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R&D Daily PM
JULY 28, 2014
 
IN THIS ISSUE
  NEWS  
  Measuring the smallest magnets  
  NEWS  
  UConn makes 3-D copies of antique instrument parts  
  NEWS  
  A transistor-like amplifier for single photons  
  NEWS  
  Not in my backyard: U.S. sending dirty coal abroad  
  NEWS  
  Climate change, air pollution will combine to curb food supplies  

Safe, portable protection of your samples or evidence

Safe, reliable glove bag. Light, portable and disposable, it is an ideal protection tool to accommodate your requirements in the lab or in the field.


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FEATURED STORY

Technology translation engine launches “organs-on-chips” company

Featured Story

The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard Univ. announced that its human “Organs-on-Chips” technology will be commercialized by a newly formed private company to accelerate development of pharmaceutical, chemical, cosmetic and personalized medicine products.


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Simulation of Microfluidic Devices Using COMSOL

Researchers and engineers in the microfluidics field are using multiphysics simulation to investigate transport and chemical reactions, single- and multi-phase flow, flow in porous media, and electrokinetic effects.
In this webinar, we will:
• Give an overview of such phenomena
• Explain methods for creating accurate simulations of microfluidic processes and devices using COMSOL Multiphysics.


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NEWS

Measuring the smallest magnets

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A wildly bouncing tennis ball that travels a millions times the distance of its own size would be difficult to measure. But attaching the same ball to a measuring device would eliminate the “noise”. Researchers in Israel recently used a similar trick to measure the interaction between the smallest possible magnets (two electrons) after neutralizing magnetic noise that was a million times stronger than the signal they needed to detect.


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NEWS

UConn makes 3-D copies of antique instrument parts

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The medical practice of Dr. Robert Howe, a reproductive endocrinologist in Massachusetts, introduced him to how computerized tomography could make precise 3-D images of body parts. As a student of music history, he realized the same technology could help him study delicate musical instruments from the past. With the help of engineers, these rare instruments are now being both imaged and printed printed in 3-D.


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NEWS

A transistor-like amplifier for single photons

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With the help of ultracold quantum gas, physicists have achieved a 20-fold amplification of single-photon signals, a step that could aid all-optical data processing efforts. The breakthrough was made with the invention of a new type of optical transistor build from a cloud of rubidium atoms, held just above absolute zero, that is transparent to certain wavelengths of light.


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NEWS

Not in my backyard: U.S. sending dirty coal abroad

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As the Obama administration weans the U.S. off dirty fuels blamed for global warming, energy companies have been sending more of America's unwanted energy leftovers to other parts of the world where they could create even more pollution. This fossil fuel trade threatens to undermine the president's strategy for reducing the gases blamed for climate change and also reveals a side effect of countries acting alone on a global problem.


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NEWS

Climate change, air pollution will combine to curb food supplies

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Many studies have shown the potential for global climate change to cut food supplies. But these studies have, for the most part, ignored the interactions between increasing temperature and air pollution. A new study shows that these interactions can be quite significant, suggesting that policymakers need to take both warming and air pollution into account in addressing food security.


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NEWS

U.S. plans wide seismic testing of sea floor

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The U.S. Geological Survey plans this summer and next to map the outer limits of the continental shelf, and also study underwater landslides that would help predict where and when tsunamis might occur. But environmentalists say it could cause the same type of marine life damage they fought unsuccessfully to prevent this month off the coast of New Jersey.


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ARTICLE

Mobile Control In the Lab

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The ability to adapt to changing situations is critical for today’s labs. Today, many lab equipment systems are designed with the flexibility to accommodate these needs. Time is also of utmost importance, and the ability for a researcher to walk away from their work, or monitor it on the go, is a new standard.


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PRODUCT

Ultra-high Performance Liquid Chromatograph

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Thermo Fisher Scientific has unveiled a new ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography system, the Vanquish UHPLC. The monolithic case contains an instrument that combines the ruggedness of an integrated system with the flexibility and serviceability of a modular system. Vanquish stands about 25% lower than comparable modular stacks for safety and convenience in the laboratory.


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PRODUCT

Automated Gel Electrophoresis System

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PerkinElmer Inc. has announced the launch of the new LabChip GX Touch and GXII Touch automated electrophoresis systems. The LabChip platform’s key feature is automation of conventional gel electrophoresis, eliminating the need for manual sample preparation and allowing precise nucleic acid quantification and protein characterization.


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