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R&D Daily PM
JANUARY 20, 2015
 
IN THIS ISSUE
  NEWS  
  Laser-patterning technique turns metals into supermaterials  
  NEWS  
  Snails produce weaponized insulin  
  NEWS  
  Ocean floor dust gives new insight into supernovae  
  VIDEO  
  New way to model sickle cell behavior  
  NEWS  
  Wearable sensor clears path to long-term EKG, EMG monitoring  
  NEWS  
  Melting glaciers have big carbon impact  

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R&D is now accepting entries for the 53rd annual R&D 100 Awards. Groundbreaking research is taking shape daily across industry, government, and academia. Make sure your innovation is recognized along with the most significant new technology introduced in the past year.


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FEATURED STORY

Ocean floor dust gives new insight into supernovae

Featured Story

Scientists plumbing the depths of the ocean have made a surprise finding that could change the way we understand supernovae, exploding stars way beyond our solar system. They have analyzed extraterrestrial dust thought to be from supernovae that has settled on ocean floors to determine the amount of heavy elements created by the massive explosions.


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Leak-free Rotary Vane Pumps

The ULVAC GHD magnetically coupled rotary vane pumps eliminate oil leaks because they have no shaft seals to wear out. A built-in check valve at the inlet port prevents oil backflow, eliminating messy cleanups and downtime. GHD pumps offer reduced power consumption and quieter operation. These pumps are ideal for analytical instruments and laboratory use due to their high pumping speed, cool running temperature and compact size.


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NEWS

Wearable sensor clears path to long-term EKG, EMG monitoring

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Researchers from North Carolina State Univ. have developed a new, wearable sensor that uses silver nanowires to monitor electrophysiological signals, such as electrocardiography (EKG) or electromyography (EMG). The new sensor is as accurate as the “wet electrode” sensors used in hospitals, but can be used for long-term monitoring and is more accurate than existing sensors when a patient is moving.


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NEWS

Snails produce weaponized insulin

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As predators go, cone snails are slow moving and lack the typical fighting parts. They’ve made up for it by producing a vast array of fast-acting toxins that target the nervous systems of prey. A new study reveals that some cone snails add a weaponized form of insulin to the venom cocktail they use to disable fish.


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NEWS

Melting glaciers have big carbon impact

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As the Earth warms and glaciers all over the world begin to melt, researchers and public policy experts have focused largely on how all of that extra water will contribute to sea level rise. But another impact lurking in that inevitable scenario is carbon. More specifically, what happens to all of the organic carbon found in those glaciers when they melt?


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NEWS

Laser-patterning technique turns metals into supermaterials

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By zapping ordinary metals with femtosecond laser pulses researchers from the Univ. of Rochester have created extraordinary new surfaces that efficiently absorb light, repel water and clean themselves. The multifunctional materials could find use in durable, low maintenance solar collectors and sensors.


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VIDEO

New way to model sickle cell behavior

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Patients with sickle cell disease often suffer from painful attacks known as vaso-occlusive crises, during which their sickle-shaped blood cells get stuck in tiny capillaries, depriving tissues of needed oxygen. Blood transfusions can sometimes prevent such attacks, but there are currently no good ways to predict when a vaso-occlusive crisis, which can last for several days, is imminent.


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NEWS

Geophysicists find the crusty culprits behind sudden tectonic plate movements

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Yale Univ.-led research may have solved one of the biggest mysteries in geology: namely, why do tectonic plates beneath the Earth’s surface, which normally shift over the course of tens to hundreds of millions of years, sometimes move abruptly? A new study says the answer comes down to two things: thick crustal plugs and weakened mineral grains.


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NEWS

2015 Laboratory of the Year competition open for entries

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The editors of R&D Magazine and Laboratory Design are now accepting entries to the 49th international Laboratory of the Year competition. This annual award recognizes the best new and renovated laboratories that combine all aspects of the building into a superior working environment. The entry deadline is January 31, 2015 (11:59p.m. Eastern Standard Time).


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