and will work with the school to help make such vehicles commercially viable, officials announced Tuesday. The Michigan Mobility Transformation Center's 32-acre testing site near the Ann Arbor school's North Campus is scheduled to be completed this fall.

Relieving electric vehicle range anxiety with improved batteries

April 16, 2014 8:15 am | by Frances White, PNNL | News | Comments

Electric vehicles could travel farther and more renewable energy could be stored with lithium-sulfur batteries that use a unique powdery nanomaterial. Researchers added the powder, a kind of nanomaterial called a metal organic framework, to the battery's cathode to capture problematic polysulfides that usually cause lithium-sulfur batteries to fail after a few charges.

Oak Ridge study pegs fuel economy costs of common practices

April 9, 2014 3:07 pm | News | Comments

People who pack their cars and drive like Clark Griswold in National Lampoon’s “Vacation” pay a steep penalty when it comes to fuel economy, according to a report by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Researchers tested vehicles at a variety of speeds with different configurations of load and tire inflation. While the findings were not unexpected, they serve as a reminder of how drivers can save money by taking simple measures.

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Advanced warning systems increase safety at intersections, study shows

April 9, 2014 9:28 am | News | Comments

A major factor making driving difficult is hazards that are sudden and hard to predict. The wrong choice in this situation, known as the “dilemma zone,” may lead to crashes. Roadside and in-vehicle display warning systems may help drivers handle these hazards by predicting their occurrence and providing advanced warning to the driver, according to a new study.

Hybrid vehicles more fuel efficient in India, China than in U.S.

March 31, 2014 4:14 pm | News | Comments

What makes cities in India and China so frustrating to drive in makes them ideal for saving fuel with hybrid vehicles, according to new research by scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Heavy traffic, aggressive driving style and few freeways allow hybrids in these countries to deliver as much as a 50% increase in fuel savings over conventional internal combustion vehicles.

Driving down fuel usage

March 10, 2014 10:57 am | by Rob Matheson, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Despite their potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and fuel consumption, electric and hybrid cars and trucks struggled for years to find a solid customer base. Much of the reason came down to cost and convenience: Electric car batteries are expensive, and charging them requires plug-in infrastructure that’s still sparse in the U.S.

Natural gas locomotives may prove cheaper, cleaner

January 23, 2014 2:07 am | by Josh Funk - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The diesel-burning locomotive, the workhorse of American railroads since World War II, will soon begin burning natural gas—a potentially historic shift that could cut fuel costs, reduce pollution and strengthen the advantage railroads hold over trucks in long-haul shipping. Rail companies want to take advantage of booming natural gas production that has cut the price of the fuel by as much as 50%.

Study: EDVs have little impact on U.S. pollutant emissions

January 21, 2014 7:59 am | News | Comments

A new study from North Carolina State Univ. indicates that even a sharp increase in the use of electric drive passenger vehicles (EDVs) by 2050 would not significantly reduce emissions of high-profile air pollutants carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide or nitrogen oxides.

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Project aims to produce liquid transportation fuel from methane

January 16, 2014 8:13 am | News | Comments

How’s this for innovative: A Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory-led team hopes to engineer a new enzyme that efficiently converts methane to liquid transportation fuel. Methane is the main component of natural gas and biogas from wastewater treatments and landfills. Another source is stranded natural gas, which is currently flared or vented at remote oil fields, and which represents an enormous unused energy resource.

Battery development may extend range of electric cars

January 10, 2014 7:59 am | News | Comments

It's known that electric vehicles could travel longer distances before needing to charge and more renewable energy could be saved for a rainy day if lithium-sulfur batteries can just overcome a few technical hurdles. Now, a novel design for a critical part of the battery has been shown to significantly extend the technology's lifespan, bringing it closer to commercial use.

Suburban sprawl cancels carbon-footprint savings of dense urban cores

January 6, 2014 4:56 pm | by Robert Sanders, UC Berkeley | News | Comments

According to a new study by Univ. of California, Berkeley researchers, population-dense cities contribute less greenhouse-gas emissions per person than other areas of the country, but these cities’ extensive suburbs essentially wipe out the climate benefits. Suburbs account for about 50% of all household emissions in the United States.

SwRI now operating a test bed for intelligent, connected vehicles

December 9, 2013 9:40 am | News | Comments

A connected vehicle network, with vehicles exchanging information with the highway infrastructure and other vehicles using wireless communications, could improve traffic safety, mobility and environmental impacts. Southwest Research Institute, which has considerable expertise in intelligent vehicle development, is now serving as an official Connected Vehicle Affiliated Test Bed for this technology.

Nanoscale coatings improve stability, efficiency of devices for renewable fuel generation

December 2, 2013 8:14 am | News | Comments

Splitting water into its components, two parts hydrogen and one part oxygen, is an important first step in achieving carbon-neutral fuels to power our transportation infrastructure. Now, North Carolina State Univ. researchers and colleagues from the Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have shown that a specialized coating technique can make certain water-splitting devices more stable and more efficient.

Dim traffic sensors dull how “smart” freeways are

November 25, 2013 8:46 am | by Justin Pritchard, Associated Press | News | Comments

Buried under thousands of miles of pavement in California are 27,000 traffic sensors that are supposed to help troubleshoot both daily commutes and long-term maintenance needs on some of the nation's most heavily used and congested roadways. About 9,000 of them do not work, despite their critical role in an "intelligent transportation" system designed to do things like detect the congestion that quickly builds after an accident.

Toyota vows fuel cell model by 2015 in green push

November 20, 2013 3:58 am | by YURI KAGEYAMA - AP Business Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Toyota is promising a mass-produced fuel cell car by 2015 in the latest ambitious push to go green by an industry long skeptical about the super-clean technology that runs on hydrogen. Satoshi Ogiso, the Toyota Motor Corp. executive in charge of fuel cells, said the vehicle is not just for leasing to officials and celebrities but will be an everyday car for ordinary consumers, widely available at dealers.

An unconventional car

November 19, 2013 9:06 am | by Marlene Cimons, National Science Foundation | News | Comments

A city car under development at Ohio State Univ. has no engine, no transmission and no differential. It weighs half as much as a conventional car and is powered by battery-power motors in each of its four wheels. But it needs help from a computer to stay stable and operating smoothly, which is why the research team is designing sophisticated algorithms for the vehicle's onboard computer.

Penguin-inspired propulsion system

November 14, 2013 1:10 pm | News | Comments

Back in 1991, Nature published a picture from the IMAX movie Antarctica, pointing out that emperor penguins can accelerate from 0 to 7 m/s in less than a second. That got the attention of Flavio Noca, now an aerodynamics professor in Switzerland, who will present a new spherical joint mechanism inspired by penguin propulsion at the next American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics meeting in Pittsburgh.

New approach advances wireless power transfer for vehicles

November 14, 2013 10:41 am | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State Univ. have developed new technology and techniques for transmitting power wirelessly from a stationary source to a mobile receiver—moving engineers closer to their goal of creating highway “stations” that can recharge electric vehicles wirelessly as the vehicles drive by.

Prairies vanish in the U.S. push for green energy

November 13, 2013 11:15 am | by Chet Brokaw and Jack Gillum, Associated Press | News | Comments

Across the Dakotas and Nebraska, more than 1 million acres of the Great Plains are giving way to cornfields as farmers transform the wild expanse that once served as the backdrop for American pioneers. This expansion of the Corn Belt is fueled in part by America's green energy policy, which requires oil companies to blend billions of gallons of corn ethanol into their gasoline.

Combination of three propulsion technologies brings maritime fuel savings

November 11, 2013 10:04 am | News | Comments

A new maritime propulsion technology called the RudderPod, which steers independently of the main propulsion unit, could save up to half a million euros in fuel costs, according to the TRIPOD research project collaborators in Europe who plan to retrofit the new system to a ship for testing. The project aims to improve propeller efficiency as well by integrating RudderPod with new types of propellers.

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