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R&D Daily PM
FEBRUARY 25, 2015
 
IN THIS ISSUE
  VIDEO  
  New flow battery to keep big cities lit, green and safe  
  NEWS  
  Electric car driving range, emissions depend on where you live  
  ARTICLE  
  3-D Printing Blasts Off, Explodes Into the Future  
  NEWS  
  Seven reasons to attend the Lab Design Conference  
  NEWS  
  Boosting carbon’s stability for better lithium-air batteries  
  NEWS  
  Physicists offer solution to puzzle of the origin of matter in the universe  

Learn About AFM Applications in Polymer Science

Download our new application note to learn how Asylum Research AFMs can help characterize polymer morphology, nanomechanical properties (including viscoelastic information), thermal properties, solvent effects, and electrical and functional behavior.


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FEATURED STORY

Boosting carbon’s stability for better lithium-air batteries

Featured Story

To power a car so it can travel hundreds of miles at a time, lithium-ion batteries of the future are going to have to hold more energy without growing too big in size. That's one of the dilemmas confronting efforts to power cars through rechargeable battery technologies. In order to hold enough energy to enable a car trip of 300 to 500 miles before recharging, current lithium-ion batteries become too big or too expensive.


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Position Light Loads at High Speed

Automate your positioning applications with Zaber`s new RSB rotation stages: 20 kg load capacity, 300 rpm max. rotational speed, and optional rotary encoder. Motor up/down configurations also allow for different mounting options.


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NEWS

New “knobs” can dial in control of materials

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Designing or exploring new materials is all about controlling their properties. In a new study, Cornell Univ. scientists offer insight on how different “knobs” can change material properties in ways that were previously unexplored or misunderstood.


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NEWS

Enabling solar cells to use more sunlight

Scientists of the Univ. of Luxembourg and of the Japanese electronics company TDK report progress in photovoltaic research: They have improved a component that will enable solar cells to use more energy of the sun and thus create a higher current. The improvement concerns a conductive oxide film which now has more transparency in the infrared region.


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Access cutting-edge research with IEEE Xplore Digital Library

IEEE Xplore Digital Library: Innovate faster with the world's most advanced engineering research. See if your organization qualifies for a complimentary trial to IEEE Xplore.


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ARTICLE

3-D Printing Blasts Off, Explodes Into the Future

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In 2013, battle lines were drawn. Two stark competitors were looking to speed repairs and cut costs on parts for gas turbines. First to the drawing board was GE, who started using 3-D printing technology at its Global Research Center in Niskayuna, N.Y., to produce more than 85,000 fuel nozzles for its anticipated LEAP engine technology.


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VIDEO

New flow battery to keep big cities lit, green and safe

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Ensuring the power grid keeps the lights on in large cities could be easier with a new battery design that packs far more energy than any other battery of its kind and size. The new zinc-polyiodide redox flow battery, described in Nature Communications, uses an electrolyte that has more than two times the energy density of the next-best flow battery used to store renewable energy and support the power grid.


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Entries Now Open

R&D is now accepting entries for the 53rd annual R&D 100 Awards. Groundbreaking research is taking shape daily across industry, government, and academia. Make sure your innovation is recognized along with the most significant new technology introduced in the past year.


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NEWS

Physicists offer solution to puzzle of the origin of matter in the universe

Most of the laws of nature treat particles and antiparticles equally, but stars and planets are made of particles, or matter, and not antiparticles, or antimatter. That asymmetry, which favors matter to a very small degree, has puzzled scientists for many years. New research offers a possible solution to the mystery of the origin of matter in the universe.


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NEWS

Electric car driving range, emissions depend on where you live

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Many car buyers weighing whether they should go all electric to help the planet have at least one new factor to consider before making the switch: geography. Based on a study of a commercially available electric car, scientists report in Environmental Science & Technology that emissions and driving range can vary greatly depending on regional energy sources and climate.


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NEWS

Seven reasons to attend the Lab Design Conference

The 2015 Laboratory Design Conference is open for registration. Your opportunity to learn, network and participate in discussions about current and future trends in lab design is coming to Atlanta, April 27-29th. The countdown to the conference has begun, and here’s a countdown of reasons why you should be there.


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