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The Lead

Energy-subsidy reform can be achieved with proper preparation, outside pressure

May 6, 2014 9:33 am | News | Comments

Reform of energy subsidies in oil-exporting countries can reduce carbon emissions and add years to oil exports, according to a new paper from Rice Univ.’s Baker Institute for Public Policy. The paper reviews the record of energy-subsidy reforms and argues that big exporters should reduce energy demand by raising prices, and that this can be done without undermining legitimacy of governments that depend on subsidies for political support.

Oil and Gas Industry Training Requires Rich New Technology

April 15, 2014 8:06 am | by Oliver Diaz, CEO and Founder, FuelFX | Articles | Comments

The stakes are incredibly high for the safety and compliance efforts of today’s oil and gas...

A few “problem wells” source of greenhouse gas

April 15, 2014 7:48 am | by Elizabeth K. Gardner, Purdue Univ. | News | Comments

High levels of the greenhouse gas methane were found above shale gas wells at a production point...

Obama admin drives ahead with new cleaner gas rule

March 3, 2014 2:22 pm | by Josh Lederman - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The Obama administration is driving ahead with a dramatic reduction in sulfur in gasoline and...

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Study indicates improvements needed in handling methane emissions

February 19, 2014 7:23 am | News | Comments

A new study led by the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis says that the total impact of switching to natural gas depends heavily on leakage of methane during the natural gas life cycle, and suggests that more can be done to reduce methane emissions and to improve measurement tools which help inform policy choices.

Study: America's natural gas system is leaky and in need of a fix

February 14, 2014 8:05 am | by Mark Golden, Stanford Univ. | News | Comments

The first thorough comparison of evidence for natural gas system leaks confirms that organizations including the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have underestimated U.S. methane emissions generally, as well as those from the natural gas industry specifically.

Is natural gas a solution to mitigating climate change?

February 11, 2014 8:18 am | by Cynthia Eller, California Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Methane, a key greenhouse gas, has more than doubled in volume in Earth's atmosphere since 1750. Its increase is believed to be a leading contributor to climate change. But where is the methane coming from? Research by a California Institute of Technology atmospheric chemist suggests that losses of natural gas—our "cleanest" fossil fuel—into the atmosphere may be a larger source than previously recognized.

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Simulating Subsidence from Oil and Gas Extraction

February 6, 2014 10:33 am | by S. Monaco, G. Capasso, S. Mantica, Eni E&P D and Datye, R. Vitali, Dassault Systemes | Articles | Comments

Oil and gas remain primary power sources for both personal and industrial use worldwide. Extraction of these fuel resources from underground reservoirs involves complex geomechanical processes, and can result in subsidence of the ground over a reservoir. Since this occurrence can have an impact on the environment and affect the operability of extraction equipment, it needs to be accurately predicted and kept within safe limits.

Getting carbon out of your portfolio is tricky

January 24, 2014 4:08 pm | by Jonathan Fahey - AP Energy Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

If you are like millions of Americans and own a broad stock index fund, you own parts of Exxon Mobil, Peabody Energy and other companies that earn money selling oil, coal and other fossil fuels. For some, that's great. Fossil fuels give us light, keep us warm, help grow our food, deliver our products and jet us around the planet. Some companies are stable and profitable and offer consistent dividends that pad retirement accounts nicely.

Natural gas locomotives may prove cheaper, cleaner

January 23, 2014 2:07 am | by Josh Funk - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The diesel-burning locomotive, the workhorse of American railroads since World War II, will soon begin burning natural gas—a potentially historic shift that could cut fuel costs, reduce pollution and strengthen the advantage railroads hold over trucks in long-haul shipping. Rail companies want to take advantage of booming natural gas production that has cut the price of the fuel by as much as 50%.

Partnership works to covert natural gas to liquid fuel

January 15, 2014 8:17 am | News | Comments

In an effort to put to good use natural gas (methane) that might otherwise become pollution, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is collaborating with start-up company Calysta Energy on a new technology to convert natural gas to liquid fuel. The process involves taking natural gas from oil and gas operations, and converting it to methanol that can be used as a fuel or converted to other useful chemicals.

Natural gas exports: Slow walk or "danger zone"?

January 8, 2014 3:19 am | by MATTHEW DALY - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The debate over exporting liquefied natural gas is intensifying as the Energy Dept. considers an array of applications to ship the fuel to Japan, India and other countries where prices are far higher than in the United States. Some large manufacturers that use natural gas say the department is moving too quickly to approve gas exports, pushing the U.S. into a "danger zone" that could raise prices and harm the economy.

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Study: U.S. spewing 50% more methane than EPA says

November 26, 2013 11:37 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The United States is spewing 50% more methane—a potent heat-trapping gas—than the federal government estimates, a new comprehensive scientific study says. Much of it is coming from just three states: Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas. It means methane, which doesn’t stay in the air long but is 21 times more potent at trapping heat than carbon dioxide,  may be a bigger global warming issue than thought, scientists say.

Researchers use simple scaling theory to better predict shale production

November 19, 2013 7:05 am | News | Comments

Scientists at The Univ. of Texas at Austin have developed a new method to estimate gas production from hydraulically fractured wells in the Barnett Shale. The approach, which uses a simple physics theory called scaling, is intended to help the energy industry accurately identify low- and high-producing horizontal wells, as well as accurately predict how long it will take for gas reserves to deplete in the wells.

How do we balance needs of energy, water and climate?

November 15, 2013 7:26 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT News Office | News | Comments

In deciding how best to meet the world’s growing needs for energy, the answers depend crucially on how the question is framed. Looking for the most cost-effective path provides one set of answers; including the need to curtail greenhouse gas emissions gives a different picture. Adding the need to address looming shortages of fresh water, it turns out, leads to a very different set of choices.

Methane-munching microorganisms meddle with metal

November 11, 2013 2:46 pm | News | Comments

Methane hydrates are a potential energy source, but they are also a potential source of global warming. A pair of cooperating microbes on the ocean floor "eats" this methane in a unique way, and a new study provides insights into their surprising nutritional requirements. Learning how these methane-munching organisms exist in extreme environments could provide clues about how the deep-sea environment might change in a warming world.

Emissions pricing revenues could overcompensate profit losses of fossil fuel owners

November 5, 2013 4:43 pm | News | Comments

According to a study published by scientists at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, the strategy of assigning a price to global carbon nanotubes emissions could generate a revenue of $32 trillion over the 21st century, exceeding by far the $12 trillion of lost profits from fossil fuel owners.

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Ukraine, Chevron sign shale gas deal

November 5, 2013 9:16 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The Ukrainian government signed a shale gas production-sharing agreement with the Chevron, as the country strives for energy independence from neighboring Russia. Energy Minister Eduard Stavitsky said that under the deal, Chevron will initially invest $350 million into exploratory and drilling work in the Oleska field in western Ukraine. Total investment could surpass $10 billion over 50 years.

Neutrons, electrons and theory reveal secrets of natural gas reserves

October 28, 2013 3:08 pm | News | Comments

Gas and oil deposits in shale have no place to hide from an Oak Ridge National Laboratory technique that provides an inside look at pores and reveals structural information potentially vital to the nation’s energy needs. The research could clear the path to the more efficient extraction of gas and oil from shale.

Calif. finds more instances of offshore fracking

October 21, 2013 7:56 am | by Alicia Chang and Jason Dearen, Associated Press | News | Comments

In waters off Long Beach, Seal Beach and Huntington Beach—some of the region's most popular surfing strands and tourist attractions—oil companies have used fracking at least 203 times at six sites in the past two decades. This discovery made from drilling records and interviews shows that offshore fracking is more widespread and frequent that state officials believed.

Radioactive shale gas contaminants found at wastewater discharge site

October 2, 2013 11:56 am | News | Comments

According to a recent study led by scientists at Duke Univ., elevated levels of radioactivity, salts and metals have been found in river water and sediments at a site where treated water from oil and gas operations is discharged into a western Pennsylvania creek.

Study: Methane leaks from gas drilling not huge

September 17, 2013 1:02 pm | by Kevin Begos and Seth Borenstein, Associated Press | News | Comments

According to research published this week drilling and fracking for natural gas don't seem to spew immense amounts of the greenhouse gas methane into the air, as has been feared. The study, mostly funded by energy interests,  doesn't address other fracking concerns about potential air and water pollution, but does generally with government estimates.

Arizona State, Sandia Labs sign renewable energy agreement

September 3, 2013 4:36 pm | News | Comments

A formal partnership agreement to encourage collaborative research, build educational and workforce development programs and inform policy endeavors regarding renewable energy efforts has been signed by Sandia National Laboratories and Arizona State Univ. The move will facilitate multidisciplinary collaborations and help them secure research funding.

Both sides of fracking debate turn out for Obama

August 23, 2013 10:57 am | by MICHAEL GORMLEY - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Supporters and opponents of fracking in the political hotbed where New York's natural gas deposit lies lined the route being taken Friday by visiting President Barack Obama, shouting messages for him while trying to pressure Gov. Andrew Cuomo as he weighs whether to allow the practice in New York.

Calif. coastal panel takes up offshore fracking

August 15, 2013 3:27 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

California regulators on Thursday were set to take up offshore fracking after revelations that the practice had quietly occurred off the coast since the late 1990s. The California Coastal Commission added the issue at the last minute to its agenda during its monthly meeting. 

Blowout could tip regulator focus to shallow-water

July 31, 2013 10:38 am | by JEFF AMY - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Last week's blowout on a natural gas rig off the Louisiana coast could shift regulators' focus to shallow-water drilling and make an overhaul of safety equipment regulations more likely. The rig, owned by Hercules Offshore and operated under contract to Walter Gas & Oil, spewed gas July 23 that eventually ignited. The fire damaged the Hercules 265, which was within days of wrapping up its drilling contract.

Ford to offer natural gas F-150 for 2014

July 31, 2013 12:02 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Ford soon will offer a natural gas version of its F-150 pickup truck, the most popular vehicle in America. The company is the first Detroit automaker with that option in a light-duty pickup truck. Ford, General Motors and Chrysler already have natural gas-powered heavy-duty trucks.

DOE study: Fracking chemicals didn't taint water

July 22, 2013 2:04 pm | by Kevin Begos, Associated Press | News | Comments

A landmark federal study on hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, shows no evidence that chemicals from the natural gas drilling process moved up to contaminate drinking water aquifers at a western Pennsylvania drilling site. After a year of monitoring, the researchers found that the chemical-laced fluids used to free gas trapped deep below the surface stayed thousands of feet below the shallower areas that supply drinking water

Americans continue to use more renewable energy sources

July 22, 2013 9:12 am | News | Comments

Americans used more natural gas, solar panels and wind turbines and less coal to generate electricity in 2012, according to the most recent U.S. energy charts released by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Natural gas use is up in the electricity generation sector, where it has basically substituted directly for coal, while sustained low natural gas prices have prompted a shift from coal to gas in the electricity generating sector.

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